Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this Conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

Please note that all times are shown in the time zone of the conference. The current conference time is: 18th May 2022, 04:36:22am BST

 
 
Session Overview
Date: Saturday, 10/July/2021
9:00am - 4:00pmSource apportionment of mine pollution in watersheds: An introduction to the tracer dilution and synoptic sampling approach
Session Chair: Patrick Byrne
Overview Need for the workshop. Pollution from abandoned and active mines is recognised as a major cause of failure to achieve water quality objectives around the world. As such, identification and remediation of mine pollution sources is one of the major challenges facing environmental managers. Developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, the tracer dilution and synoptic sampling approach has been used extensively in the USA to inform remediation under the Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative. The approach provides streamflow estimates across a watershed by measuring the dilution of a conservative tracer injected into the stream. Combined with synchronous (or synoptic) water quality measurements, the approach provides spatially detailed assessments of pollutant loads and sources for remediation decision-making. Target audience. The target audience for this workshop includes practitioners and researchers who are interested in understanding the sources and impacts of mine pollution in watersheds. Specifically, the workshop will appeal to those interested in locating sources of mine pollution and quantifying the relative importance of different sources at the watershed-scale. Professionals who might be interested in this workshop include hydrologists, hydrogeologists, water quality scientists, ecologists, environmental engineers, and mine site remediation and rehabilitation scientists. Outline. The workshop will follow the format of previous successful knowledge exchange workshops delivered to UK practitioners and scientists as part of a UK research council (NERC) funded project. The programme will run from (approximately) 0900 to 1600 and include five sessions: an introduction (0900-0930), three technical sessions (0930-1530), and a final discussion (1530-1600). Each of the three technical sessions will include a 30 minute presentation followed by a 60 minute practical activity. The sessions topics are: ‘Preparing for a tracer dilution experiment’, Executing a tracer dilution experiment’ and ‘Analysis and communication of tracer dilution data’. Outcomes and benefits. The overall aim of the workshop is to build the capacity of environmental managers, scientists and engineers to monitor and remediate mine pollution in watersheds. At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: (i) design a tracer dilution and synoptic sampling experiment; (ii) understand how to conduct a tracer dilution experiment; (iii) perform a mine pollution source apportionment analysis; and (iv) evaluate potential water quality improvements from hypothetical remediation scenarios. This workshop will benefit practitioners and researchers interested in understanding and mitigating the impacts of mine pollution in the environment. Environmental managers and remediation scientists in particular will benefit from understanding how to locate and discern the relative importance of different mine pollution sources across a watershed, and to evaluate the benefits of remedial alternatives. Materials. The technical sessions outlined above will be structured around a case study of the Nant Cwmnewyddion stream in central Wales. The publication can be accessed here. For each of the three technical sessions, workshop participants will receive an excel spreadsheet containing case study data and a handout with instructions on how to perform different analyses. Participants will receive all of the presentation slides in pdf format.
 
9:00am - 4:00pm"PITLAKQ" Modelling Pit Lakes: Modelling Hydrodynamics and Water Quality of Pit Lakes with PITLAKQ
Session Chair: Mike Müller
Overview Modelling pit lakes is a complex task. The open-source software PITLAKQ (http://www.pitlakq.com) allows one to model hydrodynamic processes in pit lakes including temperature stratification. Furthermore, transport of constituents and a variety of chemical and biological reactions can be modelled. PITLAKQ combines the abilities of CE-QUAL-W2 (http://www.cee.pdx.edu/w2/) and PHREEQC (http://wwwbrr.cr.usgs.gov/projects/GWC_coupled). Participants need to be familiar with the topic of pit lakes and their water quality. Basic hydro-geo-chemical knowledge is assumed. Preferably, participants should have modelling experience with CE-QUAL-W2, PHREEQC or comparable models. They also need to have basic knowledge of important pit lake processes. Solid PC handling abilities are necessary. Participants will get login data to an online teaching system, consisting of a video conferencing system and a modelling environment (JupyterHub). This system has been used by Python Academy for nearly a year (see attachment for details). After the course, participants can install PITLAKQ on their own computers and used the same tools they learn in the course. PITLAKQ provides new features such as distributed groundwater exchange, treatment of the lake water with chemicals, and accounting for the impact of bank erosion on lake water quality. This workshop introduces PITLAKQ with a hands-on tutorial of setting up and running models. It covers: Getting familiar with the teaching system Python basics for running models Setting up and running a hydrodynamic model Interpreting and presenting hydrodynamic results Setting up and running a water quality model Interpreting and presenting water quality results Varying the water quality processes PITLAKQ solves complex problems and offers many more features than can be covered in the workshop. The presenter will be glad to answer questions that go beyond the content described above. Each participant will receive a comprehensive course handout (PDF) and the PITLAKQ software. After the course, participants will be able to set up and run PITLAKQ models.
 
