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Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Session
Paper Session 17: Professional Information Practices
Time:
Tuesday, 01/Nov/2022:
11:30am - 1:00pm

Session Chair: Judith Van Alstyne, University of Rochester, USA
Location: Rivers, Ballroom Level, Wyndham


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Presentations
11:30am - 12:00pm
ID: 262 / PS17: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agreed to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am22/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Behavior (information behavior; information-seeking behavior; information needs and use; information practices; usability; user experience; human-computer interaction; human-technology interaction; human-AI interaction)
Keywords: Information behaviors; knowledge infrastructure; homelessness; smart and connected communities

From Communities of Practice to Smart and Connected Communities: Information Sharing Practices Among Social Service Providers

Stephen Slota, Ishan Nigam, Kenneth Fleischmann, Sherri Greenberg, David Cruz

The University of Texas at Austin, USA

To be a smart and connected community is an aspiration and orientation. A goal of smart and connected communities is to make more effective and consistent use of data, information, and technology, and in many ways to operate at a critical junction between community members and an imagined future structured around a particular vision of the role of government, the role of participation, and often-conflicting visions of what these might become. This paper reports findings from 32 semi-structured interviews with stakeholders in the City of Austin Continuum of Care(CoC), a collaborative group of organizations working to end homelessness in the Austin/Travis County region, as well as critical analysis of their collaborative and siloed data resources. The key themes that emerged in this case study include the continual process of ‘becoming’ a smart and connected community, focusing on the development and ‘accretion’ of data and informational infrastructure, and its impact on the communities of practice related to providing services to people experiencing homelessness. The information behaviors of the stakeholders of the CoC demonstrates ongoing movement towards more collaborative resolutions of issues of data quality and interoperability, alongside a negotiation of the role of data-intensive structuring of collaborations and work.



12:00pm - 12:30pm
ID: 120 / PS17: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agreed to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am22/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Behavior (information behavior; information-seeking behavior; information needs and use; information practices; usability; user experience; human-computer interaction; human-technology interaction; human-AI interaction)
Keywords: Information creation; community health workers; LGBTQIA+ populations; medical librarians; action research

Understanding the Information Creation Practices of LGBTQIA+ Community Health Workers

Vanessa Kitzie1, Nick Vera1, Travis Wagner2

1University of South Carolina, USA; 2University of Maryland, USA

This paper reports on preliminary findings from an action research project partnering health sciences librarians with community health workers (CHWs) who are LGBTQIA+ to create information resources for the CHW's community. Findings report on twelve virtual semistructured interviews with CHWs from South Carolina and eleven virtual brainstorming meetings between CHWs and health sciences librarians. The authors analyzed verbatim interview and meeting transcripts using a combination of deductive and inductive qualitative coding. Findings demonstrate 1) external barriers constrain and motivate information creation; 2) the presence of preexisting information, knowledge, and resources within the CHWs' communities; 3) that CHW-librarian pairs brainstormed how to codify and iterate what already exists; 4) that librarians adopted a reference role when brainstorming and suggested resource ideas within and outside of the CHWs' communities. Implications include strategies that researchers and practitioners can adopt to leverage existing experiential and embodied knowledge within LGBTQIA+ communities.



12:30pm - 12:45pm
ID: 295 / PS17: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agreed to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am22/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Behavior (information behavior; information-seeking behavior; information needs and use; information practices; usability; user experience; human-computer interaction; human-technology interaction; human-AI interaction)
Keywords: information use, data reuse, multiple data streams, expert, geologic systems

Human-Driven Models: A Case Study of Geologists as They Engage with Data for Decision Making

Donald Keefer, Catherine Blake

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

The value of geologic data is well established and demonstrated by efforts such as EarthChem and EarthCube. Although these communities are active in the documentation and preservation of geologic data, more work is needed to understand how geologists use this data to address specific problems. In this preliminary analysis, we focus on the information behaviors of professional geologists as they engage with multiple data streams to make decisions. Using semi-structured interviews and grounded theory, our findings document how a single data point can drive changes to existing models. Responses also show that geologists view their experiences in data collection as critical and they use their knowledge and experience to iteratively re-assess the context and fitness of their data as they search for coherent interpretations that resolve data-model conflicts.



12:45pm - 1:00pm
ID: 242 / PS17: 4
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agreed to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am22/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society (biases in information systems or society or data; social aspects of computerization; digital culture; information & society; information & communication technology for development (ICT4D); information for sustainable dev)
Keywords: user-centered design, human-technology interaction, information seeking, welding, smart hand tools

Information Needs of Blue-Collar Workers: Welding Challenges and the Potential of Smart Welding Tools

Katherine Hill, Rachel Tunis, Pablo Pejlatowicz, Kenneth Fleischmann, Sherri Greenberg, Raul Longoria, Jose Bendana

The University of Texas at Austin, USA

Research on work and occupations in the information field have largely focused on white-collar jobs. Little is known about the information and technology experiences and behaviors of workers in blue-collar jobs. This study examines the user experiences of current welding tools and welding training and asks how integration of information feedback through smart technology in welding tools can help welders do their jobs safer, easier, and faster. We conducted 14 in-depth interviews with members of <ORGANIZATION>, a student organization that designs, builds, and tests race cars. Participants experienced frustrations with the dangerous and technical setup and the limited vision and information feedback from welding tools. Many argued that the integration of smart technology into welding tools could improve their experience. These innovations could lead to faster training and reduced attrition in the welding industry. Further, this research points to the urgent need for more research on blue-collar workers in the information field.



 
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