Conference Agenda (All times are shown in Mountain Daylight Time)

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Date: Friday, 29/Oct/2021
8:00am - 12:00pmThe 17th Annual Social Informatics Research Symposium and the 3rd Annual Information Ethics and Policy Workshop: Sociotechnical Perspectives on Equity, Inclusion, and Justice (SIG-SI and SIG-IEP)
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 151 / [Single Presentation of ID 151]: 1
Workshops
4 hours
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: social informatics, ethics, policy, equity, social justice

Colin Rhinesmith1, Kolina Koltai2, Xiaohua Zhu3, Madelyn Sanfilippo4

1Simmons University, USA; 2University of Washington, USA; 3University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA; 4University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

The ASIS&T Special Interest Group Social Informatics (SIG-SI) and Information Ethics and Policy (IEP) will present this half-day workshop. The workshop’s theme aligns well with the ASIS&T 2021 Annual Meeting theme and offers an opportunity to focus scholarly attention on the social, cultural, political, and economic shaping of sociotechnical systems and their consequences. We invite a range of scholarly sociotechnical inquiries alongside ethical, practical, and policy perspectives across a range of disciplines and sectors. The workshop will provide a physical and virtual space to share and exchange experiences and ideas or suggest theories and directions for future work among international SI researchers and practitioners. The workshop will broadly appeal to the ASIS&T community, particularly to researchers interested in sociotechnical and ethical information or technology issues. We also welcome professionals from industry, ICT communities, and human rights organizations. Our aims include the following: collaboratively produce short- and long-term research agendas to address pressing critical and diversity concerns around technology; facilitate collaboration; and strategically prioritize research that will support empirically driven policy making, ethical decision-making, and practice for social justice and well-being with pervasive and emerging sociotechnical systems.

 

Date: Saturday, 30/Oct/2021
8:00am - 12:00pmArtificial Intelligence in Information Research and Practice: Fostering Interconnected Communities (SIG-AI)
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 246 / [Single Presentation of ID 246]: 1
Workshops
4 hours
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Artificial Intelligence in library and information science; AI applications in library and information environments

Soo Young Rieh1, Clara M. Chu2, Dania Bilal3

1The University of Texas at Austin, USA; 2University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA; 3University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA

This half-day workshop aims to support and advance an ASIS&T AI community by connecting AI research and practice in library and information environments. We invite a broad range of participants who are already engaged in developing AI applications and solutions and are interested in learning about the opportunities and challenges in AI research, by discussing how to integrate empirical research findings into AI development. Through a panel discussion, lightning talks, a brainstorming session, breakout group conversations, and a plenary discussion, the workshop will provide an opportunity for participants to obtain feedback on preliminary and ongoing work, identify pressing challenges and critical questions of AI in library and information environments, and develop new research problems and approaches.

 
1:00pm - 5:00pmToward a Shared Vision of Privacy Protections in Public Libraries
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 274 / [Single Presentation of ID 274]: 1
Workshops
4 hours
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Privacy and Ethics
Keywords: Privacy Protections, Public Library

Masooda Bashir1, Alison Macrina2, Bill Marden3, Celeste Choate4, Marshall Breeding5

1University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA; 2Library Freedom Project, USA; 3The New York Public Library, USA; 4The Urbana Free Library, USA; 5Library Technology Guides, USA

This workshop is dedicated to patron-privacy protections in public libraries welcomes all participants who are public librarians, information technology experts, or academic researchers interested in data privacy. Prof. Masooda Bashir, who was recently awarded an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) /National Leadership Grant (NLG) to study this topic, will lead the workshop. Participants will learn about new research in this field, hear from experts on their approaches to patron privacy, and have an opportunity to discuss possible steps forward for public libraries in the United States. Panelists will share how different libraries, with varying clienteles, deal with patron privacy concerns. Discussions will culminate in a draft for an open-access guide that identifies the specific challenges public libraries face in protecting patron privacy, lists best practices, and establishes a network of collaborators who will develop a shared vision to tackle this problem. The workshop aims to support public libraries’ ongoing efforts to promote equitable access to information and safeguard users’ privacy, particularly for low-income populations and minority communities, who are often both frequent users of public-library digital resources and at risk for violations of their personal privacy.

