Conference Agenda (All times are shown in Mountain Daylight Time)

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
Date: Friday, 29/Oct/2021
9:00am - 5:00pmSocial Media Research, Challenges, and Opportunities (SIG-SM)
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 147 / [Single Presentation of ID 147]: 1
Workshops
8 hours
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Social Media; Misinformation; Disinformation; Fake News; Proposal Development

Amir Karami1, Loni Hagen2, Catherine Dumas3, Aylin Ilhan4, Mohammad Hossein Jarrahi5, Tara Zimmerman6, Avery Holton7, Jana Diesner8, Javed Mostafa5, Chirag Shah9, Vivek Singh10

1University of South Carolina, USA; 2University of South Florida, USA; 3Simmons University, USA; 4Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany; 5University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA; 6University of North Texas, USA; 7University of Utah, USA; 8University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA; 9University of Washington, WA; 10Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, USA

This full-day workshop aims to promote discussion and disciplinary convergence on the topic of social media research focusing on issues related to pandemic, election, mis/disinformation, and social bots. Social media has become a mainstream channel of communication where users share and exchange information. The ASIST community is uniquely situated in this landscape as a community of researchers and educators who study different issues using social media data. This workshop aims to: 1) highlight current social media research opportunities and challenges, 2) identify and connect social media researchers, 3) introduce dis/misinformation issues in social media, and 4) provide practical guides to investigators, enhancing their understanding of the grant development process and their abilities to write a successful external grant proposal. This workshop brings together a group of social media researchers and senior faculty who developed successful external proposals to share their research and experiences.

 

Date: Saturday, 30/Oct/2021
8:00am - 12:00pm21st Annual Research Symposium at ASIST 2021: Methods for Real-World Impact with Information Behavior Research (SIG-USE)
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 209 / [Single Presentation of ID 209]: 1
Workshops
4 hours
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Research Methods
Keywords: information behavior, information practices, research methodology

Sarah Barriage1, Leslie Thomson2

1University of Kentucky, USA; 2University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA

The 21st Annual SIG-USE Research Symposium focuses on the theme of methods for investigating and making real-world impact with human information behavior and practices research. This symposium is an opportunity for researchers, students, faculty, and information professionals who are interested in information behavior and practices to discuss the metatheories, methodological approaches, research methods, and techniques that shape human information behavior and practices research, and that translate to positive differences in the world. The symposium will feature an informative panel presentation, as well as several paper and poster presentations, in order to explore different methodological and methods-related developments and challenges in information behavior and practices research. The symposium will also offer a Q&A session for authors who are interested in submitting their works to the upcoming Library and Information Science Research special issue on information behavior and information practices methods.

 
1:00pm - 5:00pmDoctoral Colloquium
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott

Date: Sunday, 31/Oct/2021
11:00am - 12:30pmPaper Session 01: Information Production and Flow
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Deanna Morrow Hall, Corporate Information Resources, Inc., USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

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11:00am - 11:30am
ID: 259 / PS-01: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Science studies, History of Information Science, Scientific Facts, Memory Practices

What is the Thermal Conductivity of Copper? The Production of a Fact Through Scientific Forgetting

Elliott Hauser

The University of Texas at Austin, USA

What is the thermal conductivity of copper? This straightforward question leads to a fascinating instance of the production of scientific facts through documentation practices. Ho, Powell and Liley’s 1974 The Thermal Conductivity of the Elements: A Comprehensive Review is examined as an artifact of scientific reference data production, and its answer to the initial question is traced to modern-day search engine results. A short history of the Center that produced the book and some initial research into its authors is provided.

Kuhn’s concepts of normal science and normic lexical structures are utilized to clarify the Comprehensive Review’s functioning within the broader scientific fields in which it is utilized. Bowker’s concepts of memory practices and the jussive Archive help identify the forgetting embedded in the production of reference data, producing what Star called global certainty. Far from impugning the internal validity of these scientific facts, this forgetting is shown to be licensed by scientific rigor.

