Conference Program

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

To join a session click on the session title in the program and click on the blue Zoom button near the top of the session page. Zoom buttons will appear 15 min before a session starts. You must login to access the Zoom sessions and may have to reload the page.

 
 

Session Overview - All times EDT

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Location: Room 4
Date: Monday, 31/May/2021
12:30pm - 2:00pm1.2.4: The Challenges of Finding a Tenure-Track Job - Workshop
Location: Room 4
Session Chair: Liam Swiss
Technical chair: Adrian Murray

Finding a tenure track job is difficult even in the best of times. In today’s job market, and in the midst of a global pandemic, it may appear even more daunting. But don’t panic! CASID 2021 will feature a roundtable discussion and workshop with both seasoned professors who have sat on dozens of hiring committees and junior scholars who have recently found positions in this highly competitive job market. This workshop will be conducted mainly in English.

Panelists include: Nathan Andrews, University of Northern British Columbia; Philippe Frowd, University of Ottawa; Prachi Srivastava, Western University; Rebecca Tiessen, University of Ottawa; Daniel Tubb, University of New Brunswick.

Room 4 
2:30pm - 4:00pm1.3.4: Demystifying Decolonization: Baby Steps & Reflexive Praxis - Workshop
Location: Room 4
Technical chair: Alisa Greenwood Nguyen

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(conference registration required)

Room 4 
 

Chair: Jess Notwell

University of Guelph, Canada

Does “decolonization” feel intimidating or just too big? Are you committed to decolonization but afraid to “get it wrong”? Do you struggle with how to make decolonizing International ‘Development’ Studies pedagogy and curriculum concrete and achievable? In this workshop, we will use the Medicine Wheel to explore practical reflection questions and develop decolonization action plans. Beginning with identifying the colonial narratives that make decolonization seem impossible, and culminating with enumerating practical steps each of us can take to decolonize our teaching and research, this workshop will demystify decolonization. Like all transformative processes, decolonizing ‘development’ is achieved one small step at a time. Each participant will leave the workshop with their own definition of decolonization and a personal decolonization action plan that identifies the steps they will take over the next 12 months.

 

Date: Tuesday, 01/June/2021
12:30pm - 2:00pm2.2.4: Writing in research companions as a decolonizing writing practice - Workshop
Location: Room 4
Technical chair: Adrian Murray

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(conference registration required)

Room 4 
 

Chair: Christine Gibb

University of Ottawa, Canada

Once sidelined to footnotes and acknowledgements, research companions have increasingly been rendered visible and their contributions considered in scholarly development writing. Publications typically focus on research assistants (Gold et al. 2014; Turner 2010; Middleton and Cons 2014), accompanying family members (Taylor 2014; Lunn and Moscuzza 2014; Flinn, Marshall, and Armstrong 1998; De Silva and Gandhi 2019), especially children (Starrs et al. 2001; Korpela, Hirvi, and Tawah 2016; Frohlick 2002; Cupples and Kindon 2003; Cornet and Blumenfield 2016; Johnston 2015; Farrelly, Stewart-Withers, and Dombroski 2014; Tripp 2002), with some mention of supervisors, students, colleagues, pets, editors, and other collaborators (Gupta 2014; Heller et al. 2011; Swanson 2008). Writing in research companions remains risky, particularly for aspiring scholars who want to meaningfully recognize the contributions of their collaborators but feel like they must first establish their professional identity and credibility as an independent researcher.

The goals of their workshop are to share and to devise writing practices that meaningfully recognize the contributions of our research companions. The workshop will include a facilitated discussion and small group exercises.

 
2:30pm - 4:00pm2.3.4: Strengthening scholar-activist networks in development studies - Workshop
Location: Room 4
Technical chair: Adrian Murray

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(conference registration required)

Room 4 
 

Chairs: Georgina Alonso1, Adrian Murray2

1University of Ottawa; 2University of Johannesburg

In this workshop, we will hold an open, roundtable discussion on the scholar-activist role in development studies. We are interested in bringing together self-defined scholar-activists to discuss pushing a progressive internationalist agenda through our research, teaching and/or practice. In particular, we focus on anti-capitalist, anti-racist, and anti-oppressive efforts. We also will discuss highlighting progressive theory and policy in the face of mainstream development and encouraging progressive internationalism.

