Conference Agenda (All times are shown in Mountain Daylight Time)

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Session
Paper Session 11: Health Information Behavior
Time:
Monday, 01/Nov/2021:
10:00am - 11:30am

Session Chair: Yung-Sheng Chang, The University of Texas at Austin, USA
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott


As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.


External Resource:
Presentations
10:00am - 10:30am
ID: 142 / PS-11: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Health information; Health behavior change; Trust; TPB; SEM; TTM

Exploring the Effect of Rational Factors and Trust in Health Behavior Change

Jiaqi Deng1, Shijuan Li2, Preben Hansen3

1SUN Yat-Sen University, People's Republic of China; 2Peking University, People's Republic of China; 3Stockholm University, Sweden

This study examines how rational factors and trust modify health behaviors and various stages of trust mediate the rational factors in behavior changing through four stages of it. By integrating factors of TPB and various stages of trust, a health behavior change framework was proposed. Quantitative data on TPB, trust and behavior change were collected from Chinese youths through online survey. SEM was applied to analyze the data from 448 valid questionnaires to verify it. The findings show: Both TPB and trust constructs have significant impacts on modifying health behavior change; Trust mediates the effect of perceived behavioral control on health behavior change, while the stages of site content evaluation and longer-term engagement of trust act as partial mediators; Relationships existed between TPB factors and trust stages. This study advances the understanding of health behavior change with regards to rational factors and trust stages and provides implications for stakeholders.



10:30am - 11:00am
ID: 227 / PS-11: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Surrogates’ health information seeking, Online health information, Information source, Information evaluation, Information sharing

Predicting Surrogates’ Health Information Seeking Behavior via Information Source and Information Evaluation

Yung-Sheng Chang, Yan Zhang, Jacek Gwizdka

The University of Texas at Austin, USA

This study investigates surrogates’ health information sharing behavior through information sources and information evaluation. A lab-based experiment was conducted. Twenty-five participants read five scenarios, each with three preselected webpages from a government, a commercial, and an online forum source. Participants had to decide whether to share the information with an imaginary friend of theirs and provide rationales (an indication of information evaluation). Content analysis and mixed effects logistic regression models were performed. Government websites were recommended for sharing the most, followed by commercial and online forum sources. Criteria predicting participants’ intention to share information were different for each information source. The content’s usefulness and trustworthiness were two criteria predicting participants’ intention to share commercial websites. Source’s trustworthiness and individual relevant criterion were two significant predictors for government sources. Source’s trustworthiness had negative effects on sharing information from online forums. 13.3% of the information evaluation involved using both positive and negative criteria.



11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 100 / PS-11: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Information seeking; information avoidance; cancer patients; interviews; selective exposure and avoidance

Avoiding Information During Serious Illness: Insights into the Information Behavior of Cancer Patients

Jesper Gabs Jensen, Emil Petersen, Tove Faber Frandsen

University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

Cancer patients seek information about their health and illness using many different approaches. Some prefer to seek intensively whereas other avoid seeking information. Over the course of the cancer continuum an individual may meet their needs using several different approaches. In this paper, we explore how avoidance can be an approach used as part of information seeking activities and not just as an alternative approach. Interviews with six current and former cancer patients were conducted and analyzed. We identify the different patterns of information seeking among the interviewees ranging from seeking intensively to avoiding information. Furthermore, we find that exposing yourself selectively to information as well as avoiding some information can be strategies to protect the information seeker from information the individual is not able to cope with. This study indicates that the information seeking approaches are overlapping.