Veranstaltungsprogramm

Eine Übersicht aller Sessions/Sitzungen dieser Veranstaltung.
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Sitzungsübersicht
Datum: Mittwoch, 02.06.2021
14:00 - 16:30Jungwissenschaftlertreffen
Ort: Workshops
Chair der Sitzung: Maurizio Sicorello, Central Institute of Mental Health
Chair der Sitzung: Barbara Schmidt, Universitätsklinikum Jena
Das virtuelle Treffen der Jungwissenschaftler*innen auf der „Psychologie und Gehirn 2021“ richtet sich an Masteranden, Promovierende, Post-Docs und Juniorprofessor*innen und dient dem Austausch und der Vernetzung der Jungwissenschaftler*innen. Zunächst werden die Jungmitgliedervertreter*innen der bioDGPs und der DGPA über ihre Tätigkeiten im vergangenen Jahr berichten und einen Ausblick auf die geplanten Tätigkeiten im kommenden Jahr geben. Dabei legen wir großen Wert auf eure Anregungen und Rückmeldungen. Danach wählen die anwesenden Jungwissenschaftler*innen die neuen stellvertretenden Jungmitgliedervertreter*innen der DGPA sowie der bioDGPs.
Workshops 
17:15 - 18:00Willkommen - Einführung - DGPA & DGPs Preise 2021
Ort: Plenum
Plenum 
18:00 - 19:00Hauptvortrag - Russell A. Poldrack
Ort: Plenum
Chair der Sitzung: Maurizio Sicorello, Central Institute of Mental Health
Chair der Sitzung: Stephan Nebe, Universität Zürich
Towards a culture of computational reproducibility
Ensuring that the results of data analysis are both valid and reproducible is a fundamental responsibility of every computational scientist, but both are increasingly difficult in the context of complex analysis workflows and big data. Building off of ideas from software engineering, I will argue that we need to embrace a culture of computational reproducibility. I will outline a set of values that motivate this work and principles that guide the work, and then focus on a set of practices that can help improve reproducibility in computational science. I will conclude by addressing some potential concerns about the impacts of this cultural shift.
Plenum 
19:00 - 20:00Reproduzierbare Forschung - Fragen und Antworten mit Russell A. Poldrack
Ort: Meet-the-Professor
Chair der Sitzung: Maurizio Sicorello, Central Institute of Mental Health
Chair der Sitzung: Stephan Nebe, Universität Zürich
Meet-the-Professor 
19:00 - 23:00Eröffnungsabend
Ort: Coffee Lounge gather.town
Coffee Lounge gather.town 
Datum: Donnerstag, 03.06.2021
8:30 - 10:00Reward, punishment, cognitive control and context in decision making
Ort: From (epi)genetics to cognition
Chair der Sitzung: Johannes Rodrigues, Julius-Maximilians Universität Würzburg
Reward and punishment processing have tremendous impact on our behavior and decisions. Yet, contexts and cognitive control may alter their impact on behavior. In this symposium, we bring together studies investigating cognitive control and the impact of reward and punishment processing on behavioral and electrocortical outcomes in different contexts. The first study investigated electrocortical responses of the receiver in an ultimatum game to social cues of successful, costly punishment. The fairness of the offer was considered as well as the reward of getting an adequate social reaction to costly punishment. Further exploring the interrelation of reward and punishment, the second study used two three-armed bandit tasks to investigate feedback-locked frontal midline theta power in reward gain versus punishment avoidance learning. Additionally, personality traits were considered. Adding the context of a second chance, the third study focused on the impact of a second stage as a receiver and relevant personality traits in the ultimatum game on behavior, fairness related reward processing (FRN) and cognitive control related EEG-signals (midfrontal theta). Centralizing cognitive control, the fourth study investigated the influence of cognitive effort investment in a flanker task with varying demands and payoffs. Behavioral reactions as well as midfrontal theta band activations revealed interactions of cognitive effort investment with reward and demand. Focusing on the meta-cognition of control, the fifth study investigated the impact of need for cognition on metacontrol (switching to accurate but cognitively effortful strategies), in a sequential decision-making task. A computational reinforcement-learning model was used to explore this relation.
From (epi)genetics to cognition 
8:30 - 10:00Pleasure, joy, and positive feelings – perception, experience, and modulation of positive affective states in healthy women and men
Ort: Hormones and emotions
Chair der Sitzung: Lydia Kogler, Universitätsklinikum Tübingen
Chair der Sitzung: Bernadette von Dawans, Trier University
Perception and experience of positive, pleasurable, or joyful affective states is dysfunctional in many mental disorders. Considering these transdiagnostic reports, the thorough exploration of physiological and neural correlates of positive affective states in healthy women and men is essential to further understand their contribution to mental health and well-being. Our symposium brings together scientists from four international research institutions (Aarhus, Leipzig, Tübingen, Zürich) to present their research on different aspects of positive affective states and to increase the awareness for these states. In more detail, the symposium discusses insights into sexual functioning in association with the CAG-repeat polymorphism, testosterone, and well-being in men’s health (Andreas Walther) as well as the neural correlates of reward processing and their potential modulation by selective-serotonin-reuptake-inhibitors (escitalopram) in women and men (Carolin Lewis). It further outlines the empathy-related concept of kama muta and the physiological correlates of heartwarming feelings and being moved in women and men (Janis Zickfeld). Finally, the effects of positive self-instruction and self-praise on the neural, physiological, and subjective reactions to social evaluation in women will be characterized (Lydia Kogler). Together, the symposium highlights the relevance of positive, pleasurable, and joyful affective states for mental health and well-being and depicts possible pharmacological and cognitive interventions to modulate their perception. The invited experts will discuss subjective, hormonal, physiological, and neural correlates of positive affective states and potential clinical implications to improve well-being.
Hormones and emotions 
8:30 - 10:00Oscillatory contributions to successful memory formation
Ort: Learning, memory, and sleep
Chair der Sitzung: Marit Petzka, University of Birmingham
Chair der Sitzung: Sven Paẞmann, Universität Fribourg
Brain oscillations are a necessity to form new memories. They are fundamentally involved in all phases supporting successful memory formation, i.e. maintenance, encoding, transfer and consolidation. To gain a better understanding of successful memory formation, examining the functional role of different frequency bands in all phases of memory formation and across different age groups is essential, as their contribution can differ. For example, theta and gamma band activity are known for their involvement in information transfer, while spindles and delta band activity play important roles in consolidation. The same oscillatory patterns may also serve distinct functions in different phases of memory formation. We aim to give a coherent picture about the involvement of brain oscillations across phases of successful memory formation by focusing on two experimental approaches: First, examining endogenous brain oscillations and second, manipulating brain oscillations using e.g., transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) in which a sinusoidal current oscillating at a specific frequency is applied. In our symposium, Monika Schönauer will present new findings about oscillatory mechanisms underlying working memory maintenance. Anna Karlsson found that modulations in theta and alpha activity lead to different outcomes in memory formation in older compared with younger adults. Sandrine Baselgia will present a tACS-based study showing a functional role of theta in the encoding of acoustically presented word pairs, and Sven Paẞmann will present preliminary results of the same approach during sleep-dependent consolidation. Marit Petzka will present how sleep spindles track encoding patterns in favour of memory consolidation.
Learning, memory, and sleep 
8:30 - 10:00Cognition and plasticity in the aging brain
Ort: Clinical challenges and the ageing brain
Chair der Sitzung: Sandra Martin, Max-Planck-Institut für Kognitions- und Neurowissenschaften, Leipzig
Chair der Sitzung: Anna Rysop, Max-Planck-Institut für Kognitions- und Neurowissenschaften, Leipzig
Aging is accompanied by a myriad of cognitive changes. A growing body of research addresses the underlying neural reorganization processes at structural and functional levels. Furthermore, the development of non-invasive brain stimulation techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has sparked interest in their potential to counteract cognitive decline in aging by inducing neural plasticity. Our symposium examines age-dependent alterations on structural and functional levels with a particular focus on neural network dynamics by presenting novel data from a variety of cognitive domains. Moreover, the potential of non-invasive brain stimulation to attenuate cognitive decline in aging is discussed. Linda Geerligs unravels the interplay of age-related changes in brain structure and function. By using cross-sectional and longitudinal data, she demonstrates how structural and functional connectivity decouple with advancing age and how this relates to cognition. Sandra Martin provides insight on neural aging in the domain of semantic cognition. She shows how the behavioral relevance of functional connectivity within and between domain-general networks is modulated by age. Anna Rysop discusses age-related changes in neural network dynamics during speech in noise comprehension. Using individualized stimuli, she explores commonalities and differences in the use of semantic context to aid comprehension. Friederike Thams provides novel evidence for the potential of a cognitive training accompanied by tDCS in older adults with and without cognitive impairments. Pooling insight from behavioral and neuroimaging data, she discusses possible plasticity-induced effects of the intervention. We envisage a controversial and fruitful discussion of conceptual and methodological links between these approaches.
