Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

Please note that all times are shown in the time zone of the conference. The current conference time is: 29th June 2022, 08:50:16pm CEST

 
 
Session Overview
Date: Tuesday, 16/Nov/2021
9:30am - 5:30pmSup07: Registration and ONSITE conference support
Location: Main Hall Lobby Humanities Faculty
9:30am - 7:00pmSup08: Online conference support
The online support is available through the online Conference Platform
The online support is available through the online Conference Platform
10:00am - 11:30amSV01: Madrid city online visit (East/Pacific)
Location: Room A Humanities Faculty
Session Chair: Prof. Manuel Castro, UNED, Spain
Session Chair: Prof. Edmundo Tovar, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain
Madrid city tour guide: Ana Velasco
Online visit through Madrid as part of the cultural and social experience of the conference. This session is expected for the Asia and East registrants, as well as for the Europa and Africa ones. Will be replicated in the session SV02 for the American registrants
10:00am - 11:30amUNED/ISEP: UNED/ISEP Internal session
Location: Room Meetings (6.19) Humanities Faculty
Session Chair: Prof. Elio San Cristóbal, UNED, Spain
Session Chair: Prof. Andre Fidalgo, Isep, Portugal
Session Chair: Dr. Gustavo R. Alves, Polytechnic of Porto - School of Engineering, Portugal
11:30am - 12:00pmCof03: Coffee social break
Location: Main Hall Lobby Humanities Faculty
12:00pm - 1:30pmP05: The UNESCO Engineering Report: Engineering for Sustainable Development
Location: Main Hall Humanities Faculty
Session Chair: Dr. Amal KASRY, UNESCO, France
Session Chair: Rovani Sigamoney, UNESCO, France
Panelists:
Prof. Tariq Durrani, co-chair of the Advisory Board of the Report - Background
Dawn Bonfield,Diversity and Women in Engineering
Soma Chakrabarti, Lifelong learning in Engineering
Yuan Si and the International Centre of Engineering Education (ICEE), Inter-regional trends in engineering around the world
:
12:00pm - 1:30pmS01: Diversity, Gender, Identity and Multicultural Education
Location: Room B Humanities Faculty
Session Chair: Dr. Maria Ileana Ruiz-Cantisani, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Mexico
Session Chair: Prof. Andre Fidalgo, Isep, Portugal
Session Chair: Prof. Elio San Cristóbal, UNED, Spain
12:00pm - 1:30pmS02: Peace of Engineering, Ethics, Global Development and Sustainability
Location: Room D (3.31) Humanities Faculty
Session Chair: Prof. Manuel Gericota, School of Engineering - Polytechnic of Porto, Portugal
Session Chair: Federico Gastón Lerro, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Argentine Republic
Session Chair: Prof. Rosario Gil Ortego, UNED, Spain
12:00pm - 1:30pmS03: Attributes for the Future Engineer
Location: Room C (Philosophy) Humanities Faculty
Session Chair: Prof. Pedro Fonseca, Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal
Session Chair: Dr. Claes Fredriksson, Ansys, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Dr. Blanca Quintana, UNED, Spain
12:00pm - 1:30pmWS05: Microdegrees
Location: Room A Humanities Faculty
Session Chair: Dr. Alaa Ashmawy, IFEES, Egypt
Session Chair: Prof. Michael Auer, IAOE, Austria
Session Chair: Dr. África López-Rey, UNED, Spain
Engineering education has evolved over a relatively short span of three centuries, from an apprenticeship and self-regulated learning model to a structured college system with predominantly classroom delivery. The current pace of progress in knowledge and new skills driven by the industry are rapidly pressing the need for reform in engineering higher education. New paradigms have emerged in the form of microdegrees and stackable credentials, along with a focus on contextual engineering education, grounded in experiential and project-based learning. In this workshop, IFEES plans for establishing a framework for accrediting stackable credentials and micro-degrees at the global level will be discussed. By the end of this workshop, an 8-month road map for launching a global accreditation system for microdegrees and stackable credentials will be formulated, with input from participants.
:
12:00pm - 1:30pmWS129: Reflecting on your Role Modeling with a Scientific Approach
Location: Room E (9 - Numancia) Humanities Faculty
Session Chair: Virginia Grande, Uppsala University, Sweden
Session Chair: Dr. Anne-Kathrin Peters, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden
Session Chair: Prof. Mats Daniels, Uppsala University, Sweden
Session Chair: Dr. Elena Ruiz Larrocha, UNED, Spain
Having a role model can be beneficial, e.g. students may have higher self-esteem, motivation and academic achievement. We are all potential role models in different contexts. What is it that we model? If we consider whether there is intention and awareness of our own role modeling, how does it affect our reflection on what others may copy from us? In this workshop, participants from all backgrounds, including educators in any career stage (teachers, course coordinators, teaching assistants,...) are invited to think about their achievements and aspects of themselves that they can model for their students (or equivalent). The discussion then broadens to include all kinds of role modeling that the participants deem needed in the contexts they belong to and who (other than the participant themselves) can model these. The results of these discussions can be used by each participant individually to reflect on their own practice and to support discussions with other stakeholders, such as program coordinators or managers.