 

Date: Sunday, 31/Oct/2021
11:00am - 12:30pmPaper Session 02: Student Award Session
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Howard Rosenbaum, Indiana University, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
11:00am - 11:30am
ID: 301 / PS-02: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Digital Information, Visual Arts

Creative Connections: The Value of Digital Information and its Effective Management for Sustainable Contemporary Visual Art Practice

Laura Molloy

Committee on Data of the International Science Council (CODATA), France

My paper will provide an overview of the main themes and selected key findings of my doctoral dissertation, ‘Creative Connections: the value of digital information objects and their effective management for sustainable contemporary visual art practice’. This study provides a novel analysis of visual art making in the UK.

Based on evidence derived from a series of detailed qualitative case-study interviews, the research clarifies the value of digital information use in contemporary visual art practice in the UK and the current digital object management skills base in the visual art community. A practitioner-focused, qualitative methodology produces deep understanding of how artists spend their time and value particular resources in making their work.

The study findings provide an evidence base for the use of policy makers in the visual arts sector and for providers of education and training in the visual arts, with profound implications for the fit-to-need of current curricula in tertiary and professional art education. This study analyses and clarifies the extent to which the information sciences are reaching this profession, and how the professional art community may benefit from engagement with information science concepts and practices as a tool in the struggle to stay in practice.



11:30am - 12:00pm
ID: 303 / PS-02: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Digital Information, Visual Arts

Bridging Sight and Insight: Visualization in Action Among Digital Humanists

Rongqian Ma

University of Pittsburgh, USA

Digital humanities (DH) have gradually developed into an interdisciplinary field and a “battleground” between different research methods and conventions. As increasing numbers of scholars entered the DH landscape from various knowledge domains, one central concern was how digital technologies influenced the landscape of DH, which scholars have discussed intensively but without achieving agreement. These theoretical discussions, however, did not provide empirical insight into the actual shape of DH under the technological influence. This dissertation study addresses this broad concern focusing on one specific, emerging DH practice, i.e., the visualization practice. Widely presented in research outputs and applied during research processes, visualization embodies cross-field collaborative practices among DH scholars and functions as an indicator for the field’s evolution. I take a Latourian approach to investigate how digital humanists, defined as any researchers or practitioners engaging in DH work, leverage visualizations as “immutable mobiles” to produce, transfer, and communicate humanities knowledge, both in research outputs and during the research process. I apply a sequential, explanatory mixed-methods design, quantitatively examining the use patterns of visual inscriptions in DH journal articles over the last ten years, then proceeding to the underlying, implicit decision-making processes and practices of visualization among digital humanists of.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmPaper Session 04: Transformation, Pedagogy, and Information Literacy
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Miyoung Chong, University of Virginia, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
ID: 195 / PS-04: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Archival education; Library and Information Science education; ethics of care; online learning; pedagogy

“It Makes Me Sad”: Archival Pedagogy in a Time of Covid-19

Alex Poole1, Jane Zhang2

1Drexel University, USA; 2Catholic University of America, USA

Despite COVID-19’s devastating repercussions on higher education, scholars have yet to address its impact on Library and Information Science pedagogy. This exploratory qualitative case study centers on how archival educators weathered the onslaught of the pandemic. Drawing upon semistructured interviews with 31 archival educators and documentary evidence, this research addresses the sudden shift to online education; the concomitant loss of hands-on work opportunities and the workarounds educators developed; affectivity and an emergent ethics of pedagogical care among students and educators; and educators’ lessons learned from the pandemic and their future projections regarding archival education. This paper illuminates the evolving landscape of pedagogy and its attendant challenges preparing the next generation of archival professionals during an unprecedented period of duress.



ID: 196 / PS-04: 2
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Data science education; pedagogy; Library and Information Science; iSchools; data science

LEADING the Way: A New Model for Data Science Education

Alex Poole

Drexel University, USA

Addressing the data skills gap, namely the superabundance of data and the lack of human capital to exploit it, this paper argues that iSchools and Library and Information Science programs are ideal venues for data science education. It unpacks two case studies: the LIS Education and Data Science for the National Digital Platform (LEADS-4-NDP) project (2017-2019), and the LIS Education and Data Science-Integrated Network Group (LEADING) project (2020-2023). These IMLS-funded initiatives respond to four national digital platform challenges: LIS faculty prepared to teach data science and mentor the next generation of educators and practitioners, an underdeveloped pedagogical infrastructure, scattered and inconsistent data science education opportunities for students and current information professionals, and an immature data science network. LEADS and LEADING have made appreciable collaborative, interdisciplinary contributions to the data science education community; these projects comprise an essential part of the long-awaited and much-needed national digital platform.