Clinical challenges and the ageing brain 
8:30 - 10:00Reproducibility and transparency in EEG research: current developments
Ort: Perspectives in neuroscience
Chair der Sitzung: Gisela H. Govaart, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig
Chair der Sitzung: Mariella Paul, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
In electrophysiological research, researchers have to make a myriad of decisions when going from raw data to interpretations (“analytic flexibility”), including many preprocessing steps and possible analysis methods. These decisions are not always transparently reported. In addition, researchers’ decisions might be unconsciously biased by seeing the data. In this symposium, we aim to (1) demonstrate how variable preprocessing and analysis pipelines in EEG research are and how this influences study outcomes, and (2) discuss possibilities to increase transparent reporting and decrease bias in making analytic decisions, and, thereby, increase reproducibility of EEG studies. Regarding the first aim, two of the talks in this symposium will demonstrate the high variability of methodological choices in EEG research and how this influences results, using both local and large-scale (“many analysts”) approaches. Turning to the second aim, discussing possible solutions, the third talk will focus on how preregistration can help increase transparency in EEG research and reduce researcher biases in analytic choices. The fourth talk will discuss another way to increase transparency, through developing concrete reporting guidelines in the form of checklists. Finally, we will discuss the current state of transparency and reproducibility in EEG research. We will highlight both possibilities and challenges in the adoption of reproducible and transparent practices in the EEG community, as well as the growing role of collaborative efforts in our research field.
Perspectives in neuroscience 
8:30 - 10:00Neural representations of task sets and their implications for human multitasking
Ort: Attention and perception
Chair der Sitzung: Marie Mückstein, IPU Berlin
Chair der Sitzung: Christine Stelzel, IPU Berlin
The capability of the human brain to process multiple tasks simultaneously is limited, as manifested in speed and accuracy decrements for concurrent task performance. Several factors might contribute to this processing limitation, one of which being the representational overlap of the tasks (Klingberg, 1998). While some fMRI studies provide evidence for the role of overlapping brain activity in multitasking using activation-based univariate analysis approaches, more recently multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) has been applied to decode activity patterns related to task-set representations in the brain. In this symposium, we aim to gain an advanced perspective on the role of neural task-set representations for performance decrements during concurrent or sequential task execution with a focus on MVPA. In the first talk, a general perspective will be outlined on how task representations change in the fronto-parietal cortex when the task context, in terms of cognitive demands, task switches, or rewards is being manipulated. The second contribution will focus on how individuals develop the ability to switch between tasks, emphasizing the difference in task representations between children and adults. The remaining two talks will shed light on the relationship between the overlap of task representations and observed dual-task costs in fronto-parietal as well as in sensory processing regions. In the following discussion, we will integrate the various perspectives to conclude with implications for the use of MVPA in multitasking research, and identify perspectives for future research.
Attention and perception 
10:00 - 10:15Kaffeepause
Ort: Coffee Lounge gather.town
Coffee Lounge gather.town 
10:15 - 11:45Nature meets Nurture: Elucidating the liability for mental disorders through imaging genomics, epigenetics, and gene-by-environment interactions
Ort: From (epi)genetics to cognition
Chair der Sitzung: Philippe Jawinski, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Chair der Sitzung: Miriam Schiele, Universitätsklinikum Freiburg
Over the past decade, molecular genetic research has seen rapid advances in the identification of replicable variations associated with mental disorders. Although genetic predispositions impact human behavior throughout the lifespan, the development and course of diseases also crucially relies on environmental conditions. This symposium presents four studies using state-of-the-art imaging genomic, epigenetic and gene-by-environment methods to unravel the mechanisms through which genes increase the risk for psychopathology. The first talk focuses on how genetics affect the speed of biological ageing as one of the greatest ubiquitous risk factors for disease vulnerability: Philippe Jawinski (HU Berlin) presents results from N = 42,000 participants of the UK Biobank imaging cohort, suggesting that the biological age of the brain (‘brain age’) genetically overlaps with various physical and mental health phenotypes. Following this, Lea Sirignano (ZI Mannheim) reports on a longitudinal study that examines genetic response predictors and gene expression changes after therapeutic sleep deprivation in depression. The next talk is held by Miriam Schiele (UKL Freiburg), who reports on gene-by-environment interactions in anxiety and how protective coping abilities may exert a buffering effect on the interplay of genetic disposition and environmental adversity. Finally, Martin Reuter (Uni Bonn) presents on the relation between social cognitive functioning and genetic and epigenetic serotonergic markers, which have been associated with affective processes in the normal and psychopathological range. This symposium seeks to demonstrate, discuss, and disseminate the rapidly growing opportunities to elucidate the liability for mental disorders by applying molecular genetic techniques in our field.
From (epi)genetics to cognition 
10:15 - 11:45Erotic stimuli and sexuality in (biological) psychology
Ort: Hormones and emotions
Chair der Sitzung: Birgit Derntl, Universität Tübingen
Chair der Sitzung: Jana Strahler, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen
Sexual health crucially contributes to mental health as it may complement physical, emotional and social health but can also be associated with distress, pain and dysfunctional reward. Most of our knowledge today on erotic stimuli processing stems from studies on males only. To better understand (dys)functional processes in the realm of sexual health, we need to come up with study designs that involve women and men also by incorporating stimuli that are sexually arousing to all genders. We will start with a study addressing a very timely aspect, i.e. pornography consumption during the COVID 19 pandemic. Here, Sarah Golder* (Gießen) will introduce the study design and present first data. While in the first talk recipients were mostly watching erotic stimuli alone, Katherine Hertlein (Salzburg) will show data on how collective pornography consumption affects heterosexual partnerships in the second talk of our symposium. Next on, Jana Strahler (Gießen) will present new data on influencing factors on sexual cue responsivity in men such as negative affect, while in our last talk, Ann-Christin Kimmig* (Tübingen) will highlight the neural circuits underlying approach-avoidance behavior to erotic stimuli in naturally cycling women and women taking oral contraceptives. With this symposium we want to highlight the relevance of investigating sexual health in women and men, as this critical aspect of mental health has far reaching individual, societal and clinical consequences that by now, however, are only poorly understood. * PhD students
Hormones and emotions 
10:15 - 11:45Mechanisms of associative learning: From simple habits to sophisticated cognitive maps
Ort: Learning, memory, and sleep
Chair der Sitzung: Lennart Luettgau, University College London
Chair der Sitzung: Stephan Nebe, Universität Zürich
Associative learning is a fundamental mechanism by which organisms form representations of relationships between stimuli and actions. In recent years, reformulations of well-established concepts of associative learning have shaped our understanding of how higher-order cognitive processes might emerge from simpler cognitive and learning mechanisms. This symposium encompasses five presentations of early-career researchers that highlight recent developments in the investigation of associative learning with a variety of cognitive, computational, and neuroscientific methods, ranging from virtual reality, cognitive-computational modeling, multivariate decoding of neural representations in fMRI data to ecological momentary assessment using cross-platform online applications. First, Stephan Nebe will introduce new experimental approaches and computational models for the laboratory assessment of habits quantifying the influence of past behavioral frequency on future actions. Lennart Luettgau will present evidence for cortical reinstatement of outcome representations as a mechanism underlying associative learning transfer, applying cross-session, cross-modality multivariate pattern analyses on fMRI data. Mona Garvert will highlight a study combining virtual reality, computational modeling, and fMRI to investigate how humans use relational knowledge organized in cognitive maps to generalize value to states that were previously not experienced. Eric Schulz will follow presenting computational modeling of a compositional bandit task, in which humans entertain compositional representations and a grammar over these structures, to show performance exceeding neural network models. Finally, Monja Neuser will present longitudinal data of a novel reward learning task complemented by ecological momentary assessment acquired with an open-source cross-platform application, informing the creation of better models of human behavior.
Learning, memory, and sleep 
10:15 - 11:45Pain in the brain - Factors influencing pain perception and its modulation
Ort: Clinical challenges and the ageing brain
Chair der Sitzung: Marian van der Meulen, University of Luxembourg
The way noxious stimuli are perceived is highly dependent on factors, such as the current attentional state or expectations about the painful event. Distraction from pain and placebo analgesia are prominent examples for this cognitive modulation of pain. Although these are generally very powerful mechanisms of pain modulation, prior studies have found considerable interindividual variations in the magnitude of the modulatory effect, while little is known about the influencing factors. Here, we present a series of studies on cognitive and situational factors influencing pain perception and its modulation on the behavioural and (neuro)physiological level. A special focus is on the role of age-related changes, since little is known about a potentially altered “top-down” control of pain in old age, albeit this population is disproportionately affected by pain and its consequences. Ana María González Roldán presents a study on age-related changes in pain processing and associated resting-state functional connectivity of regions implicated in pain processing. Turning to cognitive distraction from pain, Katharina Rischer discusses age-related neural changes and the role of executive functions therein. Complementary, Elisabeth Holl reports on the analgesic response and associated changes in heart rate and electrodermal activity in young adults, playing a distracting virtual reality game. The impact of age on the processing of acute pain and on its neural correlates is addressed by Angelika Dierolf. Shervin Vencatachellum discusses the role of mindfulness in shaping expectations about pain, by considering recent neuroimaging insights within the interoceptive predictive coding framework.
Clinical challenges and the ageing brain 
10:15 - 11:45Chances and challenges of non-invasive neuromodulation to improve recovery of function
Ort: Perspectives in neuroscience
Chair der Sitzung: Christiane Thiel, Universität Oldenburg
Chair der Sitzung: Christian Grefkes, Uniklinik Köln
Non-invasive neuromodulation has gained increasing attention because of its potential to promote recovery of function after damage to the central nervous system. Though electrical and magnetic stimulation or neurofeedback are promising approaches for clinical neuropsychology, they are faced with a number of challenges. These include large interindividual variability and small overall effects as well as insufficient knowledge on the neural mechanisms that co-occur with improvement of function. The current symposium brings together experts from different areas of neuromodulation and cognitive neuroscience. We will discuss recent approaches on how to best implement the different techniques in the context of neurorehabilitation. Maike Mustin (Köln) will present data on how neuromodulatory techniques like transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be used in stroke patients to unravel the role of different brain areas in the lesioned and contralesional hemisphere for motor performance and recovery. Mareike Daeglau (Oldenburg) will focus on research studying how context factors affect the neural signal used in motor imagery neurofeedback. Gesa Hartwigsen (Leipzig) will present an overview of how electric and magnetic neuromodulation impacts plasticity in the language network in health and disease. Finally, Florian Kasten (Oldenburg) will address how the integration of electrical field modelling and neuroimaging can help to explain interindividual variability in the effects of electrical brain stimulation. We envisage a controversial and fruitful discussion and hope to promote the application of non-invasive neuromodulation techniques in neurorehabilitation research.