The facilitators of this workshop have relevant experience in role modeling and identity theory, computing education, and the analysis of achievements and aspects that can be modeled, such as professional competencies. Virginia Grande’s PhD project is about developing the understanding of role modeling in engineering education, particularly in computing, through the use of theories and collected empirical data (interviewing teachers about their experiences as role models for their students). Besides the examples above, ethical theories are part of her work to analyze role modeling. She has organized international conferences and workshops in her different roles over a decade as a volunteer in the Association for Computing Machinery. Professor Mats Daniels provides his expertise in research on professional competencies. An important topic in his work together with Virginia Grande is how development and especially attitudes towards the development of professional competencies, is connected to role model issues. Dr. Anne-Kathrin Peters has researched the discipline as it is constructed in higher education. Her research suggests that disciplinary values and norms in education affect what role models are accessible to students, e.g. we might have women in the discipline but it may not be legitimate to endorse them for their (feminine) ways of participating in the discipline. Students may reject certain professional identities due to the lack of validation from their peers. Peters will contribute with theoretical underpinnings on disciplinary culture and identity and use those to facilitate the discussions.
12:00pm - 1:30pmWS183: Developing Student-Centered Responsibility for their Own Learning; A Metacognitive Approach
Location: Room F (2 - Philology) Humanities Faculty
Session Chair: Dr. Peter Shull, Penn State University, United States of America
Session Chair: Prof. Clara Perez, UNED, Spain
Arguably, student responsibility is one of the biggest factors in student success. Unfortunately, it is one of the success skills that is tacidly assumed students will acquire it on their own. Further, students and faculty rarely have a common understanding of what being responsible means. To further complicate the issue people describe responsibility in terms of specific actions, e.g., turning a paper in on time, attending classes. What they do not do is have a methodology that can be used to determine if an individual is taking responsibility or not.
This workshop will provide participants with clarity on what is meant by taking responsibility, specific methods to determine if one is taking responsibility, and clear, simple methodologies to train students in how to take responsibility for their own learning. These methods can be integrated into any class without loss of learning of the class subject matter. (Note, to increase student and faculty buy in, the methods rely on common engineering tools such as the engineering design process—although here it is used as a meta-cognitive learning tool). Opening
• Introduction of the presenter and his journey.
• Guided Activity—What’s your situation and why it doesn’t change! Yet there is hope and it comes from students acting like college students but in a new way.
B. Developing a common sense of responsibility
• What is student responsibility?
• Activity—audience creating and presenting a skit that demonstrates the basic and common fundamentals of responsibility. The skit emulates faculty’s impressions of student behaviors, beliefs, and attitudes—typically quite hilarious yet enlightening.
• Summarizing and creating a common vocabulary.
C. Developing a common picture of what happens when students are not taking responsibility:
• What is meant when we say students are not being responsible?
• Activity—audience creating and presenting a skit that demonstrates the basic and common fundamentals of a lack of responsibility.
• Summarizing and creating a common vocabulary.
D. Creating a clear picture:
• The audience will synthesize the information in the previous 2 segments and create a clear picture of student responsibility verses lack of responsibility.
E. Introducing the specifics of the method:
• All the methods are solidly grounded in engineering tools that are commonly taught and used in engineering education. This helps create buy-in from students and engineering faculty. 2) The methods require little class time for instruction.
F. Practicing what you preach and understanding the subtleties of the method:
• The audience will practice utilizing their learning in simulated scenario and present experiences.
• Issues and clarifications will be addressed.
• Practical implementation elements will be detailed and practiced.
• Specific details on full implementation will be presented.
G. Developing Lessons:
• The audience will explore their own particular issues and opportunities for implementation at their school.
H. Post workshop support:
• Support for participants implementing the methods will be provided.
Dr. Shull has developed a system of exercises that are designed to develop students’ understanding of the meaning of student responsibility. This method is by design experiential and typically implemented throughout a given course. The actual dedicated class time required for implementation is minimal. The remainder of the learning occurs concurrent with learning of the engineering topical material of the course. The method utilizes a peer mentoring/reflection process whereby students train each other throughout the day-to-day class interactions.
The pilot work was supported by an NSF grant and produced significant result related to students actively taking responsibility for their own learning. Dr. Shull has utilized these methods in all of his engineering classes. They have been adopted by our engineering and engineering technology programs. Dr. Shull has presented this material at numerous venues in the US and internationally. Currently, he is working with a group of universities interested in this work.
1:00pm - 2:00pmLunch02: Lunch ONSITE
Location: Coffee Shop Humanities Faculty
The onsite lunch will be in picnic style, to allow the onsite participants to participate in the sessions they prefer. There will not be stop between the main sessions as we will maximize the worldwide participation.
The onsite participants can pickup the picnic lunch and can eat it inside the coffee shop tables or in any room of the conference EXCEPT in the Main Hall where is not allowed to enter any meal.

