Conference Agenda (All times are shown in Mountain Daylight Time)

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Date: Sunday, 31/Oct/2021
7:30am - 8:30amNew Leaders Coffee
Location: Snowbird, 2nd Floor, Marriott
7:30am - 8:45amSIG Cabinet Meeting
Location: Salon A, Lobby Level, Marriott
7:30am - 5:00pmSpeaker Ready Room
Location: Park City, 2nd Floor, Marriott
7:30am - 6:00pmRegistration
Location: Ballroom B Foyer, Lobby Level, Marriott
8:00am - 9:00amContinental Breakfast & Coffee
Location: Salons D-E, Lobby Level, Marriott
8:00am - 5:00pmPlacement Service
Location: Alta, 2nd Floor, Marriott
8:00am - 5:00pmPlacement Service
Location: Canyons, 2nd Floor, Marriott
9:00am - 10:30amOpening Plenary Keynote by Professor Luciano Floridi: "Semantic Capital: What It Is and Why It Matters"
Location: Salons D-E, Lobby Level, Marriott

Luciano Floridi is Professor of Philosophy and Ethics of Information at the University of Oxford, where he is Director of the OII Digital Ethics Lab. He is a world-renowned expert on digital ethics, the ethics of AI, the philosophy of information, and the philosophy of technology. He has published more than 300 works, translated into many languages. He is deeply engaged with policy initiatives on the socio-ethical value and implications of digital technologies and their applications, and collaborates closely on these topics with many governments and companies worldwide.

10:30am - 11:00amCoffee Break
Location: Ballroom Prefunction, Lobby Level, Marriott
10:30am - 4:00pmExhibits
Location: Ballroom Prefunction, Lobby Level, Marriott
11:00am - 12:30pmCommunity Resilience Through Diversity (European Chapter)
Location: Salon A, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 207 / [Single Presentation of ID 207]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Community; Diversity; Europe; Pivot; Resilience

Crystal Fulton1, Isto Huvila2, Olívia Pestana3, Anna Maria Tammaro4, Ying-Hsang Liu5, Sümeyye Akça6

1Uppsala University, Sweden; 2Åbo Akademi University, Finland; 3University of Porto, Portugal; 4University of Parma, Italy; 5University of Southern Denmark, Denmark; 6Hacettepe University, Turkey

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought about a pivot in people's practice of their daily life and work, in particular a pivot towards virtual living and working. Sponsored by the ASIS&T European Chapter, this panel discusses the diverse ways in which this has affected different communities within Europe, bearing in mind the varying languages, economic and political situations, and library & information structures within different European countries. Following on from presentations giving diverse perspectives from five European countries, we will ask session participants to reflect on the impact of the pivot on living and working in their own context, their coping mechanisms, and likely impact on the future.

Fulton-Community Resilience Through Diversity-207.docx
 
11:00am - 12:30pmPaper Session 01: Information Production and Flow
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Deanna Morrow Hall, Corporate Information Resources, Inc., USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

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11:00am - 11:30am
ID: 259 / PS-01: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Science studies, History of Information Science, Scientific Facts, Memory Practices

What is the Thermal Conductivity of Copper? The Production of a Fact Through Scientific Forgetting

Elliott Hauser

The University of Texas at Austin, USA

What is the thermal conductivity of copper? This straightforward question leads to a fascinating instance of the production of scientific facts through documentation practices. Ho, Powell and Liley’s 1974 The Thermal Conductivity of the Elements: A Comprehensive Review is examined as an artifact of scientific reference data production, and its answer to the initial question is traced to modern-day search engine results. A short history of the Center that produced the book and some initial research into its authors is provided.

Kuhn’s concepts of normal science and normic lexical structures are utilized to clarify the Comprehensive Review’s functioning within the broader scientific fields in which it is utilized. Bowker’s concepts of memory practices and the jussive Archive help identify the forgetting embedded in the production of reference data, producing what Star called global certainty. Far from impugning the internal validity of these scientific facts, this forgetting is shown to be licensed by scientific rigor.

This paper presents a novel historically informed investigation of how documentation practices produce scientific facts, and connect these activities to modern-day knowledge graph information retrieval. The theoretical analyses provided show how scientifically licensed forgetting is a key mechanism of fact production, what Hayles termed constrained constructivism.



11:30am - 11:45am
ID: 160 / PS-01: 2
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Theory
Keywords: Information Practices, Foundations of Information Science; Power/knowledge, Information Theory

Reconciling Authority and Agency Through Information Practices Research

Michael Olsson

University of the Philippines, Philippines

Authority and Agency have been central concepts in information science since its beginnings in 19th century documentalism. This paper begins with a brief historical overview of how these concepts have been constructed in the traditional and user-centred paradigms. It will then explore how an information practices perspective affords the possibility of seeing authority and agency not as oppositional but rather as synergistic: two sides of the same theoretical coin. This exploration will be contextualised by examples drawn from the author’s own research over more than two decades across a range of studies. This body of research includes studies of academic, artistic and serious leisure communities.