Perspectives in neuroscience 
10:15 - 11:45Naturalistic neuroscience – an emerging field for studying the human brain
Ort: Attention and perception
Chair der Sitzung: Lisa Mochalski, Forschungszentrum Jülich
Methodological advances and their resulting observations shape the gain of knowledge on the human brain and behavior. The functional architecture of the brain has been studied extensively using task-based and resting-state fMRI studies, which grant insight into the network organization of the brain. However, these techniques for studying the brain possess limited ecological validity, which may restrict their generalizability. Recent years have seen rising interest in naturalistic stimuli – such as movies or auditory narratives – to increase the ecological validity of laboratory research. Naturalistic stimuli are complex, dynamic and continuous, which more strongly imitates daily life experiences and allows the study of the brain in a more natural environment. This symposium will introduce naturalistic stimuli and their advantages compared to more established paradigms (Christian Häusler). We will compare test-retest reliability of movie-fMRI and resting-state fMRI (Dr. Xing Qian). Furthermore, we will explore the usability of movie fMRI for the study of inter-individual differences in functional networks (Jean-Phillipe Kröll) and the general functional topography (Dr. Xuan Li). Lastly, we will present the usage of auditory narratives to map the individual language network (Dr. Martin Wegrzyn). We will end with a plenum-discussion on the interpretation and potential future of this exciting new field.
Attention and perception 
11:45 - 12:00Kaffeepause
Ort: Coffee Lounge gather.town
Coffee Lounge gather.town 
12:00 - 12:45Meet-the-Professor
Ort: Meet-the-Professor
Chair der Sitzung: Alexander Lischke, Medical School Hamburg
Chair der Sitzung: Gesa Hartwigsen, Max-Planck-Institut für Kognitions- und Neurowissenschaften, Leipzig
Die DGPs Fachgruppe Biologische Psychologie und Neuropsychologie bietet dieses Jahr wieder ein Meet the Professor an, bei dem sich Doktoranden und Postdocs mit Professoren austauschen können. Es werden verschiedene Professoren ihre Expertise anbieten, um den Doktoranden und Postdocs zu forschungsspezifischen (Imaging, Psychophysiology etc.) und karrierespezifischen (Open Science, Work Life Balance, Gender Equality etc.) Fragen zu beraten. Die Experten wurden auf Wunsch der Jungmitglieder der DGPs Fachgruppe und der DGPA ausgewählt. Das Meeting wird am Donnerstag, den 3. Juni von 12:00-12:45 Uhr stattfinden. Fragen zum Meeting können an den Jungmitgliedervertreter der Fachgruppe, Prof. Alexander Lischke (alexander.lischke@medicalschool-hamburg.de), gestellt werden. • Prof. Birgit Derntl (Universität Tübingen) Research Expertise: Neuroendocrinology, Imaging (MRI), Social Cognition • PD Gesa Hartwigsen (Max-Planck-Institut Leipzig) Research Expertise: Brain Stimulation (TMS/TDCS), Neuroimaging (fMRI, EEG), Cognition, Plasticity, Stroke Career Expertise: Early Career Support, Career Transition (Max Planck Institute), Women in Science, Leadership Questions, International Grant Applications • Prof. Stefanie Höhl (Universität Wien) Research Expertise: Imaging (fNIRS, EEG, Hyperscanning), Infant Research, Social-Cognitive Development Career Expertise: Early Career Support, Career Transition (Max Planck Institute), Women in Science, Gender Equality, Work Life Balance (Parenting), International Networking • Prof. Robert Kumsta (Universität Bochum) Research Expertise: Genetics, Epigenetics, Gene-Environment Interplay, Stress, Career Expertise: International Mobility • Prof. Andrea Kübler (Universität Würzburg) Research Expertise: Brain Computer Interface, Neurofeedback, Open Science, Mindfulness Career Expertise: Early Career Support, Women in Science, Gender Equality, Misconduct • Prof. Alexander Lischke (Medical School Hamburg) Research Expertise: Social Cognition, Neuroendocrinology, Psychophysiology, Experimental Psychopathology, Psychiatry Career Expertise: Early Career Support, Career Transition (Private University), Application for Professorship, Psychotherapeutic Training • Prof. Daniela Mier (Universität Konstanz) Research Expertise: Imaging (fMRI), Psychiatry, Social Cognition Career Expertise: Early Career Support, Women in Science, Psychotherapeutic Training • Prof. Martin Reuter (Universität Bonn) Research Expertise: Genetics, Neuroendocrinology, Decision Making, Addiction, Individual Differences Career Expertise: Early Career Support, Career Transition (Public University), Negotiations Appointment for Professorship • Prof. Anja Strobel (Technische Universität Chemnitz) Research Expertise: Open Science Career Expertise: Early Career Support, Women in Science, Gender Equality, Work Life Balance • Prof. Matthias Wieser (Erasmus University Rotterdam) Research Expertise: Imaging (EEG), Psychophysiology, Experimental Psychopathology Career Expertise: Early Career Support, Career Transition (International University), International Mobility
Meet-the-Professor 
12:00 - 13:00Mittagspause
 
13:00 - 13:15DGPs & DGPA Preise 2020
Ort: Plenum
Chair der Sitzung: Gesa Hartwigsen, Max-Planck-Institut für Kognitions- und Neurowissenschaften, Leipzig
Chair der Sitzung: Martin Herrmann, Universitätsklinikum Würzburg
Plenum 
13:15 - 14:15Hauptvortrag - Ulrike Lüken
Ort: Plenum
Chair der Sitzung: Birgit Derntl, Universität Tübingen
Optimizing psychological treatments: from mechanisms to predictions to clinical utility
Although psychological treatments including cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) work in principle to improve mental health, it appears not to work equally well for everyone: recent evidence shows that nearly every second patient suffering from an anxiety disorder fails to benefit in a clinically meaningful way - with severe consequences for patients and increasing costs for societies. Precision mental health aims to identify patients at risk for non-response already prior to treatment initialization and to improve treatments based on an in-depth mechanistic understanding. During the first part of this lecture, I will give insights into putative mechanisms that may predispose patients not to benefit from CBT, focusing on emotion regulation and its neurobiological underpinnings. In the second part, we will shift to the field of predictive analytics and its application to the prediction of treatment outcome (theranostics). Third, initial evidence and first ideas (including ethical considerations) how to implement such a theranostic pipeline into clinical utility will be discussed.
Plenum 
14:15 - 14:30Kaffeepause
Ort: Coffee Lounge gather.town
Coffee Lounge gather.town 
14:30 - 16:00Aktuelle methodische Ansätze in der Genetik und Epigenetik - der Nutzen von GWAS, Polygenic Scores und Netzwerkanalysen
Ort: From (epi)genetics to cognition
Chair der Sitzung: Robert Kumsta, Ruhr-Universität Bochum
Chair der Sitzung: Erhan Genc, Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors Dortmund (IfADo)
Genomweite Assoziationsstudien (GWAS) sind ein wichtiges Werkzeug in der Erforschung genetischer Grundlagen komplexer Eigenschaften. Neben der klassischen Anwendung, hypothesenfrei Zusammenhänge zwischen genetischen Varianten und psychologischen Eigenschaften herzustellen, bieten neue methodische Ansätze die Möglichkeit, bestehende Studienergebnisse von GWAS für eigene Studien zu nutzen. Ein vielversprechender Ansatz sind sogenannte Polygene Scores - Summenwerte, die über GWAS Statistiken individuell bestimmt werden und als Prädiktoren herangezogen werden können. Erhan Genç wird zeigen, dass der Zusammenhang zwischen Polygenen Scores für Intelligenz und IQ über die Effizienz struktureller Konnektivität insbesondere fronto-parietaler Regionen vermittelt wird. Fabian Streit stellt eine GWAS zur Borderline-Persönlichkeitsstörung vor, und wird anhand von Polygenen Scores und genetischen Korrelationen zeigen, inwieweit sich über ein geteiltes genetisches Risiko auf gemeinsame biologische Grundlagen mit anderen Störungsbildern und Traits schließen lässt. Eine weitere Betrachtungsebene stellen epigenetische Mechanismen dar. Ungünstige Umwelterfahrungen besonders in frühen Entwicklungsphasen können zu stabilen Veränderungen der DNA Methylierung und der Regulation der Genexpression führen. Linda Dieckmann untersuchte inwieweit sogenannte epigenetic clocks, mittels derer sich Abweichungen zwischen chronologischem und epigenetischem Alter bestimmen lassen, Einblicke in die frühkindliche Entwicklung und die Transmission pränataler Risikofaktoren geben können. Katharina Mattonet wird einen systemorientierten Ansatz darstellen der über die Betrachtung von ko-methylierten Genen die Regulation des gesamten Genoms in Betracht zieht. Der Ansatz wird an Hand einer Studie vorgestellt, die den Zusammenhang zwischen pränataler Schadstoffexposition und genomweiter DNA Methylierung untersucht. Abschließend wird Johannes Zang den Zusammenhang zwischen Therapieerfolg nach stationären Behandlung bei Posttraumatischer Belastungsstörung und Veränderung von genomweiten GenKoexpressionsmustern darstellen.