https://goo.gl/maps/soeYZ51SJzjxv2q88
1:30pm - 3:30pmIFEES01: IFEES Awards and Keynotes
Location: Main Hall Humanities Faculty
Session Chair: Dr. Alaa Ashmawy, IFEES, Egypt
Session Chair: PJ Boardman, MathWorks, United States of America
Session Chair: Prof. Michael Auer, IAOE, Austria
IFEES Awards and Keynotes

Welcome: Alaa Ashmawy
Commemoration of Luis Scavarda: Uriel Cukierman
IFEES Duncan Fraser Award History: Ariela Sofer
Presentation by MathWorks, P.J. Boardman

Mathworks Keynote: Dr. Tanya Morton, "Tackling Climate Change with Education, Research, and Industrial Collaboration", Director Worldwide Customer Success Engineering, MathWorks
In a recent Times Higher Education Leaders survey, 80% of leaders in higher education said that the pursuit of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) informs how their institution operates. Climate action is amongst the most critical of the SDGs - if we don’t tackle climate change, then many of the other SDGs will become unattainable. In this talk, we’ll look at the 3 elements of the Paris Agreement as a framework for climate action, and highlight examples of how engineers and scientists are contributing to the goals of the agreement. We’ll then take a deeper dive into the engineering megatrend that is the electrification of everything. We will look at examples of how engineers and scientists are collaborating across Education, Research and Industry to tackle the climate crisis. Finally, we will share resources that can help engineering educators prepare students to address the world’s grand challenges.

Introduction of Duncan Fraser Award Recipient: Ariela Sofer
Comments from Duncan Fraser Recipient: William Oakes
Presentation by Sponsor: CTI – Michael Auer, CEO and Founding President, IAoE/CTI

Introduction to Lueny Morell Award, Video, & Announcement of 2022 Lueny Morell Award: Uriel Cukierman and Waldemar Ramirez
Recipient of Lueny Morell Award Comments: Viviana Curatolo and Jorge Almiña
Questions, answers and comments
Panel and participants

Final Comments: Alaa Ashmawy

2021 Duncan Fraser Award: William Oakes
2021 Lueny Morell Award for Educational Innovation in Higher Education in STEAM Award: Viviana Curatolo and Jorge Almiña
2021 Duncan Fraser Award Recipient: William Oakes
In recognition of William Oakes work on re-envisioning engineering education, IFEES honors William Oakes with the 2021 IFEES Duncan Fraser Global Award for Excellence in Engineering Education.
William Oakes will be celebrated during the 2021 World Engineering Education Forum, for more information about his accomplishments, click here
A special thank you goes out to our sponsors, without whom this great initiative would not be possible. The 2021 IFEES Duncan Fraser Global Award is supported by Mathworks represented by P.J. Boardman and CTI represented by Michael Auer.