11:45am - 12:15pm
ID: 202 / PS-01: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: manufacturing enterprises, information flow, innovation value chain, multi-agent simulation

Research on Information Flow Mechanism of Manufacturing Enterprises from the Perspective of Innovation Value Chain

Xiudan Yang, Xiaoying Qi

Hebei University, People's Republic of China

In order to reflect the interactions, flow-path differences and nonlinear laws among manufacturing enterprises’ innovation units and to reveal relations between information-flowing efficiency and innovation capabilities, the paper divides innovation activities of manufacturing enterprises into three phases, such as information acquisition, information transformation and information value addition based on the theory of innovation value chain, and puts forward a mathematical model of information absorption and transformation to ultimately reveal the mechanisms for information flow across inside and outside units. Further, the paper takes a non-linear function for absorptive capacity based on level of experiential knowledge, continuous R&D intensity, and agent relation strength to quantify the information absorption and transformation process and takes index of innovation information amount and cumulative information amount to calculate innovation abilities and measure information value addition. Finally, the paper uses simulation tool to analyze the influencing factors of information absorption and transformation optimization.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmPaper Session 02: Student Award Session
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Howard Rosenbaum, Indiana University, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
11:00am - 11:30am
ID: 301 / PS-02: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Digital Information, Visual Arts

Creative Connections: The Value of Digital Information and its Effective Management for Sustainable Contemporary Visual Art Practice

Laura Molloy

Committee on Data of the International Science Council (CODATA), France

My paper will provide an overview of the main themes and selected key findings of my doctoral dissertation, ‘Creative Connections: the value of digital information objects and their effective management for sustainable contemporary visual art practice’. This study provides a novel analysis of visual art making in the UK.

Based on evidence derived from a series of detailed qualitative case-study interviews, the research clarifies the value of digital information use in contemporary visual art practice in the UK and the current digital object management skills base in the visual art community. A practitioner-focused, qualitative methodology produces deep understanding of how artists spend their time and value particular resources in making their work.

The study findings provide an evidence base for the use of policy makers in the visual arts sector and for providers of education and training in the visual arts, with profound implications for the fit-to-need of current curricula in tertiary and professional art education. This study analyses and clarifies the extent to which the information sciences are reaching this profession, and how the professional art community may benefit from engagement with information science concepts and practices as a tool in the struggle to stay in practice.



11:30am - 12:00pm
ID: 303 / PS-02: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Digital Information, Visual Arts

Bridging Sight and Insight: Visualization in Action Among Digital Humanists

Rongqian Ma

University of Pittsburgh, USA

Digital humanities (DH) have gradually developed into an interdisciplinary field and a “battleground” between different research methods and conventions. As increasing numbers of scholars entered the DH landscape from various knowledge domains, one central concern was how digital technologies influenced the landscape of DH, which scholars have discussed intensively but without achieving agreement. These theoretical discussions, however, did not provide empirical insight into the actual shape of DH under the technological influence. This dissertation study addresses this broad concern focusing on one specific, emerging DH practice, i.e., the visualization practice. Widely presented in research outputs and applied during research processes, visualization embodies cross-field collaborative practices among DH scholars and functions as an indicator for the field’s evolution. I take a Latourian approach to investigate how digital humanists, defined as any researchers or practitioners engaging in DH work, leverage visualizations as “immutable mobiles” to produce, transfer, and communicate humanities knowledge, both in research outputs and during the research process. I apply a sequential, explanatory mixed-methods design, quantitatively examining the use patterns of visual inscriptions in DH journal articles over the last ten years, then proceeding to the underlying, implicit decision-making processes and practices of visualization among digital humanists of.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmNorth-South Scholarly Collaboration: Opportunities and Experiences in Africa (ASIS&T Africa Chapter and SIG-III)
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 189 / [Single Presentation of ID 189]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Developing countries; Exchange programs; North-South collaboration; Visiting professors; Knowledge sharing

Diane Sonnenwald1, Ina Fourie2, Abebe Rorissa3, Heidi Julien4, Jaya Raju5, Daniel Alemneh6

1UCD, Ireland; 2University of Pretoria, South Africa; 3University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA; 4University at Buffalo, SUNY, USA; 5University of Cape Town, South Africa; 6University of North Texas, USA

North-South scholarly collaboration and academic exchange programs help to address the challenges experienced by developing countries in Africa and elsewhere, and provide unique benefits to scholars in developed countries. Many academics in the global north, however, have limited, or no, information about opportunities to visit academics and institutions in developing countries and those in such countries do not have contacts to whom they can reach out. The intention of the panel is to stimulate future north-south collaborations by increasing awareness of both funded opportunities and low budget initiatives for scholarly exchanges and collaborations, benefits for scholars and their institutions in developed and developing countries, and best practices with respect to north-south collaborations and scholarly exchanges. This panel is sponsored by the Africa Chapter and SIG-III.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmConceptualizing Relevance of Information as a Social Justice Issue: An Interactive Panel Discussion
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 226 / [Single Presentation of ID 226]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Diversity; Equity; Inclusion; Relevance; Social Justice