From (epi)genetics to cognition 
14:30 - 16:00Role of emotion and arousal in shaping our cognition and behavior: Recent methodological developments and emerging perspectives
Ort: Hormones and emotions
Chair der Sitzung: Michiko Sakaki, University of Tübingen
Chair der Sitzung: Mathias Weymar, Universität Potsdam
Decades of research have investigated how our emotion and arousal interact with cognition and behavior. Nevertheless, we still have many unanswered questions that span from basic underlying mechanisms to the effects of emotion in real-life social interactions. Recent technological and methodological advances have enabled us to tackle some of these questions with novel and multi-method approaches. This symposium will highlight such methodological advances in research on emotion, arousal and cognition. In five different talks, we will bring together different methods, covering the transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation, pupillometry, pharmacological manipulation, Virtual Reality, and machine learning in neuroimaging. Mathias Weymar will present research on the vagus nerve stimulation and discuss its effects on emotional memory. Jan Willem de Gee will present cross-species data with mice and humans, and discuss how similarly pupil-linked arousal affects decision making across different species. Ulrike Rimmele will present data on the effects of pharmacological cortisol manipulations on emotional episodic memory. Leon Kroczek will discuss how facial emotions of others alter our social behavior based on his data from Virtual Reality and a computer experiment. Finally, Michiko Sakaki will present machine-learning applications to resting-state fMRI data in understanding individual differences in emotional memory. By bringing those diverse perspectives together, this symposium will aim to provide an opportunity for lively discussions concerning their contributions to our understanding of how emotion and arousal affect human cognitive processing and behavior.
Hormones and emotions 
14:30 - 16:00Challenges and opportunities of practicing open and reproducible research in biological psychology
Ort: IGOR
Chair der Sitzung: Gordon Feld, Zentralinstitut für Seelische Gesundheit - Universität Heidelberg
Chair der Sitzung: Tina Lonsdorf, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf
This symposium is organized by members of the ‘Interest Group for Open and Reproducible Research (IGOR)” within the DGPs Section Biological Psychology and Neuropsychology. It covers empirical evaluations and case reports of preregistration, data sharing, ethical considerations as well as new methods developed to enhance reproducibility of research in Biological Psychology. First, Rachel Sjouwerman illustrates how a single raw data set can give rise to a multitude (i.e., ‘multiverse’) of processed data sets due to the co-existence of multiple alternative and equally reasonable processing pipelines using skin conductance responses as an example. She demonstrates a novel way of meeting the resulting challenge of unclear comparability and robustness across pipelines by using a multiverse-type of analysis. Second, Gordon Feld introduces a case study of a complex biological psychology experiment submitted as a Registered Report. He demonstrates how a failure to derive the experiment clearly from a sound theoretical basis may impede the probability of success. Third, Christian Paret presents results from an Online Survey on Open Science Practices in Neuroimaging Research. Fourth, Tina Lonsdorf showcases an inventory of ‘open data’ by using fear conditioning research as a case example to illustrate the status quo, current challenges and prospects of data sharing in psychophysiological research. Finally, Christian Merz discusses ethical considerations for data sharing with a focus on Biological Psychology. This symposium showcases current challenges of introducing open and reproducible practices into our research work-flows, derives clear take-home messages and critically discusses the prospects and opportunities of these for advancing the field.
IGOR 
14:30 - 16:00Neuroimaging, genetic and clinical studies of oculomotor control
Ort: Clinical challenges and the ageing brain
Chair der Sitzung: Ulrich Ettinger, Universität Bonn
Chair der Sitzung: Christoph Klein, Universitätsklinikum Freiburg
The oculomotor system provides a rich microcosm for the study of perception, cognition and motor control. In this symposium, we will provide a state-of-the-art overview of the neural and genetic correlates of eye movements as well as their disorders in psychiatric and neurological disorders. Rebekka Schröder (Psychology/Bonn) will present fMRI data of the neural networks underlying smooth pursuit eye movements in healthy volunteers. Functional connectivity analysis shows that key oculomotor areas display widespread, but only partly overlapping patterns of connectivity. Mark Greenlee (Psychology/Regensburg) will report on fMRI studies investigating the neural correlates of visually-guided and memory-guided saccades. Comparisons of BOLD response between these types of paradigms will be made. Annabell Coors (DZNE/Bonn) will present molecular genetic data on oculomotor endophenotypes for schizophrenia. In N=3000 adults, higher polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia were associated with higher antisaccade error rate, latency and smooth pursuit velocity gain, but lower antisaccade amplitude gain. Daniela Canu (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Freiburg) will talk about microsaccade and saccade generation in neurodevelopmental disorders, including early-onset schizophrenia, autism and ADHD. Results suggest the presence of inhibition deficits across clinical groups, suggesting common (pre-)frontal functional impairments. Finally, Chrystalina Antoniades (Clinical Neurosciences/Oxford) will present data from a movement disorders cohort including Parkinson’s disease and progressive supranuclear palsy (N=1400) to illustrate how eye movement parameters have proven a useful translational tool in aiding clinical diagnosis and following disease progression. Overall, this symposium will combine multiple methodological approaches to shed light on human oculomotor control as well as its alterations in disease.
Clinical challenges and the ageing brain 
14:30 - 16:00Modulation emotionaler Effekte mittels nicht invasiver Hirnstimulation
Ort: Perspectives in neuroscience
Chair der Sitzung: Stephanie Böhme, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg
Chair der Sitzung: Martin Herrmann, Universitätsklinikum Würzburg
Bildgebende Studien zeigen, dass phylogenetisch ältere Hirnregionen, wie bspw. limbische Strukturen, direkt mit affektiven Reaktionen in Verbindung gebracht werden können und deren Malfunktion mit pathologischen Lernmechanismen und somit mit psychischen Störungen assoziiert ist. Gleichzeitig sind diese limbischen Regionen mit einem weit verzweigten Netzwerk kortikaler Hirnstrukturen verbunden. Die Aktivierungsänderung in einem Teil führt zu weitreichenden Veränderungen im gesamten neuronalen Netzwerk und der nachgeschalteten Verarbeitung emotionaler Reize. Mittels Methoden der nicht invasiven Hirnstimulation kann die Aktivität in solchen Netzwerken beeinflusst werden und perspektivisch so therapeutisch wertvolles Verlernen maladaptiver emotionaler Prozesse positiv beeinflusst werden. Doch die genauen Mechanismen effektiver nicht invasiver Hirnstimulation bedürfen weiterer Erforschung. Im Symposium werden aktuelle Forschungsergebnisse vorgestellt und diskutiert, wie man emotionale Verarbeitungsprozesse durch nicht invasive Hirnstimulation, wie der transkraniellen Gleichstromstimulation (tDCS: Herrmann et al., Böhme & Mühlberger und Roesmann et al.) oder der vergleichsweise noch wenig erforschten transkraniellen Ultraschall‑Neuromodulation (TUS: Forster et al.), beeinflussen kann. Nach einem kurzen allgemeinen Überblick der verschiedenen nicht invasiven Hirnstimulationstechniken stellen Herrmann und Kollegen im ersten Vortrag Daten zur positiven Beeinflussung der Extinktion einer konsolidierten Furchtreaktion durch eine frontale tDCS vor. Böhme & Mühlberger diskutieren in ihrem Vortrag den Einfluss unterschiedlicher Applikationszeitpunkte einer frontalen tDCS beim Extinktionslernen. Roesmann et al. präsentieren ihre Ergebnisse des differentiellen Einflusses einer hemmenden vs. aktivierenden tDCS auf die Furchtgeneralisierung und abschließend stellen Forster et al. ihre Ergebnisse zum Einfluss einer frontalen TUS auf die erlernte Hilflosigkeit vor.
Perspectives in neuroscience 
14:30 - 16:00Do we see what we expect? Implementation of and learning from visual expectations
Ort: Attention and perception
Chair der Sitzung: Helen Blank, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE)
Chair der Sitzung: Franziska Knolle, Technical University of Munich
Visual perception is an inferential process, in which prior expectations are combined with actual sensory input. How these prior expectations are represented in the brain and how they impact learning or memory of visual stimuli is still debated. Individuals differ substantially in how they weight prior and sensory input, and the inappropriate weighting of those has been linked to clinical conditions. In autism, for example, studies have found an over-weighting of the sensory input and an inability to appropriately evaluate priors, while the findings for psychosis are more controversial, and may shift with disease progression, from over-weighting sensory input in early to over-weighting prior knowledge in later stages. In this symposium, we will tackle some of the open questions by bringing together research on how prior expectations influence visual perception in the healthy brain and clinical conditions, using a variety of methods (behaviour, computational modelling, multivariate fMRI, and MEG). First, Helen Blank (UKE, Hamburg) will discuss how expectations of face-identity are represented and weighted during presentation of context cues and how these expectations influence face processing. Second, Franziska Knolle (TUM, München) will discuss how visual priors are used during stimuli disambiguation in psychosis. Third, Janine Bayer, (UKE, Hamburg) will explain how visual category learning relates to autistic traits. Fourth, Alex Clarke (University, Cambridge) will explore how learned contexts shape the neural reactivation of expected sensory details; and finally, Andrea Greve (MRC, Cambridge) will present behavioural evidence supporting a theoretical framework on expectation violations during learning and memory processes.