2:00pm - 2:15pm
ID: 290 / PS-04: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Fourth Industrial Revolution
Keywords: Digital readiness, digital maturity, digital readiness assessment, digital transformation, Africa

Digital Readiness Assessment of Countries in Africa: A Case Study Research

Shimelis Assefa1, Abebe Rorissa2, Daniel Alemneh3

1University of Denver, USA; 2University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA; 3University of North Texas, USA

There is an increasing uptake of digital technologies across African countries. Public, private, and government services have adopted digital technologies to improve work processes, create jobs, and better service delivery. This short paper seeks to answer: 1) What is the current state of digital readiness in African countries? 2) Do existing digital readiness assessment tools and metrics help to assess the digital readiness of countries in Africa? Analysis of publicly available data from Cisco index of readiness score and Broadband speed ranking by cable.co.uk, reveal that: 1) African countries' digital readiness score is below the global average of 11.96, on a scale of 0 to 25 (except Tunisia with score of 12.05); and 2) African countries' broadband speed is below the global mean speed of 25Mbps (mean speed of 4.51 and 3.80 Mbps for sub-Saharan Africa and North Africa, respectively). Second, analysis of various assessment tools show that the existing metrics can't be used as is to diagnose and evaluate Africa's digital readiness. Instead factors such as infrastructure; last-mile connectivity to homes, schools, etc.; and skill gaps should be considered. This study shows the need for an appropriate assessment tools so countries in Africa prioritize efforts to embrace digital readiness.



2:15pm - 2:30pm
ID: 182 / PS-04: 4
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Tattoos; information; information behavior, personal information management.

Tattoos and Information: Mapping the Landscape of Tattoo Research

Maja Krtalic, Jennifer Campbell-Meier, Rachel Bell

Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

This paper is the initial discussion of a larger project Tattoo and Information, exploring tattoos as an information and communication phenomenon from multicultural perspectives and various use purposes. The overall purpose of the project is to provide insight into information seeking and experience in the context of tattoos in order to identify information literacy, visual literacy and cultural literacy skills as well as communications skills necessary for a successful tattoo experience in Aotearoa New Zealand. In this paper, we present findings from the literature review accompanied by preliminary insights from four interviews. The findings reflect thematic areas of research focusing on tattoos and gaps that exist. We used interviews to capture what topics emerge from tattoo narratives and whether they align with topics and gaps identified in the literature review. Based on the findings, we identify areas for future research.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmPaper Session 07: Information Interactions with the Healthcare System
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Souvick Ghosh, San José State University, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
4:00pm - 4:30pm
ID: 137 / PS-07: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Alpha-Gal meat allergy, clinician–patient relationship, clinical notes

Using Symptoms and Healthcare Encounters to Capture a Rare Disease: A Study of Clinical Notes of the Alpha-Gal Meat Allergy

Yuanye Ma, Mary Grace Flaherty

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA

This paper examines clinical notes to identify reported symptoms and investigate patient-provider communication processes in alpha-gal syndrome (AGS). Clinical notes appear to be a credible and stable source of research where the researcher can find information regarding both symptoms and environmental factors of AGS. Compilation of notes could be used for a checklist to aid in diagnosis. This study analyzed clinicians’ notes in patient records retrieved from the Electronic Medical Record Search Engine (EMERSE). The most reported symptoms fell into four general categories: skin (42%), inflammation (17%), gastrointestinal (20%), and anaphylaxis (21%). Environmental triggers were also commonly reported. This in-depth analysis of clinical notes of AGS can serve as a basis for future automation of rare disease analysis; moreover, it provides a basic understanding of the granularity of information that an electronic health record (EHR) may provide for rare disease identification.



4:30pm - 4:45pm
ID: 206 / PS-07: 2
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Information behavior, Vaccination decision-making, COVID-19 vaccine

Health Information Behavior in the Context of Medical Decision-Making: An Exploratory Study Based on Vaccination in Beijing

Yuhao Zhang, Guangchun Zheng

Renming University, People's Republic of China

COVID-19 vaccination could be the most economical and effective public health intervention to prevent and control novel coronavirus. Beijing is one of the first regions in China to implement the COVID-19 vaccination policy, we conducted semi-structured interview on 20 participants with past vaccination AND/OR COVID-19 vaccination decision-making. This study summarizes the consistency and particularity in the context of decision-making in terms of information sources, information content and information behavior.