Joseph Winberry1, LaVerne Gray2, Jean Hardy3, Baheya Jaber4, Bharat Mehra4

1University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA; 2Syracuse University, USA; 3Michigan State University, USA; 4University of Alabama, USA

Relevance is a notion whose meaning and purpose have been widely discussed in information retrieval research. The ultimate aim of relevance—what Tefko Saracevic has called the “you know” principle—is to ensure that users have the information necessary to meet their goals. What is often missing from this discussion is a critical assessment of who gets to decide what information is relevant, under what circumstances, and for what purposes—especially in relation to marginalized populations. The limited discussion of social justice in information relevance research is a gap this interactive panel discussion seeks to address. Five emerging, junior, and senior researchers will each identify and outline social justice themes of information relevance (e.g., intersectionality, Black feminist lens, geography, immigration status, and holistic critical relevance) that have been evident in their own scholarship. Audience members will have an opportunity to expand on one of the five themes in concert with a panelist before participants consider together future directions for relevance of information in a social justice context. While each participant may have different definitions of social justice, a broad interpretation of the term will frame the conversation by indicating how information relevance can move society towards a fairer and more equitable future.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmPaper Session 03: The intersection of AI, LIS, and Ethics
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Dania Bilal, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA
 
11:00am - 11:30am
ID: 165 / PS-03: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: libraries, surveillance, technology, liberation, critical

The Library/Surveillance Interface

Diana Floegel1, Philip Doty2

1Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, USA; 2The University of Texas at Austin, USA

Few topics are more often discussed than surveillance, particularly in the context of surveillance technologies that reflect structural inequities. There is space, however, to bring more discussion of surveillance tech into the library literature. At the same time, literature on digital surveillance and associated systems such as Big Data, surveillance capitalism, and platform capitalism often discuss these phenomena as if they are novel rather than iterations of long-standing inequitable circumstances. We propose that a dialogue between surveillance literature and critical library literature will benefit both areas: theories from the surveillance domain can strengthen examinations of structural oppression in libraries while theories from critical library literature can strengthen acknowledgment of surveillance techs’ historical roots. Moreover, overlap exists between concepts used in surveillance and library literature, including concerns about neutrality and classification practices. Therefore, after reviewing surveillance theories and their applicability to libraries, we demonstrate how these scholarly areas may strengthen each other, with three major consequences: (a) moving library literature beyond considerations of the panopticon in favor of the surveillant assemblage; (b) recognizing that surveillance tech is a hyper-visible form of historical oppression; and (c) acknowledging that the library ethos is critical to any fight for justice within information science.



11:30am - 11:45am
ID: 167 / PS-03: 2
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: AI literacy, AI learning and teaching, AI in education, AI ethics, AI literacy questionnaire

AI Literacy: Definition, Teaching, Evaluation, and Ethical Issues

Davy Tsz Kit Ng, Jac Ka Lok Leung, Kai Wah Samuel Chu, Maggie Shen Qiao

University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is at the top of the agenda for education leaders today in educating the next generation across the globe. However, public understanding of AI technologies and how to define AI literacy is under-explored. This vision poses upcoming challenges for our next generation to learn about AI. On this note, an exploratory review was conducted to conceptualize the newly emerging concept “AI literacy”, in search for a sound theoretical foundation to define, teach and evaluate AI literacy. Grounded in literature on 18 existing peer-reviewed articles, this review proposed four aspects (i.e, know and understand, use, evaluate, and ethical issues) for fostering AI literacy based on the adaptation of classic literacies. This study sheds light on the consolidated definition, teaching, and ethical concerns on AI literacy, establishing the groundwork for future research such as competency development and assessment criteria on AI literacy.



11:45am - 12:15pm
ID: 204 / PS-03: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: library and information science; artificial intelligence; foundations of information science; research methods

Not Quite ‘Ask a Librarian’: AI on the Nature, Value, and Future of LIS

Jesse Dinneen, Helen Bubinger

Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany

AI language models trained on Web data generate prose that reflects human knowledge and public sentiments, but can also contain novel insights and predictions. We asked the world’s best language model, GPT-3, fifteen difficult questions about the nature, value, and future of library and information science (LIS), topics that receive perennial attention from LIS scholars. We present highlights from its 45 different responses, which range from platitudes and caricatures to interesting perspectives and worrisome visions of the future, thus providing an LIS-tailored demonstration of the current performance of AI language models. We also reflect on the viability of using AI to forecast or generate research ideas in this way today. Finally, we have shared the full response log online for readers to consider and evaluate for themselves.



12:15pm - 12:30pm
ID: 110 / PS-03: 4
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Artificial Intelligence Education; Artificial Intelligence Ethics; Ethics Education; Pedagogy; Thematic Analysis

Five Motivating Concerns for AI Ethics Instruction

Mariah Knowles

University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA

Artificial Intelligence (AI) systems are embedded in institutions that are not diverse, that are inequitable, unjust, and exclusionary. How do we address the interface between AI systems and an unjust world, in service to human flourishing? One mechanism for addressing AI Ethics is AI Ethics Education: training those who will build, use, and/or be subject to AI systems to have clear moral reasoning, make responsible decisions, and take right actions. This paper presents, as part of a larger project, work on what AI Ethics instructors currently do and how they describe their motivating concerns. I find that although AI Ethics content and pedagogy is varied, there are some common motivating concerns particular to this kind of teaching, which may be useful in structuring future guidance for new AI Ethics teachers, evaluating existing pedagogy, guiding research on new pedagogies, and promoting discussion with the AI Ethics community.