Attention and perception 
16:00 - 18:00Postersession 1 - Computational and Neuroimaging Methods
Ort: Postersaal gather.town
Postersaal gather.town 
16:00 - 18:00Postersession 2 - Individual Differences and (Epi)genetics
Ort: Postersaal gather.town
Postersaal gather.town 
16:00 - 18:00Postersession 3 - Learning, Memory
Ort: Postersaal gather.town
Postersaal gather.town 
16:00 - 18:00Postersession 4 - Cognition
Ort: Postersaal gather.town
Postersaal gather.town 
16:00 - 18:00Postersession 5 - Attention, Perception
Ort: Postersaal gather.town
Postersaal gather.town 
16:00 - 18:00Postersession 6 - Brain and Periphery / Neuroendocrinology
Ort: Postersaal gather.town
Postersaal gather.town 
16:00 - 18:00Postersession 7 - Social and Emotional Neuroscience
Ort: Postersaal gather.town
Postersaal gather.town 
16:00 - 18:00Postersession 8 - Development and Ageing
Ort: Postersaal gather.town
Postersaal gather.town 
16:00 - 18:00Postersession 9 - Disorders and Interventions
Ort: Postersaal gather.town
Postersaal gather.town 
18:00 - 19:00Mitgliederversammlung DGPA
Ort: Mitgliederversammlung DGPA
Chair der Sitzung: Hartmut Schächinger, Universität Trier
Chair der Sitzung: Martin Herrmann, Universitätsklinikum Würzburg
Mitgliederversammlung DGPA 
19:00 - 20:00Mitgliederversammlung Fachgruppe DGPs
Ort: Mitgliederversammlung Fachgruppe DGPs
Chair der Sitzung: Paul Pauli, Universität Würzburg
Chair der Sitzung: Gesa Hartwigsen, Max-Planck-Institut für Kognitions- und Neurowissenschaften, Leipzig
Mitgliederversammlung Fachgruppe DGPs 
20:00 - 20:30Eröffnung des Gesellschaftsabends und Preisverleihungen der Jungwissenschaftler
Ort: Plenum
Chair der Sitzung: Barbara Schmidt, Universitätsklinikum Jena
Chair der Sitzung: Maurizio Sicorello, Central Institute of Mental Health
Plenum 
20:30 - 23:00Gesellschaftsabend und Pubquiz
Ort: Ballroom gather.town
Ballroom gather.town 
Datum: Freitag, 04.06.2021
8:30 - 10:00Parsing avenues for future fear conditioning research
Ort: From (epi)genetics to cognition
Chair der Sitzung: Roland Benoit, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig
Chair der Sitzung: Tina Lonsdorf, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf
There is a long tradition of using the experimental paradigm of ‘fear conditioning’ for studying emotional memory processes in general as well as for modelling the development and treatment of anxiety- and stress-related disorders in the laboratory. This symposium takes on some of the methodological and procedural challenges from the past and showcases recent advances for the future of fear conditioning research. First, Maren Klingelhöfer-Jens will scrutinize the rank-stability of skin conductance responses and fear ratings across multiple experimental days and repeated tests of a fear conditioning paradigm. Ann-Kristin Meyer will then take stock of the emerging literature on categorical fear conditioning by reporting the results of a meta-analysis and a replication study. She will argue that this procedure has the potential to bridge the gap between research on implicit and explicit memory systems. Afterwards, Erik Müller will present behavioral, psychophysiological, and EEG evidence that merely imagined events can induce conditioned fear responses much the same way as real US. Finally, Adrian Wroblewski will highlight the value of adopting a network approach for our understanding of the neural basis of fear conditioning. In particular, he will present effective connectivity analyses that make use of dynamic causal modelling to infer directed relationships between individual brain regions. Together, the symposium will present research that outlines emerging future lines of inquiry for the research on fear conditioning.
From (epi)genetics to cognition 
8:30 - 10:00Brain correlates of hormonal contraceptive effects on emotion and cognition
Ort: Hormones and emotions
Chair der Sitzung: Belinda Pletzer, Universität Salzburg
Chair der Sitzung: Ramune Griksiene, Vilnius University
Oral contraceptives just celebrated their 60th anniversary and are used by 150 million women worldwide. First reports that the use of combined oral contraceptives may result in altered mood date back to the 1960s. Yet, the neurobiological correlates of these side effects remain yet to be uncovered. Cognitive effects of oral contraceptives have only been investigated by a handful of studies and came up with inconsistent results due to small sample sizes and a lack of control for the contraceptive formulation used. While most combined oral contraceptives contain the same estrogen (ethinylestradiol), various different progestins are on the market. Some of these progestins act as androgen receptor agonists (androgenic progestins), while others act as androgen receptor antagonists (anti-androgenic progestins). Accordingly, these progestins might elicit different effects in those emotional and cognitive functions, which are influenced by testosterone. Thus, well-powered neuroimaging studies differentiating different contraceptive formulations are needed to understand the neurobiological underpinnings of contraceptive effects on emotion and cognition. Comparing the effects of androgenic and anti-androgenic contraceptives can also help to disentangle those effects that result from the estrogenic actions of contraceptives and those effects that result from the progestin component. In that respect, some light may also be shed by investigating the effects of selective progesterone receptor antagonists on the brain, as these likely oppose the progestagenic effects of hormonal contraceptives. In this symposium, we present current data from various labs involved in contraceptive research aiming to disentangle the various effects of different contraceptive components on the brain.
Hormones and emotions 
8:30 - 10:00How robust are the benefits of sleep on learning and memory?
Ort: Learning, memory, and sleep
Chair der Sitzung: David Philip Morgan, Central Institute of Mental Health
Chair der Sitzung: Gordon Feld, Zentralinstitut für Seelische Gesundheit - Universität Heidelberg
Although the benefits of sleep for memory are well established, recent findings suggest that these effects may be more variable than expected. This symposium attempts to evaluate the robustness of the enhancing effect of sleep on memory. To this end, Chloe Newbury and Sabrina Berres will present two independent meta-analyses of the impact of sleep deprivation vs. wakefulness and sleep vs. wakefulness on declarative memory respectively. Both meta-analyses find that the meta-analytical effect of sleep on memory is not large but rather small to medium sized (approximately d = 0.4). Due to publication bias meta-analyses can inflate effect sizes making replication attempts of previous research necessary. In line with this, some well-known findings in sleep and memory research have proven difficult to replicate conceptually. For instance, David Morgan will present a large-scale (N = 4,000) registered report using online assessment showing no effect of sleep on recognition memory in an eyewitness identification paradigm. Finally, Gordon Feld will present data on an experiment using different word list lengths, which demonstrates the dependence of sleep-dependent memory consolidation on specific context factors. Taken together these findings demonstrate that the effect of sleep on memory may be less robust than expected from the literature. During the discussion, we will outline developments that could increase the robustness of sleep and memory findings in the future.
Learning, memory, and sleep 
8:30 - 10:00The utility of ERPs in clinical psychology: examples from neural correlates of performance monitoring
Ort: Clinical challenges and the ageing brain
Chair der Sitzung: Julia Klawohn, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin
Chair der Sitzung: Anja Riesel, Universität Hamburg
Several forms of psychopathology have been shown to be characterized by aberrant neural correlates of performance-monitoring, including reward, inhibition, and error processing. The current symposium will evaluate new findings on performance-monitoring event-related potentials (ERPs) as markers of mechanisms, risk, and change in relation to depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and excessive behaviors. Raoul Dieterich will present single-trial based associations between neural correlates of feedback and inhibition specific to high binge-watchers compared to non-binge-watching controls, supporting the notion that simultaneous outcome insensitivity and inhibitory deficits may facilitate compulsive watching. Then, Julia Klawohn will present data on impaired reward-processing and emotional reactivity in current depression, demonstrating the utility of these indices for classification and prediction of disorder trajectory. Ellen de Bruijn will present results on social mechanisms in performance-monitoring from an error-responsibility paradigm. Her data indicate that participants with high obsessive-compulsive (OC) characteristics show enhanced error signals to harmful mistakes compared to low OC individuals. Anja Riesel will present data suggesting that the ERN predicts perceived risk and stress during the COVID-19 pandemic. Increased stress was in turn associated with a range of psychopathological symptom dimensions including anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Finally, Luisa Balzus will present results from a sham-controlled crossover-study on the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the medial-frontal cortex applied to target aberrant error monitoring in OCD. Collectively, this symposium highlights the clinical utility of neural correlates of performance-monitoring for improving our understanding of pathomechanisms involved in mental disorders and for identifying targets of innovative intervention approaches.
Clinical challenges and the ageing brain 
8:30 - 10:00Advances in laterality research: Towards a better understanding of hemispheric asymmetries
Ort: Perspectives in neuroscience
Chair der Sitzung: Patrick Friedrich, Forschungszentrum Jülich
Chair der Sitzung: Sebastian Ocklenburg, Ruhr-Universität Bochum
Cognitive functions are partially lateralized towards the left or right halve of our brain. This so-called functional asymmetry is prominently expressed in language processes, visuospatial attention, face recognition, and handedness. The observation that the extent of asymmetries differs in healthy people and that the absence or reversal of asymmetries is associated with psychiatric disorders (e.g., autism, schizophrenia) makes it an essential avenue for understanding cognitive functions in health and disease. Since the second half of the 19th century, researchers strive to understand lateralized functions, their link to psychiatric disorders, and the factors that drive functional asymmetries in the first place. Although these questions are not answered unequivocally, recent advances in our research techniques and theories allow for a better understanding of brain laterality. In this symposium, we will present some of the more recent efforts in laterality research. Starting with the hereditary and environmental factors, we will present studies on the neurogenetic foundation of hemispheric asymmetries (Sebastian Ocklenburg) and the role of stress in atypical laterality of various disorders (Gesa Berretz). Furthermore, we will discuss novel research settings to enhance ecological validity (Julian Packheiser) and utilize machine learning to overcome the limitations of conventional hemispheric comparisons (Patrick Friedrich). Last, we will present a more encompassing view of visual laterality based on the relationship between left-hemispheric and right-hemispheric processes (Sanne Brederoo). We will follow up with a discussion about the possibilities and future direction of laterality research.