4:45pm - 5:00pm
ID: 279 / PS-07: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: LGBTQ+ populations, care-seeking, information seeking, information use, incidental information acquisition

Discrimination in Healthcare and LGBTQ+ Information and Care-Seeking Behaviors

Lindsay Brown, Tiffany Veinot

University of Michigan, USA

Members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning, plus (LGBTQ+) community may face discrimination in healthcare, which can subsequently impact information and care-seeking patterns. A tendency to avoid or delay health care is particularly concerning for LGBTQ+ people who faces both physical and mental health disparities. This paper presents a narrative review of literature on healthcare discrimination, LGBTQ+ care-seeking, and associated information behaviors in order to generate a preliminary model of LGBTQ+ decision-making around care and well-being, called the Model of the Pathways to LGBTQ+ Well-Being. This model can be used to investigate links between information behavior and relevant health behaviors and outcomes in a marginalized population.

 

Date: Monday, 01/Nov/2021
8:00am - 9:30amPaper Session 09: Text and Data Processing
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Haihua Chen, University of North Texas, USA
 
8:00am - 8:30am
ID: 184 / PS-09: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Wikipedia article quality assessment, language representation model, deep ensemble learning

Measuring Quality of Wikipedia Articles by Feature Fusion-Based Stack Learning

Jingrui Hou, Jiangnan Li, Ping Wang

Wuhan University, People's Republic of China

Online open-source knowledge repository such as Wikipedia has become an increasingly important source for users to access knowledge. However, due to its large volume, it is challenging to evaluate Wikipedia article quality manually. To fill this gap, we propose a novel approach named “feature fusion-based stack learning” to assess the quality of Wikipedia articles. Pre-trained language models including BERT (Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers) and ELMo (Embeddings from Language Models) are applied to extract semantic information in Wikipedia content. The feature fusion framework consisting of semantic and statistical features is built and fed into an out-of-sample (OOS) stacking model, which includes both machine learning and deep learning models. We compare the performance of proposed model with some existing models with different metrics extensively, and conduct ablation studies to prove the effectiveness of our framework and OOS stacking. Generally, the experiment shows that our method is much better than state-of-the-art models.



8:30am - 9:00am
ID: 262 / PS-09: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: semantic alignment, fitness assessment, data selection, multiple data streams, data practices

The Reproducible Data Reuse (ReDaR) Framework to Capture and Assess Multiple Data Streams

Donald Keefer, Catherine Blake

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

Much of the literature in knowledge discovery from data (KDD) focuses on algorithms that are faster and more accurate at capturing patterns in a given data set. However, answering a research question is fundamentally connected with how well the data is aligned with the questions being asked. Thus, data selection is one of the most important steps to ensure that models produced from the KDD process are useful in practice. A lack of documentation about the data selection rationale and the transformations needed to semantically align the data streams prevents others from reproducing the research and obfuscates development of best practices in data integration. Our goal in this paper is to provide KDD practitioners with a framework that brings together theories in provenance, information quality, and contextual reasoning, to enable researchers to achieve a semantically aligned dataset with data selection, description, and documentation based on an application-focused assessment.



9:00am - 9:15am
ID: 273 / PS-09: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Organic Materials, Automated Knowledge Extraction, Named-Entity-Recognition, Text Mining, Deep Learning

Text to Insight: Accelerating Organic Materials Knowledge Extraction via Deep Learning

Xintong Zhao1, Steven Lopez2, Semion Saikin3, Xiaohua Hu1, Jane Greenberg1

1Drexel University, USA; 2Northeastern University, USA; 3Kebotix, Inc., USA

Scientific literature is one of the most significant resources for sharing knowledge. Researchers turn to scientific literature as a first step in designing an experiment. Given the extensive and growing volume of literature, the common approach of reading and manually extracting knowledge is too time consuming, creating a bottleneck in the research cycle. This challenge spans nearly every scientific domain. For the materials science, experimental data distributed across millions of publications are extremely helpful for predicting materials properties and the design of novel materials. However, only recently researchers have explored computational approaches for knowledge extraction primarily for inorganic materials. This study aims to explore knowledge extraction for organic materials. We built a research dataset composed of 855 annotated and 708,376 unannotated sentences drawn from 92,667 abstracts. We used named-entity-recognition (NER) with BiLSTM-CNN-CRF deep learning model to automatically extract key knowledge from literature. Early-phase results show a high potential for automated knowledge extraction. The paper presents our findings and a framework for supervised knowledge extraction that can be adapted to other scientific domains.