 
12:45pm - 1:45pmNew Member Orientation Lunch (Invitation Only)
Location: Skylight Ballroom, 2nd Floor, Marriott
2:00pm - 3:30pmAcademic Publishing in the Future: What's Next?
Location: Salon A, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Sandra Hirsh, San Jose State University, USA
Session Chair: Don Turnbull, Aqua M&A, USA
 
ID: 343 / [Single Presentation of ID 343]: 1
Publisher Panel
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: publishing

Steven Sawyer1, Denice Adkins2, John Budd2, Andrew Dillon3, Susanne Filler4

1Syracuse University, USA; 2University of Missouri, USA; 3The University of Texas at Austin, USA; 4Morgan & Claypool Publishers, USA

Journal and series editors will share their ideas about the future of publishing. They will discuss their work as editors and the challenges and opportunities they see going forward in managing and advocating for excellence.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmRacial Attacks during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Politicizing an Epidemic Crisis on Longstanding Racism and Misinformation, Disinformation, and Misconception
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 284 / [Single Presentation of ID 284]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: misinformation; disinformation; COVID-19; xenophobia; racism

Miyoung Chong1, Thomas Froehlich2, Kai Shu3

1University of Virginia, USA; 2Kent State University, USA; 3Illinois Institute of Technology, USA

The COVID-19 pandemic crisis has affected everyone’s life on a daily basis for more than a year. However, some racial groups have experienced a double pandemic, that of COVID-19 and racist attacks incorrectly tied to the pandemic. Harassment and physical intimidation were the source of many anti-Asian attacks. The number of unarmed black people assaulted and killed by police almost tripled during 2020 when compared 2019. In this panel, we will attempt to analyze recent racial attacks in terms of malinformation, such as misinformation, disinformation, or shallow, historical stereotypes of ethnic minorities as another layer of the pandemic originating with racism or inflamed grievances. The panelists will discuss the proposed topic drawing from each panelist’s expertise and an interactive discussion with the audience will follow after each panelist’s presentation. Members and attendees at ASIS&T who have an interest in the spread of dis- and misinformation via social media and politicizing the pandemic crisis will find our topics useful to their research.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmPaper Session 04: Transformation, Pedagogy, and Information Literacy
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Miyoung Chong, University of Virginia, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
ID: 195 / PS-04: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Archival education; Library and Information Science education; ethics of care; online learning; pedagogy

“It Makes Me Sad”: Archival Pedagogy in a Time of Covid-19

Alex Poole1, Jane Zhang2

1Drexel University, USA; 2Catholic University of America, USA

Despite COVID-19’s devastating repercussions on higher education, scholars have yet to address its impact on Library and Information Science pedagogy. This exploratory qualitative case study centers on how archival educators weathered the onslaught of the pandemic. Drawing upon semistructured interviews with 31 archival educators and documentary evidence, this research addresses the sudden shift to online education; the concomitant loss of hands-on work opportunities and the workarounds educators developed; affectivity and an emergent ethics of pedagogical care among students and educators; and educators’ lessons learned from the pandemic and their future projections regarding archival education. This paper illuminates the evolving landscape of pedagogy and its attendant challenges preparing the next generation of archival professionals during an unprecedented period of duress.



ID: 196 / PS-04: 2
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Data science education; pedagogy; Library and Information Science; iSchools; data science

LEADING the Way: A New Model for Data Science Education

Alex Poole

Drexel University, USA

Addressing the data skills gap, namely the superabundance of data and the lack of human capital to exploit it, this paper argues that iSchools and Library and Information Science programs are ideal venues for data science education. It unpacks two case studies: the LIS Education and Data Science for the National Digital Platform (LEADS-4-NDP) project (2017-2019), and the LIS Education and Data Science-Integrated Network Group (LEADING) project (2020-2023). These IMLS-funded initiatives respond to four national digital platform challenges: LIS faculty prepared to teach data science and mentor the next generation of educators and practitioners, an underdeveloped pedagogical infrastructure, scattered and inconsistent data science education opportunities for students and current information professionals, and an immature data science network. LEADS and LEADING have made appreciable collaborative, interdisciplinary contributions to the data science education community; these projects comprise an essential part of the long-awaited and much-needed national digital platform.



