Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

Please note that all times are shown in the time zone of the conference. The current conference time is: 29th June 2022, 11:19:33am CEST

 
 
Session Overview
Session
WS129: Reflecting on your Role Modeling with a Scientific Approach
Time:
Tuesday, 16/Nov/2021:
12:00pm - 1:30pm

Session Chair: Virginia Grande, Uppsala University, Sweden
Session Chair: Dr. Anne-Kathrin Peters, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden
Session Chair: Prof. Mats Daniels, Uppsala University, Sweden
Session Chair: Dr. Elena Ruiz Larrocha, UNED, Spain
Location: Room E (9 - Numancia) Humanities Faculty
Floor -2

https://goo.gl/maps/soeYZ51SJzjxv2q88

Having a role model can be beneficial, e.g. students may have higher self-esteem, motivation and academic achievement. We are all potential role models in different contexts. What is it that we model? If we consider whether there is intention and awareness of our own role modeling, how does it affect our reflection on what others may copy from us? In this workshop, participants from all backgrounds, including educators in any career stage (teachers, course coordinators, teaching assistants,...) are invited to think about their achievements and aspects of themselves that they can model for their students (or equivalent). The discussion then broadens to include all kinds of role modeling that the participants deem needed in the contexts they belong to and who (other than the participant themselves) can model these. The results of these discussions can be used by each participant individually to reflect on their own practice and to support discussions with other stakeholders, such as program coordinators or managers.

Session Abstract

The facilitators of this workshop have relevant experience in role modeling and identity theory, computing education, and the analysis of achievements and aspects that can be modeled, such as professional competencies.

Virginia Grande’s PhD project is about developing the understanding of role modeling in engineering education, particularly in computing, through the use of theories and collected empirical data (interviewing teachers about their experiences as role models for their students). Besides the examples above, ethical theories are part of her work to analyze role modeling. She has organized international conferences and workshops in her different roles over a decade as a volunteer in the Association for Computing Machinery.

Professor Mats Daniels provides his expertise in research on professional competencies. An important topic in his work together with Virginia Grande is how development and especially attitudes towards the development of professional competencies, is connected to role model issues.

Dr. Anne-Kathrin Peters has researched the discipline as it is constructed in higher education. Her research suggests that disciplinary values and norms in education affect what role models are accessible to students, e.g. we might have women in the discipline but it may not be legitimate to endorse them for their (feminine) ways of participating in the discipline. Students may reject certain professional identities due to the lack of validation from their peers. Peters will contribute with theoretical underpinnings on disciplinary culture and identity and use those to facilitate the discussions.


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Presentations

Reflecting on Your Role Modeling With a Scientific Approach

Virginia Grande, Mats Daniels, Anne-Kathrin Peters

Uppsala University, Sweden

Having a role model can be beneficial, e.g. for students benefits include higher self-esteem, motivation and academic achievement. Teachers are potential role models for their students. Others are potential role models in different contexts, such as a project leader. What is it that they model? If we consider whether there is intention and awareness of their own role modeling, how does it affect each teacher's reflection on what students may copy from them? In this workshop, participants from all backgrounds, including educators in any career stage (teachers, course coordinators, teaching assistants,...) are invited to think about their achievements and aspects of themselves that they can model for their students (or equivalent). The discussion then broadens to include all kinds of role modeling that the participants deem needed in the contexts they belong to and who (other than the participant themselves) can model these. The results of these discussions can be used by each participant individually to reflect on their own practice and to support discussions with other stakeholders, such as program coordinators or managers.