9:15am - 9:30am
ID: 234 / PS-09: 4
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: book reviews, text mining, affective terms, mood, emotion

Moods in Book Reviews: Text Mining Approach

Hyerim Cho, Denice Adkins, Jenny Bossaller, Heather Moulaison-Sandy

University of Missouri, USA

Spiteri and Pecoskie (2018) proposed a taxonomy of terms to describe emotion and tone in novels. We tested those terms against 5144 full-text book reviews from the New York Times Book Review to discover whether the proposed terms were used in published reviews to describe books, and of those terms used, which were most used. Findings demonstrate that the terms chosen by Spiteri and Pecoskie are used in professional book reviews, though some may be used in multiple ways, rather than only related to emotional content. Results of this work contribute to a larger scale project of testing machine models of identifying emotional content in books and ultimately being able to create automated media recommendation systems that include emotion as an identifier.

 
10:00am - 11:30amPaper Session 11: Health Information Behavior
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Yung-Sheng Chang, The University of Texas at Austin, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
10:00am - 10:30am
ID: 142 / PS-11: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Health information; Health behavior change; Trust; TPB; SEM; TTM

Exploring the Effect of Rational Factors and Trust in Health Behavior Change

Jiaqi Deng1, Shijuan Li2, Preben Hansen3

1SUN Yat-Sen University, People's Republic of China; 2Peking University, People's Republic of China; 3Stockholm University, Sweden

This study examines how rational factors and trust modify health behaviors and various stages of trust mediate the rational factors in behavior changing through four stages of it. By integrating factors of TPB and various stages of trust, a health behavior change framework was proposed. Quantitative data on TPB, trust and behavior change were collected from Chinese youths through online survey. SEM was applied to analyze the data from 448 valid questionnaires to verify it. The findings show: Both TPB and trust constructs have significant impacts on modifying health behavior change; Trust mediates the effect of perceived behavioral control on health behavior change, while the stages of site content evaluation and longer-term engagement of trust act as partial mediators; Relationships existed between TPB factors and trust stages. This study advances the understanding of health behavior change with regards to rational factors and trust stages and provides implications for stakeholders.



10:30am - 11:00am
ID: 227 / PS-11: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Surrogates’ health information seeking, Online health information, Information source, Information evaluation, Information sharing

Predicting Surrogates’ Health Information Seeking Behavior via Information Source and Information Evaluation

Yung-Sheng Chang, Yan Zhang, Jacek Gwizdka

The University of Texas at Austin, USA

This study investigates surrogates’ health information sharing behavior through information sources and information evaluation. A lab-based experiment was conducted. Twenty-five participants read five scenarios, each with three preselected webpages from a government, a commercial, and an online forum source. Participants had to decide whether to share the information with an imaginary friend of theirs and provide rationales (an indication of information evaluation). Content analysis and mixed effects logistic regression models were performed. Government websites were recommended for sharing the most, followed by commercial and online forum sources. Criteria predicting participants’ intention to share information were different for each information source. The content’s usefulness and trustworthiness were two criteria predicting participants’ intention to share commercial websites. Source’s trustworthiness and individual relevant criterion were two significant predictors for government sources. Source’s trustworthiness had negative effects on sharing information from online forums. 13.3% of the information evaluation involved using both positive and negative criteria.



11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 100 / PS-11: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Information seeking; information avoidance; cancer patients; interviews; selective exposure and avoidance

Avoiding Information During Serious Illness: Insights into the Information Behavior of Cancer Patients

Jesper Gabs Jensen, Emil Petersen, Tove Faber Frandsen

University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

Cancer patients seek information about their health and illness using many different approaches. Some prefer to seek intensively whereas other avoid seeking information. Over the course of the cancer continuum an individual may meet their needs using several different approaches. In this paper, we explore how avoidance can be an approach used as part of information seeking activities and not just as an alternative approach. Interviews with six current and former cancer patients were conducted and analyzed. We identify the different patterns of information seeking among the interviewees ranging from seeking intensively to avoiding information. Furthermore, we find that exposing yourself selectively to information as well as avoiding some information can be strategies to protect the information seeker from information the individual is not able to cope with. This study indicates that the information seeking approaches are overlapping.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmApplying Research in Industry: Methods, Theories, Approaches and How They Shape Practice
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Sandra Hirsh, San Jose State University, USA
Session Chair: Don Turnbull, Aqua M&A, USA
 
ID: 348 / [Single Presentation of ID 348]: 1
Industry Panel
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Research Methods
Keywords: industry

Sam Ladner1, Laurentia Romaniuk2, Christine Anderson3

1Workday, USA; 2Instacart, USA; 3The Trade Desk, USA

This panel invites industry leaders to discuss how they apply their research skills and experiences to industry work to address practical problems. Panelists will review and highlight their own observations on best practice approaches to doing practical research and identify how research shapes and informs their work. They will also discuss trends, challenges, and opportunities for collaboration between industry and academia.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmPaper Session 15: Infrastructure and Inequality
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Elliott Hauser, The University of Texas at Austin, USA
 