2:00pm - 2:15pm
ID: 290 / PS-04: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Fourth Industrial Revolution
Keywords: Digital readiness, digital maturity, digital readiness assessment, digital transformation, Africa

Digital Readiness Assessment of Countries in Africa: A Case Study Research

Shimelis Assefa1, Abebe Rorissa2, Daniel Alemneh3

1University of Denver, USA; 2University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA; 3University of North Texas, USA

There is an increasing uptake of digital technologies across African countries. Public, private, and government services have adopted digital technologies to improve work processes, create jobs, and better service delivery. This short paper seeks to answer: 1) What is the current state of digital readiness in African countries? 2) Do existing digital readiness assessment tools and metrics help to assess the digital readiness of countries in Africa? Analysis of publicly available data from Cisco index of readiness score and Broadband speed ranking by cable.co.uk, reveal that: 1) African countries' digital readiness score is below the global average of 11.96, on a scale of 0 to 25 (except Tunisia with score of 12.05); and 2) African countries' broadband speed is below the global mean speed of 25Mbps (mean speed of 4.51 and 3.80 Mbps for sub-Saharan Africa and North Africa, respectively). Second, analysis of various assessment tools show that the existing metrics can't be used as is to diagnose and evaluate Africa's digital readiness. Instead factors such as infrastructure; last-mile connectivity to homes, schools, etc.; and skill gaps should be considered. This study shows the need for an appropriate assessment tools so countries in Africa prioritize efforts to embrace digital readiness.



2:15pm - 2:30pm
ID: 182 / PS-04: 4
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Tattoos; information; information behavior, personal information management.

Tattoos and Information: Mapping the Landscape of Tattoo Research

Maja Krtalic, Jennifer Campbell-Meier, Rachel Bell

Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

This paper is the initial discussion of a larger project Tattoo and Information, exploring tattoos as an information and communication phenomenon from multicultural perspectives and various use purposes. The overall purpose of the project is to provide insight into information seeking and experience in the context of tattoos in order to identify information literacy, visual literacy and cultural literacy skills as well as communications skills necessary for a successful tattoo experience in Aotearoa New Zealand. In this paper, we present findings from the literature review accompanied by preliminary insights from four interviews. The findings reflect thematic areas of research focusing on tattoos and gaps that exist. We used interviews to capture what topics emerge from tattoo narratives and whether they align with topics and gaps identified in the literature review. Based on the findings, we identify areas for future research.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmMotivation, Building Relationships, and the Role of Belonging in Distance Learning (SIG-ED)
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 205 / [Single Presentation of ID 205]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: distance learning, belonging, mentoring, graduate students, undergraduate students

Rachel Williams1, Danielle Pollock1, Agnes Mainka2, Michael Brinkmeier2, Elisaweta Ossovski2

1Simmons College, USA; 2Institute for Computer Science Universität Osnabrück, Germany

This SIG-ED panel addresses the role of belonging in distance learning in a variety of learning contexts, including typical online courses as well as in independent studies and other mentoring contexts. The panel explores the impact of belonging on student success and considers how instructors’ choices in course design, technology use, mentoring, and other aspects of distance learning can enhance or detract from fostering a sense of belonging.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmPaper Session 05: Trust in Technology
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Jiangen He, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA
 
2:00pm - 2:30pm
ID: 113 / PS-05: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Trusted AI, Intelligent Personal Assistant, Human Computer Interaction, Voice Interaction, Models

Why Do You Trust Siri? The Factors Affecting Trustworthiness of Intelligent Personal Assistant

Dan Wu, Ye-man Huang

Wuhan University, People's Republic of China

Trust greatly contributes to human-AI collaboration, however, human’s trust to IPA is hard to establish and lacks exploration. The purpose of this paper is to recognize the factors that affect the trustworthiness of IPA. 358 questionnaires were analyzed by PLS-SEM to construct the model, while thematic analysis was used to discover expectance of IPA. Chi-square tests and T-test were used to distinguish the difference between two user groups. Three factors that capability of system, personality of agent, and availability of interface have a significant impact on the trustworthiness of IPA. The capability of system is the most essential as the threshold with users’ plenty of expectations. Most users pay less attention to the availability of interface and the personality of agent has a great impact on the trustworthiness of IPA. The factors found enrich the trusted AI research and inspire insights of design of IPA.



2:30pm - 3:00pm
ID: 244 / PS-05: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: COVID-19, coronavirus, Google Autocomplete, conspiracy theory, social contagion

“COVID19 is_”: The Perpetuation of Coronavirus Conspiracy Theories via Google Autocomplete

Daniel Houli, Marie Radford, Vivek Singh

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, USA

As the COVID-19 pandemic spread in 2020, uncertainty surrounding its origins and nature led to widespread conspiracy-related theories (CRT). Use of technological platforms enabled the rapid and exponential spread of COVID-19 CRT. This study applies social contagion theory to examine how Google Autocomplete (GA) perpetuates COVID-19 CRT. An in-house software program, Autocomplete Search Logging Tool (ASLT) captured a snapshot of GA COVID-19 related searches early in the pandemic (from March to May 2020) across 76 randomly-selected countries to gain insight into search behaviors thought to reflect beliefs globally. The authors identified 15 keywords relating to COVID-19 CRT predictions. Findings show that the searches across different countries received varying degrees of GA COVID-19 CRT predictions. This investigation is among the first to apply social contagion theory to autocomplete applications and can be used in future research to explain and perhaps mitigate the spread of CRT.