Perspectives in neuroscience 
8:30 - 10:00From the heart to the brain: Central nervous effects of cardioafferent signals
Ort: Attention and perception
Chair der Sitzung: Mauro Larrá, Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors (IfADo)
Peripheral bodily processes are conveyed to the brain via several mechanisms promoting psychological and behavioral adaptations. Besides humoral pathways, the impact of neural projections originating from receptors located within the cardiovascular system is currently debated. Accumulating evidence indicates that cardiac activity influences central-nervous processes mediating perception, cognition and emotion. This symposium will cover recent neuroscientific research into such heart-brain interactions ranging from basic perception to psychopathology. Michael Gaebler (Leipzig) will present evidence for a modality-specific cardiac phase bias indicating that increased cardioafferent traffic during systole inhibits somatosensory perception while promoting active visual sampling. Mauro Larra (Dortmund) will present behavioral and EEG studies showing that cardiac activity modulates sensorimotor and cognitive processes underlying stimulus-response-compatibility. Although central-nervous effects of phasic variations in cardioafferent traffic can be revealed by analyzing EEG data time-locked to heartbeats, electrical fields propagated from the heart pose a challenge and Stefan Arnau (Dortmund) will discuss methodological approaches to deal with the cardiac field artifact. Conscious and unconscious perception of heartbeats may also contribute to self-related cognitions and emotions. Aleksandra Herman (Warsaw) will identify neural correlates of heart-focused and tactile-focused attention in a study applying fMRI and a novel heartbeat-detection task. André Schulz (Luxemburg) will focus on psychopathological consequences related to the perception of cardioafferent signals and present new results on heart-beat-evoked potentials and interoception in somatic symptoms. Together, these contributions elucidate how cardioafferent signals influence brain activity as well as the way we feel, perceive and interact with our environment.
Attention and perception 
10:00 - 11:30Posterblitz
Ort: Plenum
Chair der Sitzung: Christine Blume, Universität Basel
Plenum 
10:00 - 11:45Postersession
Ort: Postersaal gather.town
Alle Poster können weiterhin besucht werden. Die Posterpräsentatoren müssen nicht anwesend sein. Die Chat-Funktion in gather.town kann genutzt werden, um Termine mit den Präsentatoren zu vereinbaren.
Postersaal gather.town 
11:30 - 11:45Posterpreise / G. A. Lienert-Stiftung
Ort: Plenum
Chair der Sitzung: Martin Herrmann, Universitätsklinikum Würzburg
Chair der Sitzung: Gesa Hartwigsen, Max-Planck-Institut für Kognitions- und Neurowissenschaften, Leipzig
Plenum 
12:00 - 12:30Round Table - Doktoranden & Postdocs
Ort: Runder Tisch 1
Chair der Sitzung: Andrea Kübler, Universität Würzburg
Chair der Sitzung: Hartmut Schächinger, Universität Trier
Die DGPs Fachgruppe Biologische Psychologie und Neuropsychologie und die Deutsche Gesellschaft für Psychophysiologie und ihre Anwendung bieten dieses Jahr erstmals zwei Roundtables an: einen Roundtable Doktoranden & Postdocs und einen Roundtable New Professors. Damit wollen wir unseren Mitgliedern, die sich in verschiedenen Phasen ihrer Karriere befinden, einen Austausch ermöglichen, der sich an den jeweiligen Bedürfnissen orientiert. Beide Roundtables finden am Freitag, den 4. Juni von 12:00-12:30 Uhr statt.
Der Roundtable Doktoranden & Postdocs richtet sich an Doktoranden, Postdoktoranden, Nachwuchsgruppenleiter und Juniorprofessoren unterhalb der W2-Ebene. Hier steht der Austausch bzgl. der Karriereentwicklung bis zum Erreichen einer W2-Position im Mittelpunkt. Dabei soll vor allem der Austausch mit der Fachgruppe gefördert werden, um Unterstützungs- und Fördermöglichkeiten für den wissenschaftlichen Nachwuchs planen und umsetzen zu können.
Runder Tisch 1 
12:00 - 12:30Round Table - Neuberufene
Ort: Runder Tisch 2
Chair der Sitzung: Gesa Hartwigsen, Max-Planck-Institut für Kognitions- und Neurowissenschaften, Leipzig
Chair der Sitzung: Alexander Lischke, Medical School Hamburg
Die DGPs Fachgruppe Biologische Psychologie und Neuropsychologie und die Deutsche Gesellschaft für Psychophysiologie und ihre Anwendung bieten dieses Jahr erstmals zwei Roundtables an: einen Roundtable Doktoranden & Postdocs und einen Roundtable New Professors. Damit wollen wir unseren Mitgliedern, die sich in verschiedenen Phasen ihrer Karriere befinden, einen Austausch ermöglichen, der sich an den jeweiligen Bedürfnissen orientiert. Beide Roundtables finden am Freitag, den 4. Juni von 12:00-12:30 Uhr statt.
Der Roundtable New Professors richtet sich ausschließlich an Professoren und Arbeitsgruppenleiter ab W2-Ebene, die innerhalb der letzten 2 Jahre ihre Position besetzt haben. Hier steht der Austausch bzgl. der Herausforderungen, die mit der Neubesetzung einer solchen Position verbunden sind, im Mittelpunkt. Dabei soll vor allem der Austausch unterhalb der neuen Professoren und Arbeitsgruppenleiter gefördert werden, um Netzwerke zu bilden, die bei der Ausgestaltung der neubesetzten Position hilfreich sein können. Fragen bzgl. der Roundtables können an den Jungmitgliedervertreter der Fachgruppe, Prof. Alexander Lischke (alexander.lischke@medicalschool-hamburg.de), gestellt werden. Interessierte, die an dem Roundtable New Professors teilnehmen möchten, können sich gerne vorab melden, damit wir den Table entsprechend planen können.
Runder Tisch 2 
12:00 - 13:00Mittagspause
 
12:30 - 13:00Interessensgruppe Offene und Reproduzierbare Forschung (IGOR)
Ort: IGOR
Chair der Sitzung: Gordon Feld, Zentralinstitut für Seelische Gesundheit - Universität Heidelberg
Chair der Sitzung: Tina Lonsdorf, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf
IGOR 
13:00 - 14:30The role of BDNF in vulnerability to and treatment of stress-related disorders
Ort: From (epi)genetics to cognition
Chair der Sitzung: Lara Puhlmann, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig
Chair der Sitzung: Helge Frieling, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover
During adaption to stressors, the brain coordinates appropriate responses through close interaction with peripheral systems. The brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has emerged as a potential mediator of long-term stress and adversity effects that bridges central and peripheral pathways. BDNF is an essential facilitator of neuronal plasticity in the developing and adult brain. Following observations that chronic stress reduces BDNF expression and antidepressant administration increases its synthesis, the neurotrophic hypothesis of depression was formulated. Fifteen years later, epigenetic regulation and expression of BDNF are widely researched in pathways from adversity to neurodegeneration and disorder, and conversely, as biomarkers for treatment response. This symposium discusses recent advances in our understanding of the role of BDNF for the development and treatment of stress-related disorders, from basic research to clinical application. Roman Linz will provide insights into serum BDNF dynamics during acute stress, its relation to salivary cortisol and BDNF associations with hippocampal volume. Exploring mechanisms of resilience, Lara Puhlmann will discuss data showing serum BDNF increases following stress-relieving mental training in healthy adults. Subsequently, Eva Unternaehrer will discuss how psychopathological risk factors, symptoms, and psychological treatment relate to BDNF DNA methylation. Jan Engelmann and colleagues will present data on the role of plasma BDNF levels and BDNF exon IV promotor methylation as predictors for antidepressant treatment response, and for memory and executive dysfunctions, in a large cohort of depressed patients. Helge Frieling will present recent data on the clinical usefulness of BDNF exon IV methylation as marker of resistance towards monoaminergic antidepressants.
From (epi)genetics to cognition 
13:00 - 14:30Societal polarization: psychological and neurobiological approaches
Ort: Hormones and emotions
Chair der Sitzung: Bastian Schiller, University of Freiburg
Chair der Sitzung: Grit Hein, Universität Würzburg
The past decade has been characterized by increasing polarization which recently has sparked global protests in the course of the “Black Lives Matter” movement. One major symptom of this societal polarization is the consolidation of prejudices and stereotypes against individuals from different social groups, and resulting intergroup conflicts with detrimental effects. Reflecting the urgency of the problem, there is an increasing amount of psychological and neuroscience research that strives to uncover the mechanisms that drive societal polarization and to develop approaches that counteract them. Our symposium brings together scientists from four countries (Canada, China, UK, Germany) and five different universities (Alberta, Peking, Bristol, Freiburg, Würzburg) that investigate different aspects of societal polarization related to intergroup processes. In more detail, our symposium provides insights into the neuroendocrinological basis of intergroup conflict (Bastian Schiller), elucidates how neural activities involved in racial categorization affects racial biases in face perception and altruistic decisions (Yuqing Zhou, junior scientist), and discusses cognitive biases and stereotypes in the context of vicarious interracial contact (Susanne Quadflieg). Exploring the promises and limits of intergroup contact further, we will discuss whether and how intergroup toleration affects basic neural signatures and attitudes towards minorities (Kyle Nash), and how neural learning from positive outgroup experiences shape prosocial motivation and the outcome of clinical treatments (Grit Hein). Together, the presentations of the invited experts provide insights into the psychological and neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to societal polarization, show their effect on perception, cognition, and decision-making, and explore approaches that may counteract these effects.