4:00pm - 4:30pm
ID: 233 / PS-15: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: peer review, publishing, discrimination

Ethnic Disparities in Publishing in Top Scientific Journals

Hao Peng1, Karim Lakhani2, Misha Teplitskiy1

1University of Michigan, USA; 2Harvard University, USA

Publishing in top journals is crucial for academic careers, but not all authors are equally successful in getting their papers accepted. Here, we examine ethnic disparities in publishing success using the peer review data of 31,779 manuscripts submitted between 2013-2018 to two biology journals, one field-leading (Journal A) and one middle-tier (Journal B). The data include accepted and rejected submissions, their peer reviews and citation trajectories, and author ethnicities determined via a name-based classifier. We find that overall, authors with minority-ethnicity names had significantly lower acceptance rates at both journals than those with British-origin names. However, for most ethnicities, these disparities are reduced or disappear when accounting for post-publication citation impact. Nevertheless, at Journal A, for a given level of future impact and other paper characteristics, editors were (i) less likely to send East Asian-authored papers out for peer review, and after receiving reviews, for a given level of peer reviewer enthusiasm (ii) less likely to ultimately accept them. In contrast to editors, Journal A’s peer reviewers gave recommendations that were similar across all ethnic groups. As submissions to top journals increasingly come from all over the globe, these findings signal the need to better understand editors’ decision-making.



4:30pm - 5:00pm
ID: 203 / PS-15: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Knowledge infrastructures; homelessness; VI-SPDAT; infrastructural justice; critical infrastructure studies

Just Infrastructure? Field Research on a Standardized Assessment Tool for a Continuum of Care for People Experiencing Homelessness

Stephen Slota1, Kenneth Fleischmann1, Sherri Greenberg1, Michelle Surka1, Keyanna Evans1, James Snow2, Sarah Rodriguez3, Tara Zimmerman1

1The University of Texas at Austin, USA; 2City of Austin: Public Works Department, USA; 3City of Austin: Office of Design and Delivery, USA

As community-oriented programs move from intervention to infrastructure, questions of just and equitable access to that infrastructure both arise and become more consequential to those served. However, extant tools are general in scope, often undertested, and inconsistently linked with positive outcomes for served communities and service providers. We explore the dynamics and implications of a key tool within this infrastructure intended to enable portable collaboration across organizations serving those who are experiencing homelessness: the VI-SPDAT (Vulnerability Index - Service Prioritization Decision Assistance Tool). This tool, while providing a means of coordinated assessment, must itself be negotiated according to the values, data concerns, and goals of the agencies and service providers who make use of it. This paper reports findings from 29 interviews with individuals working in nonprofits, charities, and government agencies that provide services or resources to people experiencing homelessness within the City of Austin’s Continuum of Care. The life-and-death stakes of the VI-SPDAT, which is designed to prioritize access to services based in part on a prediction of potential for premature mortality, drive home the need for equitable and just infrastructure.



5:00pm - 5:30pm
ID: 241 / PS-15: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Digital inequality; COVID-19 pandemic; K-12 education; crisis and critical informatics; e-learning technology

Social and Digital Inequality as Factors in K-12 Emergency Remote Teaching and Learning in the Pandemic of 2020: Educator Perspectives

Rebecca Reynolds, Julie Aromi, Catherine McGowan, Britt Paris

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, USA

The rapid deployment of emergency remote teaching in the pandemic presents sweeping societal-level information systems phenomena worthy of scholarly inquiry. This paper reports findings from teacher interviews conducted with K-12 public school teachers, exploring how digital access and use gaps in communities reflect social inequalities as schools become swept up into e-learning technology expansion trends propelled by district and state imperatives. Results show persistence of home and school level digital affordance gaps as hindrances to pandemic pedagogy. We build upon crisis and critical informatics literature considering how theories in socio-technical systems research can inform these understandings, providing insights into the mutually reflecting and reinforcing role of digital inequality and social inequality, via the educative processes expected of public education in democratic societies, if current trends hold. Our work demonstrates some of the ways in which digital inequality gaps may play a further magnifying role of societal division through expanding edtech deployment in K-12 grades.