This paper presents a novel historically informed investigation of how documentation practices produce scientific facts, and connect these activities to modern-day knowledge graph information retrieval. The theoretical analyses provided show how scientifically licensed forgetting is a key mechanism of fact production, what Hayles termed constrained constructivism.



11:30am - 11:45am
ID: 160 / PS-01: 2
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Theory
Keywords: Information Practices, Foundations of Information Science; Power/knowledge, Information Theory

Reconciling Authority and Agency Through Information Practices Research

Michael Olsson

University of the Philippines, Philippines

Authority and Agency have been central concepts in information science since its beginnings in 19th century documentalism. This paper begins with a brief historical overview of how these concepts have been constructed in the traditional and user-centred paradigms. It will then explore how an information practices perspective affords the possibility of seeing authority and agency not as oppositional but rather as synergistic: two sides of the same theoretical coin. This exploration will be contextualised by examples drawn from the author’s own research over more than two decades across a range of studies. This body of research includes studies of academic, artistic and serious leisure communities.



11:45am - 12:15pm
ID: 202 / PS-01: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: manufacturing enterprises, information flow, innovation value chain, multi-agent simulation

Research on Information Flow Mechanism of Manufacturing Enterprises from the Perspective of Innovation Value Chain

Xiudan Yang, Xiaoying Qi

Hebei University, People's Republic of China

In order to reflect the interactions, flow-path differences and nonlinear laws among manufacturing enterprises’ innovation units and to reveal relations between information-flowing efficiency and innovation capabilities, the paper divides innovation activities of manufacturing enterprises into three phases, such as information acquisition, information transformation and information value addition based on the theory of innovation value chain, and puts forward a mathematical model of information absorption and transformation to ultimately reveal the mechanisms for information flow across inside and outside units. Further, the paper takes a non-linear function for absorptive capacity based on level of experiential knowledge, continuous R&D intensity, and agent relation strength to quantify the information absorption and transformation process and takes index of innovation information amount and cumulative information amount to calculate innovation abilities and measure information value addition. Finally, the paper uses simulation tool to analyze the influencing factors of information absorption and transformation optimization.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmRacial Attacks during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Politicizing an Epidemic Crisis on Longstanding Racism and Misinformation, Disinformation, and Misconception
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 284 / [Single Presentation of ID 284]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: misinformation; disinformation; COVID-19; xenophobia; racism

Miyoung Chong1, Thomas Froehlich2, Kai Shu3

1University of Virginia, USA; 2Kent State University, USA; 3Illinois Institute of Technology, USA

The COVID-19 pandemic crisis has affected everyone’s life on a daily basis for more than a year. However, some racial groups have experienced a double pandemic, that of COVID-19 and racist attacks incorrectly tied to the pandemic. Harassment and physical intimidation were the source of many anti-Asian attacks. The number of unarmed black people assaulted and killed by police almost tripled during 2020 when compared 2019. In this panel, we will attempt to analyze recent racial attacks in terms of malinformation, such as misinformation, disinformation, or shallow, historical stereotypes of ethnic minorities as another layer of the pandemic originating with racism or inflamed grievances. The panelists will discuss the proposed topic drawing from each panelist’s expertise and an interactive discussion with the audience will follow after each panelist’s presentation. Members and attendees at ASIS&T who have an interest in the spread of dis- and misinformation via social media and politicizing the pandemic crisis will find our topics useful to their research.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmWelcome to Information Science (SIG-HFIS)
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 222 / [Single Presentation of ID 222]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Information science, intellectual history, disciplinary identity(s), indigenous ways of knowing

Jenna Hartel1, Marcia Bates2, Vishma Bhattarai3, LaVerne Gray4, Patrick Keilty1, Sandy Littletree5

1University of Toronto, Canada; 2University of California, Los Angeles, USA; 3Enoch Pratt Free Library, USA; 4Syracuse University, USA; 5University of Washington, ISA

This panel engages conference attendees in the history and foundations of information science and provides an opportunity to reflect upon our field’s current and future identity(s). It enacts the following scenario: At an orientation event for an information science program a spokesperson gives incoming students a brief address on the theme, “Welcome to information science.” Six imaginative but authentic versions of that talk are offered here. To showcase the variety of approaches to information science across the past century, each disquisition is inspired by the work of one luminary, namely: Paul Otlet, S. R. Ranganathan, Jesse H. Shera, Elfreda Chatman, and Marcia J. Bates. In an effort to encourage a more spacious information science, an indigenous perspective on ways of knowing is also included. Attendees to this session will time-travel across almost 100 years of information science history and ultimately rest in the reality of a multi-perspective discipline.