9:00pm - 10:30pmIMWA EC Meeting
Session Chair: Christian Wolkersdorfer
 
Date: Sunday, 11/July/2021
9:00am - 3:30pmBiotechnologies for the treatment of mining and metallurgical wastewater on the context of metal recovery
Session Chair: Denys Villa Gomez
This course will provide a complete insight on the currently bio-based alternatives for mine wastewater treatment, including biological sulphate/sulphur reduction, biosorption, or enzymatic reductive precipitation among others. The application of these technologies is a step forward from using chemicals, eliminating the costs associated with the acquisition of reagents, and in the case of biological sulphate reduction, it uses a pollutant usually present in metal-containing wastewaters (i.e. sulfate) and it allows the production of sulfide on-site, thus avoiding transportation of hazardous chemicals. Currently, an increasing number of mining companies are evaluating these technologies, either in their processes or in wastewater treatment applications. The application of these microorganisms offers the potential for enhanced metal recovery and a sustainable strategy for handling water and solid wastes. The effect on the water sector through this course is a change of thinking from considering treatment of mine-impacted water as a cost, to consider it as a resource that can provide revenue. This, by overcoming the barriers on lacking know-how of the process and the further adaptation of these technologies case by case to receive a more widespread implementation of these technologies. The knowledge and application of these microbial-based technologies are an important way to green up the industry, reducing environmental risks and improving the efficiency and the economy of mine water treatment through metal recovery. At the completion of this course you should be able to: Describe the fundamental principles and commonly applied biotechnologies to recover metals from various wastewater streams, including the advantages, disadvantages and typical application area of each technology; Set a design basis for the different metal recovery technologies, conduct preliminary reactor sizing and calculate performance predictions; Identify opportunities, challenges and research needs for metal recovery from other streams in terms of environmental and economic benefits.
 
9:00am - 3:30pmPractical Guide to Open Pit and Underground Mine Water Management
Session Chair: Simon James Sholl
Overview This one day course aims to provide those currently working in the development or operation of mining projects with an introduction to the main elements of mine water management at open pit and underground operations. Following on from an initial introduction of how to define and quantify mine water management requirements, the course will focus on practical examples of water management techniques applied at mine sites located in a variety of hydro(geo)logical settings across the globe. The course will cover all aspects of water management from mine dewatering and pore-pressure control, surface water conveyance, water quality prediction, control and treatment and site-wide water balance optimization. Module 1: Open pit mine water management (1.5 hrs) Starting with an overview of how water affects mining, including operational and cost implications, this module will provide an introduction to the general principles of mine water control, before providing practical examples of dewatering methods (including passive water control), surface water control and reviewing dewatering versus depressurisation. Methods for predicting dewatering rates will be reviewed, including the use and applicability of numerical models, before the design and analysis of monitoring data as a means of measuring the operational effectiveness of implemented dewatering strategies is assessed. Module 2: Underground mine water management(1.5 hrs) This module will focus on water management strategies for underground operations, including the specific requirements needed where underground operations develop either beneath exiting open pit operations, or where block caving is the mining method. The module will be based on practical examples of operations which have implemented pumping and/or grouting/freezing approaches to groundwater control underground. Focus will be placed on the criticality of the design execution, including development of a robust feedback loop as part of operations, to ensure that design-implementation-verification are constantly reviewed to maintain safe underground operations. Module 3: Mine water chemistry (1.5 hrs) This module will focus on the increasingly challenging issue of management of mine contact water. The module will encompass approaches to the prediction of contact water quality, the design of mine water management systems to optimize water quality and the key technologies applicable to the mining sector for the treatment of mine water. The module will be structured to consider all stages of the mine life cycle from pre-construction design to closure. Practical examples will be provided from a spectrum of climatic and geological settings, with successes and/or causes of failure highlighted as appropriate. Module 4: Mine water management as part of the site wide water balance (1.5 hrs) The final module in this course demonstrates how a site-wide water and chemical mass balance model allows the pit and/or underground and geochemistry aspects of mine management to be integrated. With the inclusion of additional mine-site water management requirements, such as process circuits, TSFs and waste rock dumps, a water balance provides an important tool for both short-term decision making and life of mine planning. Probabilistic simulations using GoldSim allow alternative water management strategies to be simulated and their relative risks included in trade off studies.
 