 

Date: Tuesday, 02/Nov/2021
9:00am - 10:30amPaper Session 17: Science of Science
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Chris Cunningham, North Carolina Central University, USA
 
9:00am - 9:15am
ID: 164 / PS-17: 1
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Interdisciplinarity; Disparity; Node2Vec; Citation analysis; Scholarly communication

Measurement of Interdisciplinarity: Quantifying Distance-Based Disparity Using Node2vec

Hongyu Zhou, Raf Guns, Tim Engels

University of Antwerp, Belgium

When quantifying the level of interdisciplinarity for scientific research, most established indicators employ a three-element diversity framework, namely variety, balance, and disparity, each of which captures a distinct but insufficient element. Among three, disparity, i.e. how different (dissimilar) the categories within a system are, is the most challenging one due to its calculation cost and conceptual ambiguity. The discriminative power for disparity is found to be weakened in more fine-grained science classification schemes. To address this issue, this paper proposes a new method for quantifying disparity by applying Node2vec on the discipline citation network and retrieving distance between disciplines using embeddings vectors. Compared to cosine-based dissimilarity for disparity, our proposed method exhibited broader distribution and less skewness for disparity values, which could potentially lead to higher discriminative power of interdisciplinarity. A case study for Linguistics is also conducted to show the capability of detecting variations in disparity of the proposed method.



9:15am - 9:45am
ID: 277 / PS-17: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Interdisciplinary collaboration, Disruption, Regression analysis

Is Interdisciplinary Collaboration Research More Disruptive Than Monodisciplinary Research?

Xin Liu1, Yi Bu2, Ming Li1, Jiang Li1

1Nanjing University, People's Republic of China; 2Peking University, People's Republic of China

As an important pattern of scientific research, interdisciplinary collaboration is universally encouraged by science and technology policy makers. However, it remains a question whether interdisciplinary collaboration research is more disruptive than monodisciplinary research. To address this research question in this study, interdisciplinary collaboration is measured as whether the authors of a paper are from at least two disciplines, and the degree of "disruptive" is measured by the Disruption index proposed by Funk & Owen-Smith (2017). By using articles published in six journals from 1978 to 2019 in the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG) database, we constructed an OLS regression model with journal fixed effect and time fixed effect to analyze the influence of interdisciplinary collaboration on the Disruption values with different citation windows. The findings show that interdisciplinary collaboration research is less disruptive than monodisciplinary research.



9:45am - 10:00am
ID: 217 / PS-17: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Research Lineage, Citation Significance Detection, Feature Engineering, Machine Learning, Idea Propagation

A Step Towards Finding a Research Lineage Leveraging on Identification of Significant Citations

Tirthankar Ghosal, Muskaan Singh

Charles University, Czech Republic

Finding the lineage of a research topic is crucial for understanding the prior state of the art and advancing scientific displacement. The deluge of scholarly articles makes it difficult to locate the most relevant prior work and causes researchers to spend a considerable amount of time building up their literature list. Citations play a significant role in discovering relevant literature. However, not all citations are created equal. A majority of the citations that a paper receives are for providing contextual, and background information to the citing papers and are not central to the theme of those papers. However, some papers are pivotal to the citing paper and inspire or stem up the research in the citing paper. Hence the nature of citation the former receives from the later is significant. In this work in progress paper, we discuss our preliminary idea towards establishing a lineage for a given research via identifying significant citations. We hypothesize that such an automated system can facilitate relevant literature discovery and help identify knowledge flow for at least a certain category of papers. The distal goal of this work is to identify the real impact of research work or a facility beyond direct citation counts.



10:00am - 10:30am
ID: 264 / PS-17: 4
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: double-blind peer review, prestige bias, choice architecture

Does Double-Blind Peer Review Reduce Bias? Evidence from a Top Computer Science Conference

Mengyi Sun, Jainabou Dafna, Misha Teplitskiy

University of Michigan, USA

Peer review is essential for advancing scientific research, but there are long-standing concerns that reviewers are biased by authors' prestige or other characteristics. Double-blind peer review has been proposed as a way to reduce reviewer bias, but the evidence for its effectiveness is limited and mixed. Here, we examine the effects of double-blind peer review by analyzing the peer review files of 5027 papers submitted to a top computer science conference that changed its reviewing format from single- to double-blind in 2018. We find that after switching to double-blind review, the scores given to the most prestigious authors significantly decreased. However, because many of these papers were above the threshold for acceptance, the change did not affect paper acceptance significantly. The inter-reviewer disagreement increased significantly in the double-blind format. Papers rejected in the single-blind format are cited more than those rejected under double-blind, suggesting that double-blind review better excludes poorer quality papers. Lastly, an apparently unrelated change in the rating scale from 10 to 4 points likely reduced prestige bias significantly such that papers’ acceptance was affected. These results support the effectiveness of double-blind review in reducing biases, while opening new research directions on the impact of peer review formats.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmGrowing the iFederation: Leveraging the ASIS&T, ALISE, and the iSchools Collaboration to Advance Information Science
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 342 / [Single Presentation of ID 342]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: ifederation, ALISE, ischool

Brian Detlor1, Sandra Hirsh2, Michael Seadle3

1McMaster University, Canada; 2San Jose State University, USA; 3iSchools Organization, Inc.