 

Date: Monday, 01/Nov/2021
8:00am - 9:30amCollaborative Efforts and Success Story of an Open-Learning Program: Partnership Growth of the Research Data Management Librarian Academy (RDMLA)
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 216 / [Single Presentation of ID 216]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Research Data Management Librarian Academy; collaboration and partnership growth; open learning and diverse learner needs; education equity; global RDM community of practice

Rong Tang1, Ceilyn Boyd2, Andrew Creamer4, Adam Kriesberg1, Elaine Martin3, Rebecca Morin5, Zhan Hu1, Ashley Thomas3

1Simmons University, USA; 2Harvard University, USA; 3Harvard Medical School, USA; 4Brown University, USA; 5Tufts University, USA

Launched in October 2019, the Research Data Management Librarian Academy (RDMLA) addresses the learning gaps in RDM training. Through a unique partnership among practicing librarians, LIS faculty, and industry, the RDMLA has produced a dynamic open learning experience, highlighting the benefits of collaboration and skill-sharing. This collaboration’s success lies in how the project leveraged each partner’s strengths and experience while centering on the shared purpose, dedication to equitable learning, and mutual respect among the team members. This panel focuses on the collaborative efforts undertaken by the RDMLA leadership and instructors to develop an open-access professional development education program. Five panelists will share their experience working on this large collaborative project from varying perspectives, the lessons learned while developing their content, the challenges they encountered, and their understanding of the benefits of such a collaborative endeavor in producing free, open-access learning to foster a community of practice in RDM.

 
10:00am - 11:30amExpanding Our Conceptions of Embodied and Affective Information Interactions with Queer Theory
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 210 / [Single Presentation of ID 210]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Theory
Keywords: embodiment; affect; queer; information interactions; theory

Diana Floegel1, Travis Wagner2, Daniel Delmonaco3, B.M. Watson4

1Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, USA; 2University of South Carolina, USA; 3University of Michigan, USA; 4University of British Columbia, Canada

Embodiment and affect are understudied in information science work to date. Literature that engages with embodied information interactions typically focuses on physical bodies, while work on affect largely centers people’s emotional experiences in formal knowledge institutions like libraries. Room therefore exists to grow in our understanding of embodiment and affect, particularly in terms of theorizing how bodies and feelings factor into a wide range of information experiences from non-dominant standpoints. This panel centers queer experiences and queer theory in order to expand conceptions of and connections between embodied and affective dimensions of information interactions. Panelists will present a range of research that examines queer people’s practices and experiences with information in historical, archival, creative, and health-related domains. Bodies and emotions are essential components of critical queer theoretical perspectives, meaning that scholarship which centers queerness and its intersections with constructs like race has great potential to expand many branches of information science further beyond their normative bents. In concert, topics discussed should spark conversation among attendees about the theoretical and practical benefits of deeply studying embodiment and affect and further utilizing critical theory in multiple domains within the information science discipline.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmData Discovery and Reuse in Data Service Practices: A Global Perspective
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 144 / [Single Presentation of ID 144]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Data discovery; Research data management; Data repositories; User interfaces

Ying-Hsang Liu1, Hsin-liang {Oliver} Chen2, Makoto Kato3, Mingfang Wu4, Kathleen Gregory5,6,7

1University of Southern Denmark, Denmark; 2Missouri University of Science and Technology, USA; 3University of Tsukuba, Japan; 4Australian Research Data Commons, Australia; 5University of Ottawa, Canada; 6Scholarly Communications Lab, Ottawa/Vancouver, Canada; 7Data Archiving and Networked Services, Netherlands

