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Session Overview
Session
Paper Session 19: Information Behavior Amidst COVID-19
Time:
Tuesday, 01/Nov/2022:
11:30am - 1:00pm

Session Chair: Melissa Ocepek, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Location: King's Garden 1, Ballroom Level, Wyndham


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Presentations
11:30am - 12:00pm
ID: 141 / PS19: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agreed to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am22/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Behavior (information behavior; information-seeking behavior; information needs and use; information practices; usability; user experience; human-computer interaction; human-technology interaction; human-AI interaction)
Keywords: COVID-19; information behavior; information seeking; information encountering; information avoidance

“I Try to Find a Balance”: Investigating Strategies for Self-Regulating COVID News Consumption

Corina Zappia, Stephann Makri

City, University of London, United Kingdom

Excessive news consumption during global crises (e.g., through regularly monitoring fast-moving developments), can result in information fatigue and anxiety. Indeed, research has highlighted dangerous risks to mental wellbeing from ‘over-consumption’ of Covid-related news. While prior research has examined how people find Covid-related information and sometimes avoid it to prevent overwhelm, no existing studies have investigated how people leverage information seeking, encountering and avoidance (often in concert) to self-regulate their Covid news consumption. We conducted a two-week diary study and follow-up interviews with 16 people. An inductive Thematic Analysis identified several strategies for self-regulating Covid news consumption: short-term avoidance of all Covid news, selective avoidance (e.g., of news on particular Covid topics), selective consumption of Covid news from particular sources, news perceived to be within one’s control, or news likely to be of personal benefit and conscious consumption of Covid news by limiting time spent consuming it, relying on passively encountering (rather than actively seeking) it and consuming it less frequently by returning to pre-pandemic news-browsing routines. An understanding of Covid news self-regulation strategies can help digital platforms that provide crisis-related news better support people in regulating their information consumption more effectively which, in turn, can help safeguard their mental wellbeing.



12:00pm - 12:30pm
ID: 139 / PS19: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agreed to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am22/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Behavior (information behavior; information-seeking behavior; information needs and use; information practices; usability; user experience; human-computer interaction; human-technology interaction; human-AI interaction)
Keywords: Adolescence, Well-being, Conversational agent, Technology interventions

Talk it Out: Teen Reactions to a Supportive Conversational Agent

Irene Lopatovska, Olivia Turpin, Ji Hee Yoon, Diedre Brown, Laura Vroom

Pratt Institute, USA

COVID-19 measures of isolation exasperated the negative feeling, particularly in younger and older populations. We tested a voice conversational agent designed to support teens by offering interactions based on five types of behavioral interventions (compassion, self-compassion, positive psychology, mindfulness, and humor), and examined teen reactions to these interventions. Thirty-nine adolescents were asked to assess one randomized interaction a day for fifteen days. All five intervention types received positive ratings, with self-compassion scoring the highest and compassion scoring the lowest by the participants. Participants shared more positive than negative feedback about the interaction scenarios, the perceived agent’s personality and conversational flow. Positive feedback emphasized enjoyment and benefits of the interaction, empathetic traits in the agent’s responses, a sense of validation, and moments for self-reflection fostered by the interactions. Participants enjoyed the conversation flow that felt similar to a natural conversation. Negative comments generally revolved around perception of the impersonal agent, inappropriate pace of conversation (too slow/fast) or number of conversational turns, and dislike of some interaction topics. Recommendations based on this exploratory work are included.



12:30pm - 12:45pm
ID: 153 / PS19: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agreed to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am22/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Behavior (information behavior; information-seeking behavior; information needs and use; information practices; usability; user experience; human-computer interaction; human-technology interaction; human-AI interaction)
Keywords: information resilience; information overload; information environment; mobile populations; communal support

“How do You Shelter in Place on the Road?”: Building Information Resilience Through Communal Support for Van Dwellers in the Onset of COVID-19

Kaitlin Montague

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, USA

During the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic, new health information was being disseminated at unprecedented rates which included ever-changing mandates and regulations, resulting in information overload for many. Shelter in place orders are the pandemic-related information that will be discussed. As these dynamic orders were announced and enforced, mobile populations—people who live in their vans or “van dwellers”—abandoned life on the road and rushed to loved ones to abide by social distancing directives. Others had nowhere to turn. This pilot study of van dweller’s information practices focuses on the early weeks of the pandemic and how this population adapted to an overwhelming information environment. Using the information resilience conceptual framework, I describe how van dwellers adapted in a time when a myriad of information and misinformation was circulating. The van dweller community, and their supporters, banded together to provide resources and safe spaces in a time of crisis.



12:45pm - 1:00pm
ID: 248 / PS19: 4
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agreed to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am22/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Behavior (information behavior; information-seeking behavior; information needs and use; information practices; usability; user experience; human-computer interaction; human-technology interaction; human-AI interaction)
Keywords: Information work; information practices; diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI); social justice; intersectionality

Intersectional Information Work Practices: Surfacing Care Amidst COVID-19

Alex Poole

Drexel University, USA

This paper brings together and enriches the heretofore dispersed literature on information work and information practices under the auspices of Critical Race Theory (CRT), intersectionality, and care work. Using the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States as the context for an exploratory, qualitative case study, we propose the concept of intersectional information work practices (IIWP) to denote the cluster of information-centric tasks in which Black women care workers engaged. Seeking, scanning, searching, monitoring, finding, receiving, retrieving, using, and sharing information—Black women carers performed each of these IIWPs in dealing with health care providers, tests, illness and treatment, wellness, logistics, and avoiding misinformation. An IIWP lens sheds light on the often all too often invisible labor of Black women carers. Such a lens also brings into high relief the importance of scrutinizing power and (in)equity, race, gender, and class in exploring foundational Information Science concepts.



 
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