Conference Agenda (All times are shown in Mountain Daylight Time)

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
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Session Overview
Date: Monday, 01/Nov/2021
7:30am - 5:00pmSpeaker Ready Room
Location: Park City, 2nd Floor, Marriott
7:30am - 6:00pmRegistration
Location: Ballroom B Foyer, Lobby Level, Marriott
8:00am - 9:30amCollaborative Efforts and Success Story of an Open-Learning Program: Partnership Growth of the Research Data Management Librarian Academy (RDMLA)
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 216 / [Single Presentation of ID 216]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Research Data Management Librarian Academy; collaboration and partnership growth; open learning and diverse learner needs; education equity; global RDM community of practice

Rong Tang1, Ceilyn Boyd2, Andrew Creamer4, Adam Kriesberg1, Elaine Martin3, Rebecca Morin5, Zhan Hu1, Ashley Thomas3

1Simmons University, USA; 2Harvard University, USA; 3Harvard Medical School, USA; 4Brown University, USA; 5Tufts University, USA

Launched in October 2019, the Research Data Management Librarian Academy (RDMLA) addresses the learning gaps in RDM training. Through a unique partnership among practicing librarians, LIS faculty, and industry, the RDMLA has produced a dynamic open learning experience, highlighting the benefits of collaboration and skill-sharing. This collaboration’s success lies in how the project leveraged each partner’s strengths and experience while centering on the shared purpose, dedication to equitable learning, and mutual respect among the team members. This panel focuses on the collaborative efforts undertaken by the RDMLA leadership and instructors to develop an open-access professional development education program. Five panelists will share their experience working on this large collaborative project from varying perspectives, the lessons learned while developing their content, the challenges they encountered, and their understanding of the benefits of such a collaborative endeavor in producing free, open-access learning to foster a community of practice in RDM.

 
8:00am - 9:30amPaper Session 09: Text and Data Processing
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Haihua Chen, University of North Texas, USA
 
8:00am - 8:30am
ID: 184 / PS-09: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Wikipedia article quality assessment, language representation model, deep ensemble learning

Measuring Quality of Wikipedia Articles by Feature Fusion-Based Stack Learning

Jingrui Hou, Jiangnan Li, Ping Wang

Wuhan University, People's Republic of China

Online open-source knowledge repository such as Wikipedia has become an increasingly important source for users to access knowledge. However, due to its large volume, it is challenging to evaluate Wikipedia article quality manually. To fill this gap, we propose a novel approach named “feature fusion-based stack learning” to assess the quality of Wikipedia articles. Pre-trained language models including BERT (Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers) and ELMo (Embeddings from Language Models) are applied to extract semantic information in Wikipedia content. The feature fusion framework consisting of semantic and statistical features is built and fed into an out-of-sample (OOS) stacking model, which includes both machine learning and deep learning models. We compare the performance of proposed model with some existing models with different metrics extensively, and conduct ablation studies to prove the effectiveness of our framework and OOS stacking. Generally, the experiment shows that our method is much better than state-of-the-art models.



8:30am - 9:00am
ID: 262 / PS-09: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: semantic alignment, fitness assessment, data selection, multiple data streams, data practices

The Reproducible Data Reuse (ReDaR) Framework to Capture and Assess Multiple Data Streams

Donald Keefer, Catherine Blake

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

Much of the literature in knowledge discovery from data (KDD) focuses on algorithms that are faster and more accurate at capturing patterns in a given data set. However, answering a research question is fundamentally connected with how well the data is aligned with the questions being asked. Thus, data selection is one of the most important steps to ensure that models produced from the KDD process are useful in practice. A lack of documentation about the data selection rationale and the transformations needed to semantically align the data streams prevents others from reproducing the research and obfuscates development of best practices in data integration. Our goal in this paper is to provide KDD practitioners with a framework that brings together theories in provenance, information quality, and contextual reasoning, to enable researchers to achieve a semantically aligned dataset with data selection, description, and documentation based on an application-focused assessment.