The proposed panel will address the issues of the discovery and reuse of publicly available data on the web in the context of data service practices from a global perspective. Thousands of data discovery services have appeared around the world since the promotion of ‘open science’, reproducible research, and the FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) data principles in the research sector. However, there is also increasing demand for transparency of search algorithms, and in the design, development, evaluation, and deployment of current data search services; this requires a better understanding of how users approach data discovery and interact with data in search settings. From a global perspective, we will identify and discuss the specific system design issues in data discovery and reuse, drawing on our organization of the NTCIR (NII Testbeds and Community for Information access Research) project of Data Search track, the design and evaluation of the data discovery service of the Australian Research Data Commons (ARDC), and studies examining researchers’ practices of data discovery and reuse.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmPaper Session 14: User Engagement and Experience
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Janette Klein, University of North Texas, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
4:00pm - 4:15pm
ID: 117 / PS-14: 1
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Social media image, User engagement, Machine learning, Regression analysis

Image Position and Layout Effects on User Engagement of Multi-Image Tweets

Xiaoyue Ma, Xiao Meng

Xi'an Jiaotong University, People's Republic of China

Current researches paid less attention to the image position and layout of tweets containing multiple images. Inspired by the research on user cognition, this study explored the impact of image position and layout on user engagement. The XGBoost model trained on single-image tweet data was used to predict the "user engagement potential" of a single image in multi-image tweets. Then, the influence of image position and layout on user engagement was analyzed through correlation analysis and OLS regression. It was found that the right position was more important in tweets with less than or equal to 4 images, and the position effects became symmetric with image adding. Layouts with 6 and 4 images had positive effects on user engagement, while layouts with 7 and 9 or more images had negative effects. This study provides insights into user engagement with social media images and may help improve interaction.



4:15pm - 4:45pm
ID: 193 / PS-14: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Human-computer interaction, subjective workload, gaze fixation, user-interface design, systematic review

A Mixed-Method Usability Study on User Experience with Systematic Review Software

Manhua Wang1,2, Selina Sharmin1, Mengqian Wang1, Fei Yu1

1University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA; 2Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, USA

Systematic reviews are widely used in evidence-based medicine. Conducting a systematic review requires intensive mental efforts, especially during the study screening process. This challenge has motivated the development of intelligent software. This study examined and compared the performance, workload, and user experience of two systematic review tools – Colandr with AI features and Covidence without AI features by conducting a mixed-method usability study. The results showed that, compared with Covidence, Colandr helped reviewers with higher precision in citation screening. However, the user experience with Colandr was not optimal due to problems in its user interface design. Therefore, we suggest that the design and development of AI-enabled SR software emphasize the usability of the interface and apply user-centered design principles.



4:45pm - 5:15pm
ID: 111 / PS-14: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Chinese painting and calligraphy, Digital archives search system, Information search process, Meaning making process, Search as learning

Learning Outcomes During Information Search in Digital Archives

I-Chin Wu1, Pertti Vakkari2, Bo-Xian Huang1

1National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan; 2Tampere University, Finland

A museum’s digital archive system gathers information about cultural heritage and makes it accessible to the public. In this study we clarify the extent to which search behaviors reflect task outcome and foster users’ knowledge of painting and calligraphy. Ten users participated in this evaluation of the Digital Archives of Chinese Painting and Calligraphy Search System (DA-PCSS) of the National Palace Museum in Taiwan. Participants’ search activities and interactions with the DA-PCSS were recorded in two simulated tasks. The results show that participants who received high scores for their essays on the tasks formulated precise queries: instead of general terms they used precise expressions describing features in paintings and calligraphy. In addition, they were able to seek out sources to explore the topics. For such participants, a meaning-making process seems to have occurred during the search process. Our results suggest that the criteria for learning at various stages of search suggested by Vakkari (2016) seem to validly reflect the quality of the search outcomes. In all, the results elucidate how the evaluated system supports users as they search for target items, as well as how learning occurs during the search process and in turn influences task outcomes.

