Conference Agenda (All times are shown in Mountain Daylight Time)

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
Date: Sunday, 31/Oct/2021
11:00am - 12:30pmNorth-South Scholarly Collaboration: Opportunities and Experiences in Africa (ASIS&T Africa Chapter and SIG-III)
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 189 / [Single Presentation of ID 189]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Developing countries; Exchange programs; North-South collaboration; Visiting professors; Knowledge sharing

Diane Sonnenwald1, Ina Fourie2, Abebe Rorissa3, Heidi Julien4, Jaya Raju5, Daniel Alemneh6

1UCD, Ireland; 2University of Pretoria, South Africa; 3University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA; 4University at Buffalo, SUNY, USA; 5University of Cape Town, South Africa; 6University of North Texas, USA

North-South scholarly collaboration and academic exchange programs help to address the challenges experienced by developing countries in Africa and elsewhere, and provide unique benefits to scholars in developed countries. Many academics in the global north, however, have limited, or no, information about opportunities to visit academics and institutions in developing countries and those in such countries do not have contacts to whom they can reach out. The intention of the panel is to stimulate future north-south collaborations by increasing awareness of both funded opportunities and low budget initiatives for scholarly exchanges and collaborations, benefits for scholars and their institutions in developed and developing countries, and best practices with respect to north-south collaborations and scholarly exchanges. This panel is sponsored by the Africa Chapter and SIG-III.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmMotivation, Building Relationships, and the Role of Belonging in Distance Learning (SIG-ED)
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 205 / [Single Presentation of ID 205]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: distance learning, belonging, mentoring, graduate students, undergraduate students

Rachel Williams1, Danielle Pollock1, Agnes Mainka2, Michael Brinkmeier2, Elisaweta Ossovski2

1Simmons College, USA; 2Institute for Computer Science Universität Osnabrück, Germany

This SIG-ED panel addresses the role of belonging in distance learning in a variety of learning contexts, including typical online courses as well as in independent studies and other mentoring contexts. The panel explores the impact of belonging on student success and considers how instructors’ choices in course design, technology use, mentoring, and other aspects of distance learning can enhance or detract from fostering a sense of belonging.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmAntiracism in the LIS Profession: Not Just Lip Service
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 154 / [Single Presentation of ID 154]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Antiracism in LIS, Racism as Public Health Threat, LIS Core Principles in Battling Racism, Actions and Initiatives, Equity in Service & Access

Rong Tang1, Xan Goodman2, Rebecca Davis1, Jia Tina Du3, David Leonard4

1Simmons University, USA; 2University of Nevada Las Vegas, USA; 3University of South Australia, Australia; 4Boston Public Library, USA

With rising cases of brutality, gun violence, and racial injustice towards particularly the Black and AAPI (Asians, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders) communities, racism is being recognized and declared as an emergency and public health threat. Diversity, equity, and antiracism are core to the Library and Information Science (LIS) profession as we strive to uphold the principle of “libraries serve humanities” and the motto of “free to all.” During this extended period of ‘racial-injustice as a public crisis,’ what are the roles of LIS professionals in battling racism, violence, and other systems of oppression? This panel session features experienced LIS professionals and educators who specialize in DEI, reporting their activities, stories, and thoughts on antiracism. A breakout room activity is envisioned following panelists’ presentations, with participants discussing and sharing their antiracism initiatives. Participants will also brainstorm the next course of action in the LIS profession’s journey in battling racism.

 

Date: Monday, 01/Nov/2021
8:00am - 9:30amConducting and Publishing Research in Developing Countries: Challenges and Solutions (SIG-III and ASIS&T Africa and South Asia Chapters)
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 120 / [Single Presentation of ID 120]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Conducting LIS research, Publishing LIS research, Developing countries, Diverse LIS researchers, Inclusive LIS research

Devendra Potnis1, Bhakti Gala2, Edda Tandi Lwoga3, Md. Anwarul Islam4, Nosheen Fatima Warraich5, Humphrey Keah6, Abebe Rorissa1

1University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA; 2Central University of Gujarat, India; 3College of Business Education, Tanzania; 4University of Dhaka, Bangladesh; 5University of the Punjab, Pakistan; 6FAO of the United Nations, Kenya

Most of the knowledge in the library and information science (LIS) discipline is created and published by researchers in developed countries. Two roundtable sessions of ASIS&T SIG-III with the ASIS&T Africa Chapter and ASIS&T South Asia Chapter, in early 2021, confirmed “the lack of a conducive research environment” as the primary reason for this inequality in the discipline and called for systematic efforts, like this panel, to (a) create awareness about this inequality and (b) start building a global support system for LIS researchers in developing countries. In the first 30 minutes of this panel, six LIS scholars with cultural roots, academic training, and research experience in developing countries will illustrate common challenges to conducting and publishing research in developing countries. In the next 30 minutes, attendees will be divided into groups, with each group facilitated by a panelist, to brainstorm solutions for addressing the challenges related to academic training for conducting and publishing research, accessing resources, institutional support, opportunities for research collaboration and funding, fieldwork, analyzing data, composing manuscripts, and finding mentors, among others. In the last 30 minutes, each group will present its findings.