9:00am - 9:15am
ID: 273 / PS-09: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Organic Materials, Automated Knowledge Extraction, Named-Entity-Recognition, Text Mining, Deep Learning

Text to Insight: Accelerating Organic Materials Knowledge Extraction via Deep Learning

Xintong Zhao1, Steven Lopez2, Semion Saikin3, Xiaohua Hu1, Jane Greenberg1

1Drexel University, USA; 2Northeastern University, USA; 3Kebotix, Inc., USA

Scientific literature is one of the most significant resources for sharing knowledge. Researchers turn to scientific literature as a first step in designing an experiment. Given the extensive and growing volume of literature, the common approach of reading and manually extracting knowledge is too time consuming, creating a bottleneck in the research cycle. This challenge spans nearly every scientific domain. For the materials science, experimental data distributed across millions of publications are extremely helpful for predicting materials properties and the design of novel materials. However, only recently researchers have explored computational approaches for knowledge extraction primarily for inorganic materials. This study aims to explore knowledge extraction for organic materials. We built a research dataset composed of 855 annotated and 708,376 unannotated sentences drawn from 92,667 abstracts. We used named-entity-recognition (NER) with BiLSTM-CNN-CRF deep learning model to automatically extract key knowledge from literature. Early-phase results show a high potential for automated knowledge extraction. The paper presents our findings and a framework for supervised knowledge extraction that can be adapted to other scientific domains.



9:15am - 9:30am
ID: 234 / PS-09: 4
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: book reviews, text mining, affective terms, mood, emotion

Moods in Book Reviews: Text Mining Approach

Hyerim Cho, Denice Adkins, Jenny Bossaller, Heather Moulaison-Sandy

University of Missouri, USA

Spiteri and Pecoskie (2018) proposed a taxonomy of terms to describe emotion and tone in novels. We tested those terms against 5144 full-text book reviews from the New York Times Book Review to discover whether the proposed terms were used in published reviews to describe books, and of those terms used, which were most used. Findings demonstrate that the terms chosen by Spiteri and Pecoskie are used in professional book reviews, though some may be used in multiple ways, rather than only related to emotional content. Results of this work contribute to a larger scale project of testing machine models of identifying emotional content in books and ultimately being able to create automated media recommendation systems that include emotion as an identifier.

 
8:00am - 9:30amConducting and Publishing Research in Developing Countries: Challenges and Solutions (SIG-III and ASIS&T Africa and South Asia Chapters)
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 120 / [Single Presentation of ID 120]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Conducting LIS research, Publishing LIS research, Developing countries, Diverse LIS researchers, Inclusive LIS research

Devendra Potnis1, Bhakti Gala2, Edda Tandi Lwoga3, Md. Anwarul Islam4, Nosheen Fatima Warraich5, Humphrey Keah6, Abebe Rorissa1

1University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA; 2Central University of Gujarat, India; 3College of Business Education, Tanzania; 4University of Dhaka, Bangladesh; 5University of the Punjab, Pakistan; 6FAO of the United Nations, Kenya

Most of the knowledge in the library and information science (LIS) discipline is created and published by researchers in developed countries. Two roundtable sessions of ASIS&T SIG-III with the ASIS&T Africa Chapter and ASIS&T South Asia Chapter, in early 2021, confirmed “the lack of a conducive research environment” as the primary reason for this inequality in the discipline and called for systematic efforts, like this panel, to (a) create awareness about this inequality and (b) start building a global support system for LIS researchers in developing countries. In the first 30 minutes of this panel, six LIS scholars with cultural roots, academic training, and research experience in developing countries will illustrate common challenges to conducting and publishing research in developing countries. In the next 30 minutes, attendees will be divided into groups, with each group facilitated by a panelist, to brainstorm solutions for addressing the challenges related to academic training for conducting and publishing research, accessing resources, institutional support, opportunities for research collaboration and funding, fieldwork, analyzing data, composing manuscripts, and finding mentors, among others. In the last 30 minutes, each group will present its findings.

 
8:00am - 9:30amWhat’s Next for Information World Mapping? International and Multidisciplinary Uses of the Method
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 146 / [Single Presentation of ID 146]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Research Methods
Keywords: Research methods, Visual methods, Arts-involved methods, Qualitative methods, Information behavior

Devon Greyson1, Tien-I Tsai2, Vanessa Kitzie3, Konstantina Martzoukou4, Millicent Mabi5

1University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA; 2National Taiwan University, Taiwan; 3University of South Carolina, USA; 4Robert Gordon University, Scotland; 5University of British Columbia, Canada

As use of arts-involved and data visualization methods increases in information science, it is important to reflect on strengths and weaknesses of various methods. In this 90-minute panel, an international lineup of information researchers will share their experiences using the participatory, visual elicitation technique information world mapping (IWM) in their work. Panelists will discuss ways to adapt the technique to different contexts, share their thoughts on what is next for IWM, and raise questions regarding challenges and new uses of IWM in information research. Presentations will be followed by an interactive discussion among panelists and Q&A period with the audience.