 

Date: Tuesday, 02/Nov/2021
9:00am - 10:30amPaper Session 16: Co-Design and Participatory Design
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Elizabeth Tague Frakes, University of Utah, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
9:00am - 9:30am
ID: 156 / PS-16: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: co-design; participatory design; health information; eHealth; older adults

Designing eHealth Tutorials with and for Older Adults

Nathan Davis1, Kristina Shiroma1, Bo Xie1, Tom Yeh2, Xu Han2, Atami De Main1

1The University of Texas at Austin, USA; 2University of Colorado Boulder, USA

Older adults may be excluded from using digital health technologies due to limited eHealth literacy. Research is much needed to decrease disparities in eHealth literacy and increase the inclusiveness of such technologies. Integrating the preferences and expertise of older adults is key to age-appropriate design of eHealth tutorials. This study explores how participatory design (PD) techniques can be adapted to include older adults in the design of an eHealth tutorial. We worked with 9 older adults (aged 64 and 82) as co-designers and conducted PD sessions over 11 weeks in a senior center’s computer lab. Using thematic analysis, we identified 7 themes around the design of eHealth tutorials for older adults. We also identified successes and challenges in PD with older adults, along with benefits of partnering with senior centers. Our findings have implications for both the design of eHealth tutorials for older adults and for PD with older adults.



9:30am - 10:00am
ID: 149 / PS-16: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Research Methods
Keywords: Participatory Design, Participatory Action Research, Co-design, Children and Youth, Literature review

The Meaning of “Participation” in Co-Design with Children and Youth: Relationships, Roles, and Interactions

Leanne Bowler, Karen Wang, Irene Lopatovska, Mark Rosin

Pratt Institute, USA

The paper examines the concept of participation in co-design practices with children and youth. Rooted in Participatory Design and Participatory Action Research frameworks, the paper draws from multi-disciplinary literature to survey existing definitions of the relationships, roles, and types of human interactions in participatory co-design. The paper advocates for the active role of children and youth in the co-design process and presents models of youth participation. The paper highlights the importance of understanding and clearly communicating various degrees of participation, with the ultimate goal of empowering youth and involving them in brainstorming, planning, decision-making, and interpretation stages of the design process. We introduce the concept of conscious co-design and the need to reflect on the design process at a meta level in Participatory Design and Participatory Action Research.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmPaper Session 19: Information Seeking and Information Search
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Steven Hardin, Indiana State University, USA
 
11:00am - 11:30am
ID: 123 / PS-19: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Information needs, social science, research data, user study

Genuine Information Needs of Social Scientists Looking for Data

Andrea Papenmeier1, Thomas Krämer1, Tanja Friedrich2, Daniel Hienert1, Dagmar Kern1

1GESIS Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany; 2German Aerospace Center, Germany

Publishing research data is widely expected to increase its reuse and to inspire new research. In the social sciences, data from surveys, interviews, polls, and statistics are primary resources for research. There is a long tradition to collect and offer research data in data archives and online repositories. Researchers use these systems to identify data relevant to their research. However, especially in data search, users’ complex information needs seem to collide with the capabilities of data search systems. The search capabilities, in turn, depend to a high degree upon the metadata schemes used to describe the data. In this research, we conducted an online survey with 72 social science researchers who expressed their individual information needs for research data like they would do when asking a colleague for help. We analyzed these information needs and attributed their different components to the categories: topic, metadata, and intention. We compared these categories and their content to existing metadata models of research data and the search and filter opportunities offered in existing data search systems. We found a mismatch between what users have as a requirement for their data and what is offered on metadata level and search system possibilities.



11:30am - 12:00pm
ID: 183 / PS-19: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Conversational Search Systems, Information-seeking Dialogues, Discourse, Spoken Search, Voice-based Personal Assistants

“Can You Search for Me?” Understanding and Improving User-System Dialogues for Complex Search Tasks

Souvick Ghosh

San José State University, USA

Most voice-based personal assistants are suitable for simple tasks which are not conversational but single-turn question-answering. To address this limitation, we investigate the dialogue capabilities of commercial conversational systems and compare them to the standards expected by the users. We designed a set of moderately complex search tasks and used two popular personal assistants to evaluate the user-system interaction. A laboratory-based user study was conducted with twenty-five users and seventy-five search sessions to collect user-system conversational dialogues (for three search tasks). Next, we show that using a set of simple rules, which could be implemented in the immediate future, it is possible to improve the users’ interaction experience and make the system more anthropomorphic. Using a conceptual prototype where a human (Wizard) played the role of the system (unknowing to the users), we demonstrate the efficacy of the guidelines and provide design recommendations for future conversational search systems.