Hormones and emotions 
13:00 - 14:30Dynamic shaping of memory representations by physiological and cognitive processes
Ort: Learning, memory, and sleep
Chair der Sitzung: Svenja Brodt, Universität Tübingen
Chair der Sitzung: Monika Schönauer, University of Freiburg
Not only do our memories shape how we perceive and interact with the world, they themselves are influenced by many factors, both internal and external. Innovative experimental designs, analysis approaches and human neuroimaging methods allow us to investigate the dynamics of how memory representations evolve and change in bilateral interaction with other cognitive and physiological processes. In this symposium, we present data from five labs, each focusing on different modulators of internal representations. We will first highlight physiological determinants of hippocampal function in ageing, based on data from various neuroimaging modalities. To these ends, we will show how differences in hippocampal vascularization patterns impact memory and cognitive functioning. Moreover, we will present data showing that Alzheimer’s disease pathology differentially affects object and scene memory. Secondly, we will discuss how episodic simulation can shape real-life attitudes: mentally associating existing memory representations can lead to a transfer of affective valence to a previously neutral stimulus, resulting in both behavioral and physiological changes. Finally, we will focus on cognitive factors that support the emergence of neocortical memory representations. A first contribution leverages multivariate pattern analysis to show how the neocortex is able to rapidly acquire content-specific representations through repeated rehearsal. We will also present data on how sleep supports neocortical memory formation by shifting subcortical contributions to mnemonic processing during retrieval.
Learning, memory, and sleep 
13:00 - 14:30Neurobiological markers for psychotherapy response
Ort: Clinical challenges and the ageing brain
Chair der Sitzung: Elisabeth Leehr, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster
Chair der Sitzung: Miriam Schiele, Universitätsklinikum Freiburg
Psychotherapy research has shown efficacy for numerous psychotherapeutic interventions, however, about one-third of patients do not respond to psychotherapeutic treatment to a clinically significant degree. Treatment non-response involves severe consequences for patients and confers a high socioeconomic burden. A precise prediction of individual treatment response offers the chance to optimize individual treatment selection and to thus prevent patients from prolonged suffering. Accordingly, the identification of valid (bio)markers as correlates and predictors of clinically meaningful endpoints has become central to the field of psychotherapy. In recent years, research into neurobiological markers of psychotherapy response has yielded promising results. In this symposium, we will present some of the recent advances regarding neurobiological response markers in different mental disorders. Miriam Schiele will review recent findings on epigenetic mechanisms in anxiety- and stress-related disorders including panic disorder, specific phobia and obsessive-compulsive disorder as well as regarding their potential as predictors and dynamic correlates of clinical response to psychotherapy. Elisabeth Leehr will illustrate the protocol of a proof of principle study investigating the a priori prediction of treatment outcomes in specific phobia and will present preliminary clinical and brain structural data. Kati Roesmann will give insights into electromagnetic signatures of fear generalization in relation to response to exposure therapy in patients with spider phobia. Utilizing electroencephalography, Kathrin Schag will present information processing markers relevant for treatment response to a combined neuromodulation and inhibition training addressing cognitive control in patients binge eating disorder.
Clinical challenges and the ageing brain 
13:00 - 14:30Network neuroscience approaches in psychological science: a connectionist perspective on the biological bases of attention, cognitive ability, and on clinical disease
Ort: Perspectives in neuroscience
Chair der Sitzung: Kirsten Hilger, University of Würzburg
Chair der Sitzung: Sebastian Markett, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin
Network Neuroscience, a scientific discipline positioned on the border between brain sciences and physical network theory, has recently been introduced as promising approach into psychological research. This symposium presents four studies that apply network neuroscience methods to different brain imaging modalities to gain insights into various aspects of the human mind. After a brief introduction into basics of network theory, Sebastian Markett reports results from a combined task- and resting-state fMRI study (N = 78) that challenges key assumptions of attention network theory. The second talk transitions from specific cognitive processes to individual differences in cognitive ability. Kirsten Hilger presents results from two fMRI studies (N = 281) suggesting brain network dynamics, especially in the dorsal attention network, to be associated with individual variations in general intelligence. Moreover, specific features of network dynamics are derived that allow to predict individual intelligence scores in independent subjects (N = 831) from only 5% of fMRI resting-state data. Erhan Genc demonstrates the predictive power of structural network architecture derived from DTI (N = 324) for individual variations in knowledge. Finally, Urs Braun introduces network approaches to the investigation of clinical populations. Different concepts of network dysfunction are presented with an exemplary focus on schizophrenia and dopamine function. Finally, opportunities and limits of network neuroscience approaches are discussed within an open panel.
Perspectives in neuroscience 
13:00 - 14:30Faces in context: Bottom-up and top-down influences on face perception
Ort: Attention and perception
Chair der Sitzung: Julia Baum, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Chair der Sitzung: Rasha Abdel Rahman, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
The way we process and evaluate other’s faces depends not only on the face alone, but also on the situational context, our goals and experiences, and what we know about the person. In this symposium five talks highlight different aspects of face processing in context, ranging from task-related over knowledge-based effects to encounters in real-life situations. Enya Weidner presents data from intracranial amygdala recordings investigating the mechanisms and time-course underlying the interaction of goal-directed attention and emotional processing. Employing ERPs, the next talks focus on how learning history shapes face processing. Anne Schacht shows how expression-induced salience and learning through conditioning modulate the processing of faces. Next, Julia Baum shows how more complex learning of verbal emotional information influences the processing of faces varying in attractiveness. Zooming out, we ask whether our understanding of face and emotion processing can benefit from putting faces back onto the body – as in real-life situations. Kirsten Stark used videos of real-life intense emotional reactions to show how the affective valence communicated by the body interacts with the recognition of facial expressions. Noga Ensenberg then provides evidence on how strongly the context influences what we read from a face depends on individual differences between perceivers. Taken together, our symposium challenges the traditional assumption that faces are processed in relative isolation, demonstrating a wide range of contextual influences.
Attention and perception 
14:30 - 14:45Kaffeepause
Ort: Coffee Lounge gather.town
Coffee Lounge gather.town 
14:45 - 16:15Neurophysiology of aversive conditioning and (emotional) memory
Ort: From (epi)genetics to cognition
Chair der Sitzung: Ursula Stockhorst, Universität Osnabrück
Chair der Sitzung: Andreas Keil, University of Florida
This symposium addresses the role of aversive conditioning and multisensory associative learning for perception and (emotional) memory in healthy humans, including translational implications. Keil et al. (Gainesville, USA) show how changes in sensory visuocortical tuning depend on experience. Measuring dense-array EEG and pupillometry, visuocortical responses were selectively sharpened when low-level features (e.g., orientation) had been associated with an aversive outcome whereas using higher-level features (object category) resulted in generalization (in line with top-down control). Wang et al. (Glasgow/Birmingham, UK) present empirical studies and data from computational modelling. They provide causal evidence that neural synchronization in theta- and gamma-frequencies accounts for formation of visuo-auditory associative memory in declarative-memory tasks. Plog et al. (Osnabrück) extend this research to (implicit) fear conditioning: Visual conditioned stimuli (CS) and aversive noise (unconditioned stimulus, US) were presented in 4-Hz modulation, phase-synchronized vs. out-of-phase. Phase-synchronization improved CS-US contingency-knowledge and affective stimulus-evaluation, but not steady-state-visually-evoked potentials and skin-conductance responses (SCRs). Fear-recall and poor extinction-recall characterize anxiety disorders. To identify conditions improving extinction-recall, Bierwirth et al. (Osnabrück) compared extinction learning immediately after fear-acquisition with 24-h-delayed extinction on fear- and extinction-recall. As expected, delayed-extinction resulted in better extinction-recall in SCRs. EEG (source-localized theta and gamma oscillations) and cardiac responses are currently analyzed. Sperl et al. (Marburg) examined effects of the noradrenergic alpha-2 adrenoreceptor-antagonist yohimbine, D2-receptor antagonist sulpiride and placebo on long-term fear conditioning and extinction. Yohimbine enhanced fear-recall with potentiated fear bradycardia and larger amplitudes of N170 and LPP ERP-components, elucidating a key role of noradrenaline in strengthening conditioned fear.
From (epi)genetics to cognition 
14:45 - 16:15Sex hormones and social emotional processes
Ort: Hormones and emotions
Chair der Sitzung: Bernadette von Dawans, Trier University
Chair der Sitzung: Frances Chen, University of British Columbia
Sex hormones not only regulate human development from peripheral to central systems but also influence cognitive and emotional processes, as well as sexual and social behaviors. In our symposium we will bring together studies on endogenous (e.g. variations over the menstrual cycle or differences between men and women) as well as exogenous effects (e.g., pharmacological administration studies, users of hormonal contraceptives). Elisa Rehbein (University of Tübingen, Germany) will present a placebo-controlled fMRI study on the effects of estradiol application on emotion regulation in women. Julia Strojny (Trier University, Germany) will then present results on the hormonal modulation of social behavior in oral contraceptive users and naturally-cycling women in a study using paradigms adapted from behavioural economics as well as an empathy task. In the next talk the modulation of moral judgments by oral contraceptive use, testosterone and CAG repeat polymorphisms in the androgen receptor gene will be presented by Diana Armbruster (Technical University of Chemnitz). The final two talks will focus on the health-relevant effects of sex hormones and their variations. Katja Schmalenberger from University Hospital Heidelberg (Germany) will show results on cardiac vagal activity across the menstrual cycle with implications for women’s health. Finally, Christine Anderl (Knowledge Media Research Center, Tübingen, Germany) will close the symposium with her study on the long-term associations between use of hormonal contraceptives and risk for depression.