 
8:00am - 9:30amPaper Session 10: Research Data Management
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Yi-Yun Cheng, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
 
8:00am - 8:30am
ID: 260 / PS-10: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Data Curation; Sensitive Data; Collective Harms; Data Sharing; Open Science

Collective Harms and Contextual Integrity for Sensitive Data

Nicholas Weber

University of Washington, USA

Privacy protections for human subject data are often focused on reducing individual harms that result from improper disclosure of personally identifiable information. However, in a networked environment where information infrastructures enable rapid sharing and linking of different datasets there exist numerous harms which abstract to group or collective levels. In this paper we discuss how privacy protections aimed at individual harms, as opposed to collective or group harms, results in an incompatible notion of privacy protections for social science research that synthesizes multiple data sources. Using the framework of Contextual Integrity, we present empirical scenarios drawn from 17 in-depth interviews with researchers conducting synthetic research using one or more privacy sensitive data sources. We use these scenarios to identify ways that digital infrastructure providers can help social scientists manage collective harms over time through specific, targeted privacy engineering of supporting research infrastructures and data curation.



8:30am - 9:00am
ID: 172 / PS-10: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Research data management, metadata application profiles, DCAT, FAIR principles

MetaFAIR: A Metadata Application Profile for Managing Research Data

Vivian Tompkins, Brendan Honick, Katherine Polley, Jian Qin

Syracuse University, USA

This paper reports on the development of a metadata application profile (AP), MetaFAIR, designed to support research data management (RDM) to make research data findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable. The development of MetaFAIR followed a three-step process that included learning about the characteristics of datasets from researchers to establish their context and requirements, as well as iterative design and testing with researchers’ feedback. Guided by the FAIR principles, MetaFAIR focuses on accommodating description needs particular to computational social science datasets while seeking to provide general enough elements to describe data collections across many different domains. In this paper, MetaFAIR is placed in the context of historical and recent developments in the areas of RDM and application profile creation; following this contextualization, the paper describes the central considerations and challenges of the MetaFAIR development process and discusses its significance for future work in RDM.



9:00am - 9:30am
ID: 178 / PS-10: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Research data management, metadata, data description, data documentation

Toward Best Practices for Unstructured Descriptions of Research Data

Dan Phillips, Michael Smit

Dalhousie University, Canada

Achieving the potential of widespread sharing of open research data requires that sharing data is straightforward, supported, and well-understood; and that data is discoverable by researchers. Our literature review and environment scan suggest that while substantial effort is dedicated to structured descriptions of research data, unstructured fields are commonly available (title, description) yet poorly understood. There is no clear description of what information should be included, in what level of detail, and in what order. These human-readable fields, routinely used in indexing and search features and reliably federated, are essential to the research data user experience. We propose a set of high-level best practices for unstructured description of datasets, to serve as the essential starting point for more granular, discipline-specific guidance. We based these practices on extensive review of literature on research article abstracts; archival practice; experience in supporting research data management; and grey literature on data documentation. They were iteratively refined based on comments received in a webinar series with researchers, data curators, data repository managers, and librarians in Canada. We demonstrate the need for information research to more closely examine these unstructured fields and provide a foundation for a more detailed conversation.

 
8:00am - 9:30amMembership Committee Meeting
Location: Snowbird, 2nd Floor, Marriott
8:00am - 5:00pmPlacement Service
Location: Alta, 2nd Floor, Marriott
8:00am - 5:00pmPlacement Service
Location: Canyons, 2nd Floor, Marriott
9:30am - 10:00amCoffee Break
Location: Ballroom Prefunction, Lobby Level, Marriott
9:30am - 4:00pmExhibits
Location: Ballroom Prefunction, Lobby Level, Marriott
10:00am - 11:30amExpanding Our Conceptions of Embodied and Affective Information Interactions with Queer Theory
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 210 / [Single Presentation of ID 210]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Theory
Keywords: embodiment; affect; queer; information interactions; theory

Diana Floegel1, Travis Wagner2, Daniel Delmonaco3, B.M. Watson4

1Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, USA; 2University of South Carolina, USA; 3University of Michigan, USA; 4University of British Columbia, Canada