9:00am - 4:00pm"PITLAKQ" Modelling Pit Lakes: Modelling Hydrodynamics and Water Quality of Pit Lakes with PITLAKQ
Session Chair: Mike Müller
This course will provide a complete insight on the currently bio-based alternatives for mine wastewater treatment, including biological sulphate/sulphur reduction, biosorption, or enzymatic reductive precipitation among others. The application of these technologies is a step forward from using chemicals, eliminating the costs associated with the acquisition of reagents, and in the case of biological sulphate reduction, it uses a pollutant usually present in metal-containing wastewaters (i.e. sulfate) and it allows the production of sulfide on-site, thus avoiding transportation of hazardous chemicals. Currently, an increasing number of mining companies are evaluating these technologies, either in their processes or in wastewater treatment applications. The application of these microorganisms offers the potential for enhanced metal recovery and a sustainable strategy for handling water and solid wastes. The effect on the water sector through this course is a change of thinking from considering treatment of mine-impacted water as a cost, to consider it as a resource that can provide revenue. This, by overcoming the barriers on lacking know-how of the process and the further adaptation of these technologies case by case to receive a more widespread implementation of these technologies. The knowledge and application of these microbial-based technologies are an important way to green up the industry, reducing environmental risks and improving the efficiency and the economy of mine water treatment through metal recovery. At the completion of this course you should be able to: Describe the fundamental principles and commonly applied biotechnologies to recover metals from various wastewater streams, including the advantages, disadvantages and typical application area of each technology; Set a design basis for the different metal recovery technologies, conduct preliminary reactor sizing and calculate performance predictions; Identify opportunities, challenges and research needs for metal recovery from other streams in terms of environmental and economic benefits.
 
Date: Monday, 12/July/2021
8:30am - 9:10amOpening Ceremony
Location: Main Room
Main Room 
9:10am - 10:00amMorning Session Monday
Location: Main Room
Session Chair: Christian Wolkersdorfer
Main Room 
10:00am - 10:10amHealth Break
 
10:10am - 12:15pmMine Drainage Chemistry
Location: Meeting Room 1
Session Chair: Christopher James Satterley
Meeting Room 1 
10:10am - 12:15pmMine Water Treatment
Location: Meeting Room 2
Session Chair: Devin Sapsford
Meeting Room 2 
10:10am - 12:15pmWaste Rock
Location: Meeting Room 3
Session Chair: Trystan James
Meeting Room 3 
12:15pm - 1:00pmLunch
 
1:00pm - 3:30pmMine Drainage Chemistry
Location: Meeting Room 1
Session Chair: Peter Clive Stanley
Meeting Room 1 
1:00pm - 3:30pmMine Water Treatment & Benefits Enhancement
Location: Meeting Room 2
Session Chair: Rhys John Savage
Meeting Room 2 
1:00pm - 3:30pmWaste Rock
Location: Meeting Room 3
Session Chair: Andrew Barnes
Meeting Room 3 
5:00pm - 6:30pmGeneral IMWA Assembly
Session Chair: Christian Wolkersdorfer
IMWA Members have received login details for this Zoom meeting previously.
 