3:00pm - 3:30pm
ID: 266 / PS-05: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Voice Digital Assistants, Interface Mirroring, Voice Switching Behavior, Inclusive Design

Hey There! What Do You Look Like? User Voice Switching and Interface Mirroring in Voice-Enabled Digital Assistants (VDAs)

Dania Bilal, Jessica Barfield

University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA

We investigated user voice switching behavior (VSB) in voice-enabled digital assistants (VDAs), focusing on the importance of and preference for the voice accents, genders, and age to match with those of the users. We incorporated images of ten people with diverse races, ethnicities, age, genders, and religions to embody the voice interfaces (EVIs). In an online survey, we collected demographic, background, and VDA usage data. The sample consisted of 214 participants recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk (http://mturk.com). The participants were selected based on owning a VDA (e.g., Alexa Home) or owning a device (e.g., smartphone, tablet, or computer), and setting the device on English as the default language. The age of the participants ranged from 18-35 years. Findings revealed that, regardless of age, the majority of the participants switched the voice interface and for various reasons. Further, participants placed importance on voice matching with their gender, accent, and age. Participants ranked the young White female, Asian female, and Black female EVIs as the most preferred for voice switching and interactions. We coin the concept, Interface mirroring, which should help designers to create more diverse and inclusive EVIs, ensuring fairness and equality in the design of VDAs.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmPaper Session 06: Repositories and Digital Collections: Infrastructure and Sustainability
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Johanna Cohoon, The University of Texas at Austin, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
2:00pm - 2:30pm
ID: 102 / PS-06: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Data infrastructures, Infrastructure characteristics, Platforms, Research data repositories, re3data.org

Understanding Research Data Repositories as Infrastructures

Ceilyn Boyd

Simmons University, USA

This study discusses the properties of research data repositories and explores metadata about 2,646 entries in the Registry of Research Data Repositories (re3data.org) to identify the characteristics attributed to infrastructures they exhibit. The results reveal how research data repositories function as information infrastructure for scientific community members and contribute to the small body of literature that examines data repositories through a socio-technical lens.



2:30pm - 2:45pm
ID: 107 / PS-06: 2
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: research data management, archives, policies, decision-making, research support

Policies, Procedures, and Decision-Making: Data Managers and the Research Lifecycle

Anthony Million1, Jenny Bossaller2

1University of Michigan, USA; 2University of Missouri, USA

Research data is an asset. Researchers may be required to provide access to their data by scientific funders or aca-demic journals and deposit their data in archives. Managers of archives are guided by principles, policies, and the law when curating and providing access to data. Practices around data storage and access, however, are not always cut and dry; research data managers sometimes need to interpret policies. This paper presents findings from qualita-tive interviews with 15 data managers from 8 repositories in the U.S. These repositories were all affiliated with uni-versities but served varied constituents and provided a range of services. Differences revealed opportunities and chal-lenges in managing data repositories regarding, for instance, who can access data and the level of protection data requires. We also found that data-related policy challenges may stem from any stage of the research lifecycle.



2:45pm - 3:00pm
ID: 179 / PS-06: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Trustworthy Digital Repositories, Societal Impact, Taxonomy

Towards a Taxonomy of Trustworthy Digital Repository Impacts

Devan Donaldson, Samuel Russell

Indiana University, USA

Measuring the societal impact of digital repositories is a wicked problem. To capture information about the impacts of digital repositories that become certified as Trustworthy Digital Repositories (TDRs), a taxonomy describing activities cited as evidence of compliance with TDR standards is needed to relate those activities to socially beneficial outcomes. This paper presents a Minimum Viable Prototype (MVP) for a TDR Impacts taxonomy to enable the expression of their activities in a structured way. Our MVP provides a proof-of-concept that by formalizing concepts about TDRs in a taxonomy, we can investigate ways to measure whether the impacts associated with becoming and remaining a certified TDR are also impacts that generate societal value. Implications of the work described include potential strategies to identify, extract, and/or author machine-readable descriptions of measurable facets of TDR activities and the resulting impacts on communities.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmProfessional Development Committee Meeting
Location: Snowbird, 2nd Floor, Marriott
3:30pm - 4:00pmCoffee Break
Location: Ballroom Prefunction, Lobby Level, Marriott
4:00pm - 5:30pmYouth Information Interaction Research in the Pandemic: Adjustments, Innovations, Implications
Location: Salon A, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 208 / [Single Presentation of ID 208]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Digital youth; Information behavior; Digital divides; COVID-19

Vanessa Figueiredo1, Eric Meyers1, Dania Bilal2, Sophie Rutter3, Rachel Magee4

1University of British Columbia, Canada; 2University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA; 3University of Sheffield, UK; 4University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

For over a year, the pandemic has forced youth to alter their routines and rely almost exclusively on technology to learn, play and connect with family and friends. Although some alterations in youth’s routine seem to be temporary, some adaptations and appropriations resulting from interactions with technology will likely be forever altered. As this scenario develops, we must reflect on how these permanent changes will affect our approaches and inquiries on youth information interaction. This 90-minute panel will convene scholars and members of the ASIS&T community interested in discussing the present and the future of digital youth research. Panelists will mediate focused conversations with participants to generate a collective account of experiences and reflections based on challenges and research plans for after the pandemic. As the implications of a global pandemic are unfolding, youth information interaction research will be critical to inform policies and programs in education and reduce digital divides.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmWelcome to Information Science (SIG-HFIS)
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 222 / [Single Presentation of ID 222]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Information science, intellectual history, disciplinary identity(s), indigenous ways of knowing