Hormones and emotions 
14:45 - 16:15Sleep, physical, and mental wellbeing in a modern society – relevance of stress, media consumption, and artificial light
Ort: Learning, memory, and sleep
Chair der Sitzung: Christine Blume, Universität Basel
Chair der Sitzung: Christian Benedict, Uppsala University
Sleep is critical for physical health and mental well-being and sleep disturbances have been associated with a range of adverse health effects. At the same time, sleep disturbances are very common in modern societies. In Germany, about 30% of the population reported clinically relevant sleep problems in the past four weeks in a representative survey conducted between 2008 and 2011. The overall increase in numbers over the past 20-30 years suggests that several factors related to modern lifestyle may negatively affect sleep. In this symposium, we would like to revisit different aspects of such a modern lifestyle and discuss their relationship to sleep, physical health, and mental wellbeing. Specifically, Johanna Schwarz’s presentation will focus on the effect of sleep deprivation on the response to psychosocial stress. Next, Sandrine Baselgia will show how arousing effects of cliff-hangers and binge-watching of Netflix series modulate sleep. Christine Blume will present findings on how artificial light exposure before sleep affects neuroendocrinology, sleep quality, and basic human brain functions. The symposium will be concluded by Christian Benedict, who will present research on how acute sleep loss affects weight control as an important health factor. Altogether, this symposium highlights the effects of several characteristics of a modern lifestyle on sleep and investigates their relevance for mental and physical health. The symposium will be concluded with a broader discussion on how the research findings might translate into societal efforts to promote better sleep.
Learning, memory, and sleep 
14:45 - 16:15The impact of social exclusion and loneliness: neural mechanisms and interventions
Ort: Clinical challenges and the ageing brain
Chair der Sitzung: Dirk Scheele, Universität Oldenburg
Chair der Sitzung: Alexander Lischke, Medical School Hamburg
Humans have evolved as an essentially social species. Positive social relationships promote physical and mental well-being, whereas loneliness and social isolation increase the risk of premature mortality comparable to established risk factors such as obesity, physical inactivity, and substance abuse. Surprisingly, however, the impact of social exclusion and loneliness on the structure and function of the brain is still not well understood. In the current symposium, we present recent studies examining the functional and structural brain correlates of social exclusion and loneliness and how they might be modulated by behavioral interventions. Shuyan Liu explores the association between modern urbanicity, social exclusion, and mental health. Jana Lieberz reveals the neural link between loneliness and biased trustworthiness decisions in a pre-stratified sample of healthy lonely and non-lonely individuals. Federica Riva presents the relationship between loneliness and interoception at both behavioral and brain level. Alexander Lischke shows that social network size affects the structural integrity of the amygdala. Zoé Bürger investigates the effects of social exclusion and cognitive stress on the neural functional connectivity in women and men.
Clinical challenges and the ageing brain 
14:45 - 16:15Neuronale Korrelate kindlicher Kognitionen
Ort: Perspectives in neuroscience
Chair der Sitzung: Stefanie Peykarjou, Universität Heidelberg
In der frühen und mittleren Kindheit wird die Basis für spätere kognitive Fähigkeiten gebildet. Ein entscheidender Prozess besteht dabei darin, auditorische und visuelle Information zu verarbeiten und zu integrieren. In diesem Symposium werden 5 Beiträge präsentiert, die neuronale Grundlagen dieser Lernprozesse mittels Ereigniskorrelierter Potentiale (EKPs) und Frequenzmessungen erfassen. Die Beiträge befassen sich mit Reaktionen auf auditorische, visuelle und crossmodale Oddballs sowie mit Objekt-Wort-Verknüpfungen und intermodalem Handlungsverständnis bei Säuglingen und Kindern. Der erste Beitrag untersucht unter Verwendung des Oddball-Paradigmas die auditorische Diskriminationsfähigkeit bei 7 – 12 Monate alten Säuglingen. Selten präsentierte Klaviertöne lösten eine P3a-ähnliche Komponente aus, welche sich mit dem Alter verstärkte (Wienke et al.). Der zweite Beitrag misst kategoriales Lernen unvertrauter Stimuli bei 7 Monate alten Säuglingen. Gewöhnungseffekte während einer EKP-Familiarisierung waren mit späterer Kategorisierungsleistung in einem Fast Periodic Visual Stimulation Paradigma verbunden und reflektieren eine high-level visual processing (Peykarjou et al.). Der dritte Beitrag demonstriert, dass 18 Monate alte Kleinkinder verbale Cues mit visueller Handlungsinformation integrieren (Patzwald et al.). An somatosensorischen Messpunkten war Mu reduziert für kongruente verglichen mit inkongruenter verbaler und visueller Information. Im vierten Beitrag werden Gedächtnisprozesse während des Wortlernens bei 4-jährigen untersucht (Brehm et al.). Hierbei wurde die Stärke des Theta-Rhythmus kurz vor Benennung eines neuartigen Objektes mit dem späteren Lernerfolg assoziiert. Im fünften Beitrag wurden EKPs bei 5- bis 6-jährigen Kindern für häufig auftretende audiovisuelle Reizkombinationen mit selten auftretenden Rekombinationen dieser Reize verglichen (Schlesinger-Zweckerl et al.). EKP-Effekte für seltene crossmodale Reizkombinationen wurden unabhängig von der Aufgabenrelevanz der statistischen Regelmäßigkeiten gefunden.
Perspectives in neuroscience 
14:45 - 16:15Up- and down-tuning in attention: Neuro-cognitive mechanisms of target selection and distractor suppression
Ort: Attention and perception
Chair der Sitzung: Malte Wöstmann, Universität zu Lübeck
Chair der Sitzung: Daniel Schneider, Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors Dortmund (IfADo)
In theory, selective attention is the net result of target selection and distractor suppression. The way in which the human neuro-cognitive system implements both mechanisms has remained contested. Recent insights from cognitive neuropsychology support the view of attention as a dynamic set of filters rather than a static spotlight. In a series of five talks, this symposium will bring together researchers approaching the mechanics and the neural implementation of the attention filter from different angles, using behavioral psychophysics and electroencephalography (EEG). Malte Wöstmann (University of Lübeck) will provide evidence from EEG that distractor suppression is independent of target selection and operates in a rhythmic manner. Anna-Katharina Bauer (University of Oxford) will demonstrate that the rhythmic sampling of visual target stimuli is subject to cross-modal entrainment. Bojana Mirkovic (University of Oldenburg) will focus on one of the most important sensory stimuli in our environments – human speech – to show that degraded acoustics and hearing-loss affect the neural segregation of target and distractor speech. Daniel Schneider (IfADo Dortmund) will present evidence for attentional filtering on the level of visual working memory, where temporarily stored target items are enhanced while distractors are suppressed. Finally, Dirk van Moorselaar (Vrije University, Amsterdam) will show that neural effects of learned expectations critically depend on task relevance (targets vs. distractors) and the dimension of predictions (spatial, feature). In sum, this symposium will establish a comprehensive account of target selection and distractor suppression on different levels of neural processing by a set of filters to implement selective attention.
Attention and perception 
16:15 - 16:30Kaffeepause
Ort: Coffee Lounge gather.town
Coffee Lounge gather.town 
16:30 - 16:45Brain Products Young Scientist Award / IGOR-Preis für offene und reproduzierbare Forschung
Ort: Plenum
Chair der Sitzung: Martin Herrmann, Universitätsklinikum Würzburg
Chair der Sitzung: Gordon Feld, Zentralinstitut für Seelische Gesundheit - Universität Heidelberg
Plenum 
16:45 - 17:45Hauptvortrag - Nikolai Axmacher
Ort: Plenum
Chair der Sitzung: Steffen Gais, Universität Tübingen
What we remember from an episode: Memory as reactivation, transformation, and selection
Experiences are stored in the brain via modifications of synaptic connections, changing the neural representations of specific events. Network-level signatures of these representations – “engram patterns” – can be extracted from patterns of EEG oscillations and fMRI BOLD activity. In the first part of my talk, I will show how reoccurrence of engram patterns supports diverse memory functions from short-term memory maintenance to long-term memory retrieval and consolidation: memory as reactivation. However, it is commonly assumed that memory is not a veridical reproduction of past experiences but involves substantial transformations. In the second part, I will describe a taxonomy of memory transformation processes and discuss some conceptual problems of a generative view on memory: memory as transformation. I will then describe a novel view which assumes that engram patterns consist of multiple representational formats which can be selectively activated during memory processes and quantitatively described via deep neural networks. Some initial evidence for this view of memory as selection is presented, together with ideas for future research.
Plenum 
17:45 - 18:00Schlussworte
Ort: Plenum
Chair der Sitzung: Steffen Gais, Universität Tübingen
Chair der Sitzung: Gesa Hartwigsen, Max-Planck-Institut für Kognitions- und Neurowissenschaften, Leipzig
Plenum