The iFederation is a joint initiative between ASIS&T, ALISE, and the iSchools to mutually cooperate and promote information science and related disciplines. During this panel session, each of the three partner organizations within the iFederation will describe their own association’s strategic directions and their views on how they envision themselves mutually cooperating and promoting information science with the other two iFederation associations. The panel will start with a quick overview of the current Memorandum of Understanding signed between the three founding iFederation associations, followed by a short overview of each association’s strategic plans and ideas for iFederation collaborations. This will be followed by a lengthy discussion with audience attendees in regards to their perspectives on how best to move the iFederation forward in a way that is mutually beneficial to all.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmPaper Session 22: Engagement and Representation, Online and Offline
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Steven Hardin, Indiana State University, USA
 
2:00pm - 2:30pm
ID: 130 / PS-22: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: personal archiving, social media, gender

Revisiting and Hiding Posts: Personal Archiving on Facebook

Benedict Olgado1,2, Ces Archae Buenavista1, Beatrice Tan1

1University of the Philippines, Philippines; 2University of California, Irvine, USA

Our exploratory quantitative research show that users consider Facebook as a personal archive even if they perceive the platform to be only moderately useful or stable. In this personal archive, users are likely to revisit old posts but are unlikely to repost them. They are likely to hide old posts but are unlikely to edit them. Unlike previous studies that assert gender differences on social media activities, we found that there are no statistically significant differences between users who self-identify as female and those who self-identify as male when it comes to revisiting, reposting, editing, or deleting old posts. Self-identifying females, however, were more likely to hide posts than males. Our study points to extending how we think of and practice archiving in personal ways on social media platforms, acknowledging that a new generation of users may possibly conceive of archiving differently given the sociotechnical systems they engage with and the nature of recordmaking practices they employ.



2:30pm - 3:00pm
ID: 163 / PS-22: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Information practices, Knowledge Wanghong, Online celebrity, Perceived attractiveness, Self-branding

Exploring the Perceived Attractiveness of Online Celebrities Who Sell Knowledge: A Self-Branding Perspective

Xiaoyu Chen, Alton Y.K. Chua

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Given the limited understanding of the attractiveness among online celebrities, this study explores the perceived attractiveness of “Knowledge Wanghong,” an emerging class of online celebrities who sell knowledge products in China. Drawing on the self-branding perspective, which argues that individuals may construct and manage their distinctive online image deliberately through various information practices, as the theoretical lens, we attempt to answer two questions: (1) What are the antecedents of the perceived attractiveness of Knowledge Wanghong? (2) How do Knowledge Wanghong make themselves attractive to users? From semi-structured interviews with 28 Knowledge Wanghong, we derive two findings. First, the antecedents of the perceived attractiveness include perceived professionalism, perceived familiarity, and perceived intimacy. Second, Knowledge Wanghong make themselves appealing to users in two ways: (1) they disclose personal and professional information to users; (2) they employ multiple approaches to interacting with users. This study sheds light on the perceived attractiveness of Knowledge Wanghong in terms of the antecedents and how it is achieved. Also, it provides a novel reference point for discussing the information practices of online celebrities in a global context.



3:00pm - 3:30pm
ID: 105 / PS-22: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: youth civic engagement; social network; digital citizenship; weak tie theory

Social Connections Matter: Online and Offline Civic Engagement Among College Students

Shihui Feng, Mengqian Li, Ola Erstad

University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

This research examines civic engagement from both online and offline perspectives using 371 samples collected from two universities in China. We aimed to explore the effects of college students’ social connections on their online and offline civic engagement using partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). We found that weak ties in college students’ civic discussion networks play a significant role in affecting both online and offline civic engagement. Additionally, students’ characteristics, such as academic year, leadership role, and party membership, are associated with offline civic engagement, but not with online civic engagement. Political efficacy was also found to be a significant factor affecting both online and offline civic engagement. This study examines the weak tie theory in the context of online and offline civic engagement, sheds light on underlying principles for engaging young adults in civic life in the digital era, and advocates the importance of developing a blended approach for engaging college students in civic engagement in both online and offline settings.