12:00pm - 12:30pm
ID: 258 / PS-19: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Satisfaction · fMRI · Information Need · Neural Correlates · Search Process.

Neural Correlates of Realisation of Satisfaction in a Successful Search Process

Sakrapee Paisalnan1, Yashar Moshfeghi2, Frank Pollick1

1University of Glasgow, UK; 2University of Strathclyde, UK

In a search process, searchers review documents to gather information relevant to their information need (IN). During this process, searchers may experience the satisfaction of their IN, indicating they have gathered adequate relevant information to answer their need. This complex concept of satisfaction is the ultimate goal of search systems. Most studies in Information Retrieval have been attempted to understand how searchers’ needs are satisfied based on behavioural observation. However, the psychophysiological manifestation during the moment of satisfaction still remains unclear. Here, we use functional Magnetic Resonance (fMRI) to investigate which brain regions are involved during the moment of satisfaction. Twenty-six participants participated in the experiment, designed to represent a search process while being scanned. Our result shows the human brain regions involved during the moment of satisfaction. These findings provide an important step in unravelling the concept of satisfaction in a search process.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmPaper Session 21: Information Policy
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Naresh Kumar Agarwal, Simmons University, USA
 
2:00pm - 2:30pm
ID: 267 / PS-21: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: information access, information policy, copyright, libraries, fair use/fair dealing

Controlled Digital Lending

Chad Currier, Alissa Centivany

University of Western Ontario, Canada

Libraries and library consortia are adopting controlled digital lending (CDL) as a strategy, accelerated by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, to facilitate equitable access to print collections. While advocates of CDL contend that digitize-and-lend practices reflect an incremental, technology-assisted adjustment to traditional library circulation, lending, and resource-sharing practices, opponents of CDL in the United States and Canada argue that the practice contravenes well-established copyright protections. This paper discusses current controversies surrounding CDL, its potential promise and perils, and concludes that a reasonable, equitable, and forward-looking application of copyright laws ought to insulate libraries and library consortia from exposure to liability for engaging in CDL.



2:30pm - 3:00pm
ID: 109 / PS-21: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Privacy and Ethics
Keywords: Data ethics, privacy, CiteSpace, mapping knowledge domains, co-citation analysis

Analysis of Mapping Knowledge Domains for Privacy Issues in Data Ethics Research

Yuan Gao, Jianping He

Shenzhen University, People's Republic of China

This paper is based on the Web of Science database and takes advantage of CiteSpace, a scientometric software, to conduct visualization analyses. It is found that privacy issues in data ethics have reached the research peak in the past two years. The current global research in this field is characterized by three different periods and multidisciplinary perspectives. The hotspots of this field are relatively concentrated and gradually deepened. Besides, the research in this field has moved from the theoretical stage to the practical application stage. This paper attempts to present the scientific knowledge structure, patterns and distribution of privacy issues in data ethics, exploring the global frontier hotspots, providing inspiration and experience for Chinese academic research and industry practice in data ethics.



3:00pm - 3:30pm
ID: 126 / PS-21: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Privacy and Ethics
Keywords: information policy, 9/11, Trump, COVID-19, policy-making processes

Ecstasy and Entropy: Information Policy in a Punctuated System

Sandra Braman

Texas A&M University, USA

Three punctuations of US information policy in the 21st century, caused by 9/11, Trump, and COVID-19, have wrought such change that the domain is currently ecstatic and entropic. This paper introduces the three punctuations, discusses how punctuations affect policy-making in complex adaptive systems, and reviews what it means for policy and policy-making processes to be ecstatic and entropic. The paper than examines manifestations of these characteristics of contemporary information policy in theories, principles, issue areas, regulatory subjects, and policy-making processes.