 
10:00am - 11:30amHistory and Heritage Update (SIG-HFIS and SIG-STI)
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 131 / [Single Presentation of ID 131]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Heritage, Humanities, Information history, Information Science, Curator’s Working Group

Robert Montoya1, Deanna Morrow Hall2, Michael Buckland3, Paul Daguid3

1University of California, Los Angeles, USA; 2Corporate Information Resources, Inc., USA; 3University of California, Berkeley, USA

Major new developments in the history and heritage of ASIS&T and of information science generally are presented. First, the progress of the ASIS&T Curator’s Working Group’s strategic plan for ASIST’s knowledge management and for stewardship of its heritage resources will be presented by Deanna Hall, the ASIS&T Curator. Second, the ambitious program of the ASIS&T History Committee to encourage attention to historical work by promoting open access to past publications and the creation of guides to resources will be reported by the Committee chair, Michael Buckland. Third, the emergence of extensive humanities research on information history, newly summarized in new encyclopedic collection Information: a historical companion (2021), will be introduced and characterized by Paul Duguid, a contributor and co-editor.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmUpdates of Information Standards and Standardization Efforts (ASIS&T Standards Committee)
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 268 / [Single Presentation of ID 268]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: data standards, information standards, open data, knowledge organization systems

Mark Needleman1, Marjorie Hlava2, Marcia Zeng3, Timothy Dickey3

1Florida Center for Library Automation, USA; 2Access Innovations, USA; 3Kent State University, USA

This panel, sponsored by the ASIS&T Standards Committee, has two purposes. First, the panel reports the most recent activities of the national and international standards in the field of information science and technologies in which the ASIS&T Standards Committee and members have been involved. Second, the panel will focus on a number of significant standardization efforts, their important roles, and the challenges in dealing with semantic conflicts while addressing inclusion and relevance to ensure non-bias in information representation and the FAIRness of data. Those efforts have led to the globally adopted standard systems, vocabularies, and schemas, which will be introduced by this panel.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmFoundations of Information Science (SIG-HFIS, SIG-ED, and SIG-STI)
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 129 / [Single Presentation of ID 129]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Theory
Keywords: China; context, foundations, information science, information seeking.

Michael Buckland1, Marcia Bates2, Wayne de Fremery3, Lin Wang4

1University of California, Berkeley, USA; 2University of California, Los Angeles, USA; 3Sogang University, Korea; 4Hangzhou Dianzi University, People's Republic of China

The foundations of information science define our field and, thereby, our professional identity. It follows that if our our professional identity is to be equitable, diverse, inclusive, and relevant, then the foundations of our field should also be. Three diverse contributions to the foundations of information science will illustrate diverse approaches to making information science more inclusive will be illustrated by experienced panelists with different backgrounds: Recuperating neglected work; exploring alternative methods; and drawing attention to undocumented work. Marcia Bates will revisit early work on information seeking. Michael Buckland and Wayne de Fremery will demonstrate an alternative approach to the problematic concept of “context.” Lin Wang will introduce aspects of the early history of information science in China.

 

Date: Tuesday, 02/Nov/2021
9:00am - 10:30amExamining Concepts of the Public: Who is Served by Information Services? (SIG-HFIS and SIG-CR)
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 252 / [Single Presentation of ID 252]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Social diversity, library communities, public libraries, Information Science, vulnerable populations, community archives

Jeremy Abbott, Michelle Caswell, Gregory Leazer, Robert Montoya, Safiya Noble

University of California, Los Angeles, USA

The goal of this panel is to define foundational social “boundaries” that libraries typically consider when defining their constituents. Who do librarians, archivists and information specialists serve? In the last decade we have witnessed a general pivot in nomenclature, from the “user” to “community.” What is behind the evolution in this terminology? Is this a simple change in the words we use, or does this reflect a new conceptualization of clientele or “the public?” The goal of this panel is to define foundational social and epistemic “boundaries” that libraries and information institutions typically consider when defining their constituents of interest. As a HFIS-sponsored panel, the idea is to define foundational segments of the 'public sphere' that are of particular note in contemporary social, cultural, political, and geographic spaces and circumstances.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmQuality, Reuse, and Governance of Open Data (SIG-OIM)
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 133 / [Single Presentation of ID 133]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Open data, Data quality, Data reuse, Data governance, Open government

Fang Wang1, Hongzhi Zhu1, Yejun Wu2

1Nankai University, People's Republic of China; 2Louisiana State University, USA

In recent years, the amount of open data from governments and academic communities have increased rapidly. Open data are expected to promote the transparency and accountability of governments and academic communities, enable public participation, and facilitate digital innovation. However, open data are still facing problems such as unsatisfactory quality, insufficient data governance, increasing preservation cost and ineffective data reuse at present. This panel will invite experts in related fields to discuss the quality, reuse, and governance of open data, and propose feasible solutions from an international perspective. We will verify and promote the action plan in practice, and have more academic discussion with ASIS&T and relevant academic communities.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmDocumenting Information Processes and Practices: Paradata, Provenance Metadata, Life-Cycles, and Pipelines
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 181 / [Single Presentation of ID 181]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: pipelines; processes; practices; paradata; provenance metadata

Isto Huvila1, Jane Greenberg2, Olle Sköld1, Andrea Thomer3, Ciaran Trace4, Xintong Zhao2

1Uppsala University, Sweden; 2Drexel University, USA; 3University of Michigan, USA; 4The University of Texas at Austin, USA

Processes and practices are pertinent elements of the information landscape. This panel presents research on documentation and description of processes and practices in the information field addressing: 1) how different conceptualizations of processes and practices influence how they emerge as describable entities; 2) what different approaches to document and describe processes and practices exist and have been proposed in information science and technology research; 3) what aspects of processes and practices different documentation approaches capture, make visible and invisible; and 4) what novel insights from the current state-of-the-art research can be drawn to support practitioners in different areas of the information field, including knowledge organization, information management, information literacy instruction, and development of information systems and services.