2021 Lueny Morell Award for Educational Innovation in Higher Education in STEAM
Finally, IFEES present the for the first time the 2021 Lueny Morell Award for Educational Innovation in Higher Education in STEAM to Viviana Curatolo and Jorge Almiña from Universidad Tecnológica Nacional, Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Argentina, for their proposal of The Entropía Project.
In this way, InnovaHiEd Academy honors the memory of its founder, Lueny Morell, a woman who was characterized by her ability to connect people and entities in favor of educational improvement, with a truly global impact, and 2021 Lueny Morell Award for Educational Innovation in Higher Education in STEAM is supported by CTI/IAoE represented by Michael Auer

This session will honor the IFEES Duncan Fraser Award and the first ever Lueny Morell Award recipients, the sponsors who made this award possible, and the jury members who worked fervently to deliberate the winners.
In recognition of his work on re-envisioning engineering education, IFEES honors William Oakes with the 2021 IFEES Duncan Fraser Global Award for Excellence in Engineering Education.
A special thank you goes out to our sponsors, without whom this great initiative would not be possible. The 2021 IFEES Duncan Fraser Global Award is supported by MathWorks represented by P.J. Boardman and CTI represented by Michael Auer. The 2021 Lueny Morrell Award was facilitated by InnovaHiEd and sponsored by CTI and IAOE.
Hereby, the independent Jury established to define the Lueny Morell Award for educational innovation in Higher Education in STEAM has decided to grant the aforementioned award to the nomination presented by Viviana Curatolo and Jorge Almiña from Universidad Tecnológica Nacional, Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Argentina. The Entropía Project presented by the aforementioned candidacy, considered the context of the initiative, its educational impact and, above all, its social impact.
In this way, InnovaHiEd Academy honors the memory of its founder, Lueny Morell, a woman who was characterized by her ability to connect people and entities in favor of educational improvement, with a truly global impact.
3:30pm - 5:00pmP1217: Presidents Forum: Peace Engineering - A Call to Action 2020-2030
Location: Main Hall Humanities Faculty
Session Chair: Dr. Ramiro Jordan, ISTEC-UNM, United States of America
Session Chair: Dr. Alfredo Soeiro, AECEF, Portugal
Session Chair: Prof. Uriel Ruben Cukierman, UTN, Argentine Republic
Panelists:
Manel Martinez-Ramon, King Felipe VI Endowed Chair, Professor, University of New Mexico
Bernard Amadei, UC-Boulder, founder Engineers without Borders-USA
Bruce Cahan, UrbanLogic
Giovanna Fiorillo, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana
Carlos Fuquene, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana
Joseph Hughes, Drexel University
Ramiro Jordan, University of New Mexico
Donna Koechner, University of New Mexico
Tagwa Musa, Sudan University of Science and Technology
Mira Olson, Drexel University
Blanca Oviedo, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana
Margarita Quihuis, Peace Innovation Lab - Stanford
Aniek van Kersen, Peace Engineering Consortium
Felipe Gómez Gallo, Vice President Student Affairs IFEES and President SPEED
Peace Engineering is the application of science, technology, and engineering principles to promote and support peace. It recognizes the important contribution that engineering, the social sciences and other disciplines can make toward a world where prosperity, sustainability, social equity, entrepreneurship, transparency, community voice and engagement, and a culture of quality thrive.
There are urgent calls to action by the National Academy of Engineering , the Nobel Prize Summit , the United Nations, global scientists and others to address and solve, in this decade (2020 – 2030), crucial and widely recognized global challenges before they become more complex and more environmentally, financially, and socially costly; before we reach the point of no return.

WEEF-GEDC 2021 Peace Engineering Panel Pre-conference Discussion:
We will have a Pre-conference discussion, panelists for the WEEF-GEDC 2021 Presidents Forum challenge viewers to get involved.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_0clF-OCLQ
5:00pm - 5:30pmCof04: Coffee social break
Location: Main Hall Lobby Humanities Faculty
5:30pm - 7:00pmSV02: Madrid city online visit (West/Americas)
Location: Room A Humanities Faculty
Session Chair: Prof. Manuel Castro, UNED, Spain
Session Chair: Prof. Edmundo Tovar, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain
Madrid city tour guide: Ana Velasco
Online visit through Madrid as part of the cultural and social experience of the conference. This session is expected for the American registrants, as well as for the Europa and Africa ones. Is replicated from the session SV01 for the Asia and East registrants
7:30pm - 9:00pmSV03: Madrid ONSITE reception
Location: Serreria Belga MCB
Madrid Convention Bureau reception sponsorship
All onsite registrants are expected to arrive directly to the reception

https://goo.gl/maps/ruesryTAZ4rkfPng6