Questions for discussion could include: What is the role of the academy in advancing global justice and how can this be done? What are the institutional barriers that scholar-activists encounter within and beyond the academy? How can we use the classroom as an organizing space? How can activism inspire critical hope among students who feel deflated by the world’s overwhelming problems and the inadequate responses proposed by mainstream development? How can we ensure that our radical writing and discussions go beyond theory to praxis? How can we foster better collaboration and collective action amongst ourselves and with social movements?

 

Date: Wednesday, 02/June/2021
12:30pm - 2:00pm3.2.4: Building a Decolonizing "Development" Community of Praxis - Workshop
Location: Room 4
Technical chair: Jess Notwell

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(conference registration required)

Room 4 
 

Chair: Jess Notwell1, Yuriko Cowper-Smith2, Matt McBurney3

1University of Guelph, Canada; 2University of Guelph, Canada; 3University of Guelph, Canada

Decolonizing “development” studies and practice would require a radical departure from capitalist heteropatriarchal White Supremacist colonial modernity (Yazzie, 2019; Walsh & Mignolo, 2019; Simpson, 2017; Lugones, 2007; Quijano, 2006). Is it even possible? Respecting ways of knowing and being such as relational life (Yazzie, 2019), radical resistance (Simpson, 2017), and decoloniality (Walsh & Mignolo, 2019), this workshop contributes a strengths-based, collective exploration of the possibility through feminist, decolonizing and community-engaged scholarship and practice. First, through case studies from workshop facilitators’ own experiences, participants will deepen their understanding of what it means to implement practices, methodologies and pedagogies that: (1) prioritize feminist, decolonizing and community-engaged ways of work; (2) strengthen and sustain collaboration among academics, activists and practitioners; and (3) could contribute to the decolonization of “development”. Second, participants will share examples from their own practice, activism, research and/or teaching and use their strengths (knowledge, experience, networks) to identify strategies to shift each person’s praxis and create space for this shift within their organizations/institutions. Third, participants will draft core values and a relationships map as the foundation for initiating a Decolonizing “Development” Community of Praxis (COPx). Each participant will leave the workshop with two key take-aways: (1) personal action steps to transform their practice/activism/scholarship and organizational/institutional spaces, and (2) Community of Praxis collective action steps to support one another in this work. The intended audience of this Action for Change workshop are academics, practitioners and community members who work on, or want to work on, decolonizing development. We are requesting a double-slot in order to have 90 minutes for sharing and co-learning in the first part of the workshop as well as 90 minutes for developing the Decolonizing “Development” COPx which we hope to turn into a research cluster within CASID.

 
2:30pm - 4:00pm3.3.4: Presentation of the CASID Membership Survey
Location: Room 4
Session Chair: Kate Grantham
Session Chair: Jess Notwell

Join representatives from the CASID Executive Committee to view and discuss the results of the membership survey.

Room 4 

Date: Thursday, 03/June/2021
12:30pm - 2:00pm4.2.4: Beyond the Academy: Career opportunities in international development - Workshop
Location: Room 4
Session Chair: Marie Gagné
Technical chair: Furqan Asif

Registration is now closed.

Considering a career in development outside the academy? CASID 2021 will host a roundtable discussion and workshop with a group of development graduates and professionals working in a diverse array of roles in within and beyond the field. The panelists will share their own experiences of making the decision to pursue alternative career paths, offering advice to students and recent graduates about how to chart a path forward beyond the academy. This will be followed by more in depth, workshop style discussions around key themes and sectors in plenary and breakout groups to more deeply explore these paths and processes.

Panelists include: Julie Crowley, IDRC; Kate Grantham, FemDev; Carly Hayes GAC; Paola Ortiz, SSHRC; Deborah Simpson, OXFAM Canada.

Room 4 
2:30pm - 4:00pm4.3.4: Prioritizing Indigenous Worldviews within performance management and evaluation - Workshop
Location: Room 4
Technical chair: Adrian Murray
Room 4 
 

Chair: Marissa Hill

Indigenous Innovation Initiative at Grand Challenges Canada

The Indigenous Innovation Initiative is an innovation platform, hosted at Grand Challenges Canada, that supports the development of innovation by and for First Nation, Inuit and Metis Peoples in Canada. To do this, we increase access to capital and culturally relevant support for innovators, by addressing the following key barriers to the economic participation of Indigenous Peoples in Canada through a decolonized social impact investing approach:

- Access to capital: Addressing the resource gaps and investment needs of innovators

- Building capacity: Supporting innovators with the Knowledges, skills and tools they need to succeed

- Cultivating networks: Connecting innovators to a meaningful and supportive ecosystem that increases their social capital

- Driving interest: Sharing individual and program stories of impact, success and learnings to inspire and empower the next generation of Indigenous innovation

In early 2020, we collaborated with First Nation, Inuit and Metis women, men, Two Spirit, queer and gender diverse peoples across Canada and completed a comprehensive literature review to inform development of a decolonized inquiry and learning framework that is specific to innovation within an Indigenous context.