Jenna Hartel1, Marcia Bates2, Vishma Bhattarai3, LaVerne Gray4, Patrick Keilty1, Sandy Littletree5

1University of Toronto, Canada; 2University of California, Los Angeles, USA; 3Enoch Pratt Free Library, USA; 4Syracuse University, USA; 5University of Washington, ISA

This panel engages conference attendees in the history and foundations of information science and provides an opportunity to reflect upon our field’s current and future identity(s). It enacts the following scenario: At an orientation event for an information science program a spokesperson gives incoming students a brief address on the theme, “Welcome to information science.” Six imaginative but authentic versions of that talk are offered here. To showcase the variety of approaches to information science across the past century, each disquisition is inspired by the work of one luminary, namely: Paul Otlet, S. R. Ranganathan, Jesse H. Shera, Elfreda Chatman, and Marcia J. Bates. In an effort to encourage a more spacious information science, an indigenous perspective on ways of knowing is also included. Attendees to this session will time-travel across almost 100 years of information science history and ultimately rest in the reality of a multi-perspective discipline.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmPaper Session 07: Information Interactions with the Healthcare System
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Souvick Ghosh, San José State University, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
4:00pm - 4:30pm
ID: 137 / PS-07: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Alpha-Gal meat allergy, clinician–patient relationship, clinical notes

Using Symptoms and Healthcare Encounters to Capture a Rare Disease: A Study of Clinical Notes of the Alpha-Gal Meat Allergy

Yuanye Ma, Mary Grace Flaherty

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA

This paper examines clinical notes to identify reported symptoms and investigate patient-provider communication processes in alpha-gal syndrome (AGS). Clinical notes appear to be a credible and stable source of research where the researcher can find information regarding both symptoms and environmental factors of AGS. Compilation of notes could be used for a checklist to aid in diagnosis. This study analyzed clinicians’ notes in patient records retrieved from the Electronic Medical Record Search Engine (EMERSE). The most reported symptoms fell into four general categories: skin (42%), inflammation (17%), gastrointestinal (20%), and anaphylaxis (21%). Environmental triggers were also commonly reported. This in-depth analysis of clinical notes of AGS can serve as a basis for future automation of rare disease analysis; moreover, it provides a basic understanding of the granularity of information that an electronic health record (EHR) may provide for rare disease identification.



4:30pm - 4:45pm
ID: 206 / PS-07: 2
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Information behavior, Vaccination decision-making, COVID-19 vaccine

Health Information Behavior in the Context of Medical Decision-Making: An Exploratory Study Based on Vaccination in Beijing

Yuhao Zhang, Guangchun Zheng

Renming University, People's Republic of China

COVID-19 vaccination could be the most economical and effective public health intervention to prevent and control novel coronavirus. Beijing is one of the first regions in China to implement the COVID-19 vaccination policy, we conducted semi-structured interview on 20 participants with past vaccination AND/OR COVID-19 vaccination decision-making. This study summarizes the consistency and particularity in the context of decision-making in terms of information sources, information content and information behavior.



4:45pm - 5:00pm
ID: 279 / PS-07: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: LGBTQ+ populations, care-seeking, information seeking, information use, incidental information acquisition

Discrimination in Healthcare and LGBTQ+ Information and Care-Seeking Behaviors

Lindsay Brown, Tiffany Veinot

University of Michigan, USA

Members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning, plus (LGBTQ+) community may face discrimination in healthcare, which can subsequently impact information and care-seeking patterns. A tendency to avoid or delay health care is particularly concerning for LGBTQ+ people who faces both physical and mental health disparities. This paper presents a narrative review of literature on healthcare discrimination, LGBTQ+ care-seeking, and associated information behaviors in order to generate a preliminary model of LGBTQ+ decision-making around care and well-being, called the Model of the Pathways to LGBTQ+ Well-Being. This model can be used to investigate links between information behavior and relevant health behaviors and outcomes in a marginalized population.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmAntiracism in the LIS Profession: Not Just Lip Service
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 154 / [Single Presentation of ID 154]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Antiracism in LIS, Racism as Public Health Threat, LIS Core Principles in Battling Racism, Actions and Initiatives, Equity in Service & Access

Rong Tang1, Xan Goodman2, Rebecca Davis1, Jia Tina Du3, David Leonard4

1Simmons University, USA; 2University of Nevada Las Vegas, USA; 3University of South Australia, Australia; 4Boston Public Library, USA