Date: Tuesday, 13/July/2021
8:45am - 9:40amMorning Session Tuesday
Location: Main Room
Session Chair: Robert Vaughan
Main Room 
9:40am - 9:50amHealth Break
 
9:50am - 12:20pmCultural & Benefits Enhancement
Location: Meeting Room 1
Session Chair: Louise Siddorn
Meeting Room 1 
9:50am - 12:20pmCleaning Up
Location: Meeting Room 2
Session Chair: Robert Vaughan
Meeting Room 2 
9:50am - 12:20pmPassive Treatment
Location: Meeting Room 3
Session Chair: William Timothy Perkins
Meeting Room 3 
12:20pm - 1:00pmLunch
 
1:00pm - 3:05pmLegacy Mine Impacts
Location: Meeting Room 1
Session Chair: Diana Brookshaw
Meeting Room 1 
1:00pm - 3:05pmMine Water Treatment
Location: Meeting Room 2
Session Chair: Sudhagar Pitchaimuthu
Meeting Room 2 
1:00pm - 3:05pmMine Hydrogeology
Location: Meeting Room 3
Session Chair: Edward Austin
Meeting Room 3 
3:20pm - 5:00pmPoster
Location: Exhibition
Exhibition 
5:00pm - 7:00pmSocial Online Gathering
Join Zoom Meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82179453639?pwd=aWtraUNEcGtYZnl2Q2pEMnRZei80dz09 | Meeting ID: 821 7945 3639 | Passcode: 946445
 
Date: Wednesday, 14/July/2021
8:45am - 9:40amMorning Session Wednesday
Location: Main Room
Session Chair: Carl Banton
Main Room 
9:40am - 9:50amHealth Break
 
9:50am - 11:55amEcology
Location: Meeting Room 1
Session Chair: Paul John Edwards
Meeting Room 1 
9:50am - 11:55amPassive Treatment & Mine Closure
Location: Meeting Room 2
Session Chair: Carl Banton
Meeting Room 2 
9:50am - 11:55amMine Hydrogeology
Location: Meeting Room 3
Session Chair: Andrew Clifford Johnstone
Meeting Room 3 
11:55am - 12:40pmLunch
 
12:40pm - 2:45pmMine Drainage Chemistry & Passive Treatment
Location: Meeting Room 1
Session Chair: Arabella Mary Louise Moorhouse-Parry
Meeting Room 1 
12:40pm - 2:45pmMine Water Treatment
Location: Meeting Room 2
Session Chair: Tobias Stefan Roetting
Meeting Room 2 
12:40pm - 2:45pmLegacy Mine Impacts
Location: Meeting Room 3
Session Chair: Julia Dent
Meeting Room 3 
3:00pm - 5:00pmVirtual Tours
 
Date: Thursday, 15/July/2021
8:45am - 9:40amMorning Session Thursday
Location: Main Room
Session Chair: John George Annandale
Main Room 
9:40am - 9:50amHealth Break
 
9:50am - 11:55amMine Drainage Chemistry & Passive Treatment
Location: Meeting Room 1
Session Chair: Ian Jones
Meeting Room 1 
9:50am - 11:55amMine Hydrogeology
Location: Meeting Room 2
Session Chair: Catherine Hughes
Meeting Room 2 
9:50am - 11:55amMining Operations
Location: Meeting Room 3
Session Chair: John George Annandale
Meeting Room 3 
11:55am - 12:40pmLunch
 
12:40pm - 2:20pmLegacy Mine Impacts
Location: Meeting Room 1
Session Chair: Tom Williams
Meeting Room 1 
12:40pm - 2:20pmMine Closure
Location: Meeting Room 2
Session Chair: Aaron Martin Lawrence Brown
Meeting Room 2 
12:40pm - 2:20pmDecarbonisation
Location: Meeting Room 3
Session Chair: Gareth Farr
Meeting Room 3 
2:20pm - 3:00pmClosing Ceremony