Conference Agenda

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Session Overview
Session
Keynote I:: "Childhood critical illness survivorship: looking back and looking forward to the post-COVID-19 pandemic context"
Time:
Monday, 21/Nov/2022:
10:00am - 11:00am


by Dr Joseph Charles Manning

Location: Auditorium Roux


Session Abstract

Abstract

Globally each year hundreds of thousands of children become critically ill or injured and require life sustaining treatments provided by the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). In industrialised nations most children (~96%) are discharged alive from the PICU. However, for some this is not without newly acquired and residual physical, cognitive, emotional, and social sequalae (called Post Intensive Care Syndrome in pediatrics, PICS-p) that may impact the child and their family in the longer term. 

The COVID-19 pandemic saw significant changes to the case mix, organisation, and delivery of PICU. Considerable visitation restrictions, minimised family-professional interaction, redeployment of intensive care staff, and fragmentation of aftercare services have contributed to exacerbating the iatrogenic harm of the PICU. 

During this keynote, Dr Manning will explore the state of the science regarding PICS-p prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. He will then discuss the impact of the pandemic changes on the experience and outcomes of critically ill/injured children and their families. Dr Manning will conclude by proposing opportunities for research and clinical practice in relation to understanding and supporting families following the PICU in a post-COVID-19 pandemic context. 

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CV

Joseph is a Clinical-Academic Children’s Nurse with a strong national and international profile within the fields of nursing, paediatric critical care, and clinical academic capacity and capability development. 

He is the first registered children’s nurse in the UK to be awarded an HEE NIHR ICA Clinical Lectureship and is seen as a trailblazer in his field. 

He has meaningful concurrent engagement in clinical practice and research, holding frontline healthcare and senior leadership roles at Nottingham Children’s Hospital and an Associate Professorship (Research) / Co-lead of the Centre for Children and Young People Health Research at the University of Nottingham. 

Joseph leads a methodologically diverse and clinically focused programme of research with a mission to improve the experiences, outcomes and lives of children, young people and their families that access acute care. Over the past decade he has received more than £5.4 million in competitive grant capture from national and international funders. 

His contribution and leadership to the nursing profession, clinical academic careers, and nursing research has been recognised by being a recipient of a Chief Nursing Officer for England Gold Lifetime Achievement Award in 2020 and by Her Majesty the Queen’s with a Member of the Order of the British Empire in 2021. 


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Presentations

Childhood critical illness survivorship: looking back and looking forward to the post-COVID-19 pandemic context

Karina Iskrzycki

Swiss Society for Early Childhood Research (SSECR), Switzerland

Globally each year hundreds of thousands of children become critically ill or injured and require life sustaining treatments provided by the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). In industrialised nations most children (~96%) are discharged alive from the PICU. However, for some this is not without newly acquired and residual physical, cognitive, emotional, and social sequalae (called Post Intensive Care Syndrome in pediatrics, PICS-p) that may impact the child and their family in the longer term.

The COVID-19 pandemic saw significant changes to the case mix, organisation, and delivery of PICU. Considerable visitation restrictions, minimised family-professional interaction, redeployment of intensive care staff, and fragmentation of aftercare services have contributed to exacerbating the iatrogenic harm of the PICU.

During this keynote, Dr Manning will explore the state of the science regarding PICS-p prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. He will then discuss the impact of the pandemic changes on the experience and outcomes of critically ill/injured children and their families. Dr Manning will conclude by proposing opportunities for research and clinical practice in relation to understanding and supporting families following the PICU in a post-COVID-19 pandemic context.



 
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