With rising cases of brutality, gun violence, and racial injustice towards particularly the Black and AAPI (Asians, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders) communities, racism is being recognized and declared as an emergency and public health threat. Diversity, equity, and antiracism are core to the Library and Information Science (LIS) profession as we strive to uphold the principle of “libraries serve humanities” and the motto of “free to all.” During this extended period of ‘racial-injustice as a public crisis,’ what are the roles of LIS professionals in battling racism, violence, and other systems of oppression? This panel session features experienced LIS professionals and educators who specialize in DEI, reporting their activities, stories, and thoughts on antiracism. A breakout room activity is envisioned following panelists’ presentations, with participants discussing and sharing their antiracism initiatives. Participants will also brainstorm the next course of action in the LIS profession’s journey in battling racism.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmPaper Session 08: Scientometrics and Bibliometrics
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Ly Dinh, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
 
4:00pm - 4:15pm
ID: 101 / PS-08: 1
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Bibliometrics, Library and Information Science, Scholarly communication, Scientific communities

Journals as Communities: A Case Study of Core Journals in LIS

Jeppe Nicolaisen1, Tove Faber Frandsen2

1University of Copenhagen, Denmark; 2University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

This paper proposes an indicator for measuring the level of commitment to academic journals. The indicator is demonstrated on a sample of core LIS-journals. By monitoring authorship patterns over a 20-year period, it is shown that some journals have a higher frequency of returning authors than others, consequently showing a larger degree of community commitment. The paper discusses how the indicator may be applied when studying factors influencing researchers’ journal selection decisions.



4:15pm - 4:45pm
ID: 118 / PS-08: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education; Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education; Information Literacy, Higher education; Bibliometric mapping analysis

Research Trends from a Decade (2011-2020) for Information Literacy in Higher Education: Content and Bibliometric Mapping Analysis

Chao-Chen Chen1, Ning-Chiao Wang2, Yun-Fang Tu3, Hsin Ju Lin4

1Chung Yuan Christian University and National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan; 2University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA; 3Fu Jen Catholic University, Taiwan; 4National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan

New terms and theoretical concepts in information literacy have emerged over the last decade, and these have led to revisions in the standards for information literacy. In order to determine whether information literacy research has reflected these trends, we collected SSCI literature for the 2011 to 2020 period related to information literacy in higher education (ILHE) and conducted analysis using bibliographic mapping and content analysis. Our research found that the volume of research on ILHE has increased in the last five years as compared to the five years before that, and that keywords related to literacy (such as “digital literacy” and “multiliteracies”) have been getting a great deal of discussion. After the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (FILHE) was announced, curriculum design research based on the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (ILCSHE) continued to outnumber that done based on the Framework.



4:45pm - 5:00pm
ID: 230 / PS-08: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Open Access; Bibliometrics analysis; Research impact; Self-citation; Covid-19;

Use of Bibliometrics Data to Understand the Citation Advantages of Different Open Access Categories in Covid-19 Related Studies

Xiaoju Julie Chen, Neelam Bharti, Matthew Marsteller

Carnegie Mellon University, USA

The number of Open Access (OA) research articles is trending upward. This research aims to understand the correlations between different OA types and the impact of OA research articles evaluated based on the citation numbers. To avoid bias caused by the publication year, we chose to use COVID-19 studies in different fields to take advantage of this topic’s quick turnaround of data. We analyzed the bibliometrics data and citation numbers (excluding self-citations) of around 42,000 English language articles published in 2020 related to COVID-19. We evaluated different types of OA categories such as Gold, Bronze, and Hybrid articles separately. Results show that amongst all OA categories, Hybrid/Green and Bronze/Green OA articles had significant citation advantages. Green OA articles returned more citations than articles with the other OA status. Gold OA articles have no citation advantages compared to non-OA articles. Gold/Green OA articles had the highest self-citation rates, followed by Non-OA articles. The results of the study can be used in understanding different OA categories and the reasons for OA choices. Certain strategies can be made accordingly to improve the awareness of OA in different fields and help OA publishers to improve the OA services.



5:00pm - 5:30pm
ID: 240 / PS-08: 4
Long Papers
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Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: citations, scientometrics, citation motives, influence, scholarly publishing

Citation Quantity Increases Citation Quality

Misha Teplitskiy1, Eamon Duede2, Michael Menietti3, Karim Lakhani3

1University of Michigan, USA; 2University of Chicago, USA; 3Harvard University, USA

Scholars typically measure the influence of scientific work using citation counts, but many citations are symbolic and denote little-to-no influence. A common view is that highly cited papers may be especially appealing for “persuasion by name-dropping” and attract many symbolic citations, making their citations denote less influence on average. Here, we rigorously test this view using customized author surveys about the intellectual influence of referenced work on an author’s own papers, collecting data on 17,154 referencing decisions from 9,380 corresponding authors. Results are contrary to persuasion by name-dropping: while most citations (54%) had little influence on their citers, citations to the most highly cited papers were two to three times more likely to denote high influence. To explain this pattern we develop a process model based on status signals, and support it with experimental and associational data. Overall, we find that authors invest more attention into highly cited papers and cite them less symbolically, making these papers influence the research frontier even more than their raw citation counts suggest.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmPublications Committee Meeting
Location: Snowbird, 2nd Floor, Marriott
6:00pm - 7:00pmWelcome Reception and SIG-RUSH
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