Addressing the theme of "action for change," this workshop will support practitioners in understanding the core Values, Principles and Wise Practices that are the foundation of this inquiry and learning approach, and how to decolonize their own approaches and advance the decolonization of knowledge creation and utilization as it relates to supporting Indigenous innovation. This also addresses some of the long-standing tensions between Indigenous Worldviews and Western results-based management approaches.

 

Date: Friday, 04/June/2021
10:00am - 11:30am5.1.4: Publishing your article: a guide for young scholars - Workshop
Location: Room 4
Technical chair: Furqan Asif
Room 4 
 

A. Haroon Akram-Lodhi1, Stephen Brown2

1Trent University, Canada; 2University of Ottawa

Publishing your research can be a daunting experience for doctoral students and graduates. This workshop will work its way through the process of publication in scholarly journals, with particular reference to the Canadian Journal of Development Studies. It will include advice on submitting your article, receiving a response, responding to that response, tracking copy-editing, and publicizing your published article.

 
12:30pm - 2:00pm5.2.4: Decolonizing the International Development Studies syllabus - Workshop
Location: Room 4
Technical chair: Adrian Murray

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(conference registration required)

Room 4 
 

Chairs: Georgina Alonso1, Adrian Murray2

1University of Ottawa; 2University of Johannesburg

While the concept of development is contested and the goals and methods of development practice are debated, ostensibly the uniting principle of development is that it is about ‘making the world a better place.’ This workshop is based on the premise that development studies can do a much better job of empowering students with the tools to take informed and urgent action in this pursuit, particularly by focusing on decolonization and anti-racism.. We begin with a discussion of what ‘decolonizing’ international development education could look like, followed by breakout room brainstorming sessions centred on specific aspects of curriculum building.

The make-up of development studies classrooms is changing. While it is fundamentally important to push back against the white saviourism that many eager students bring to development studies, we must also recognize the diversity of backgrounds, experiences, and needs of racialized students, ensuring that learning content speaks to everyone. In an effort to address the diverse needs of students and combat the anxiety, cynicism, and pessimism that is increasingly common amongst development studies students--especially in the context of COVID-19, the climate crisis, the dismal job market and growing inequality--we propose a rethink of the core development studies literature. This would involve broadening the diversity of thinkers to include a wider variety of ontological perspectives, epistemological positions and identities. Indigenous literatures and worldviews in particular can help students envision alternatives to oppressive systems which can seem impossible to overcome.

 
2:30pm - 4:00pm5.3.4: Digitizing Basic Services: Mentoring the social business franchise - Workshop
Location: Room 4
Technical chair: Furqan Asif

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(conference registration required)

Room 4 
 

Chairs: Faisal Haq Shaheen1, Fayyaz Baqir2

1Ryerson University, Canada; 2University of Ottawa, Canada

Pakistan continues to underperform on a number of social and economic indicators as compared to other countries at the same level of income. A significant part of this is due to the lack of service delivery. Most urban services are restricted to the formal sector, while the informal sector struggles with a lack of access and several barriers.

The formal sector has erected several barriers in part due to a lack of understanding of service and predatory ideology, policies, and practices of elites. Community level barriers revolve around a lack of integration between formal and informal knowledge, little documentation, limited analysis or guidance, politicization of solutions and class dynamics.

Utilizing the entry points: Water, Sanitation, and Solid Waste Management; the TKE network seeks to engage and train young community members to develop social business models which will strengthen and support lower tier service delivery in local government.

Applicants will qualify for getting a Franchise for ‘Adopt Your Town’ (AYT) if they compile a score card for basic services in at least one Union Council (UC)-lowest tier of local government- and mark the service scores on a base map. Once mapping and scoring of services for all of the UCs, TKE’s local partners in Pakistan will work with the selected candidate to sign a Service Management contract with the town government under which AYT will oversee and report on service quality to the town government, issue bills and collect payments at the household level as a subcontractor. In turn, AYT will receive payments for the services rendered to the government. AYT Management in Pakistan will receive a onetime contract fee and periodic payment of a management services fee from the AYT Franchisee.

This workshop will map out and critique the civic entrepreneurship model with peers and seek to improve upon design.