Embodiment and affect are understudied in information science work to date. Literature that engages with embodied information interactions typically focuses on physical bodies, while work on affect largely centers people’s emotional experiences in formal knowledge institutions like libraries. Room therefore exists to grow in our understanding of embodiment and affect, particularly in terms of theorizing how bodies and feelings factor into a wide range of information experiences from non-dominant standpoints. This panel centers queer experiences and queer theory in order to expand conceptions of and connections between embodied and affective dimensions of information interactions. Panelists will present a range of research that examines queer people’s practices and experiences with information in historical, archival, creative, and health-related domains. Bodies and emotions are essential components of critical queer theoretical perspectives, meaning that scholarship which centers queerness and its intersections with constructs like race has great potential to expand many branches of information science further beyond their normative bents. In concert, topics discussed should spark conversation among attendees about the theoretical and practical benefits of deeply studying embodiment and affect and further utilizing critical theory in multiple domains within the information science discipline.

 
10:00am - 11:30amPaper Session 11: Health Information Behavior
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Yung-Sheng Chang, The University of Texas at Austin, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
10:00am - 10:30am
ID: 142 / PS-11: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Health information; Health behavior change; Trust; TPB; SEM; TTM

Exploring the Effect of Rational Factors and Trust in Health Behavior Change

Jiaqi Deng1, Shijuan Li2, Preben Hansen3

1SUN Yat-Sen University, People's Republic of China; 2Peking University, People's Republic of China; 3Stockholm University, Sweden

This study examines how rational factors and trust modify health behaviors and various stages of trust mediate the rational factors in behavior changing through four stages of it. By integrating factors of TPB and various stages of trust, a health behavior change framework was proposed. Quantitative data on TPB, trust and behavior change were collected from Chinese youths through online survey. SEM was applied to analyze the data from 448 valid questionnaires to verify it. The findings show: Both TPB and trust constructs have significant impacts on modifying health behavior change; Trust mediates the effect of perceived behavioral control on health behavior change, while the stages of site content evaluation and longer-term engagement of trust act as partial mediators; Relationships existed between TPB factors and trust stages. This study advances the understanding of health behavior change with regards to rational factors and trust stages and provides implications for stakeholders.



10:30am - 11:00am
ID: 227 / PS-11: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Surrogates’ health information seeking, Online health information, Information source, Information evaluation, Information sharing

Predicting Surrogates’ Health Information Seeking Behavior via Information Source and Information Evaluation

Yung-Sheng Chang, Yan Zhang, Jacek Gwizdka

The University of Texas at Austin, USA

This study investigates surrogates’ health information sharing behavior through information sources and information evaluation. A lab-based experiment was conducted. Twenty-five participants read five scenarios, each with three preselected webpages from a government, a commercial, and an online forum source. Participants had to decide whether to share the information with an imaginary friend of theirs and provide rationales (an indication of information evaluation). Content analysis and mixed effects logistic regression models were performed. Government websites were recommended for sharing the most, followed by commercial and online forum sources. Criteria predicting participants’ intention to share information were different for each information source. The content’s usefulness and trustworthiness were two criteria predicting participants’ intention to share commercial websites. Source’s trustworthiness and individual relevant criterion were two significant predictors for government sources. Source’s trustworthiness had negative effects on sharing information from online forums. 13.3% of the information evaluation involved using both positive and negative criteria.



11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 100 / PS-11: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Information seeking; information avoidance; cancer patients; interviews; selective exposure and avoidance

Avoiding Information During Serious Illness: Insights into the Information Behavior of Cancer Patients

Jesper Gabs Jensen, Emil Petersen, Tove Faber Frandsen

University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

Cancer patients seek information about their health and illness using many different approaches. Some prefer to seek intensively whereas other avoid seeking information. Over the course of the cancer continuum an individual may meet their needs using several different approaches. In this paper, we explore how avoidance can be an approach used as part of information seeking activities and not just as an alternative approach. Interviews with six current and former cancer patients were conducted and analyzed. We identify the different patterns of information seeking among the interviewees ranging from seeking intensively to avoiding information. Furthermore, we find that exposing yourself selectively to information as well as avoiding some information can be strategies to protect the information seeker from information the individual is not able to cope with. This study indicates that the information seeking approaches are overlapping.

 
10:00am - 11:30amHistory and Heritage Update (SIG-HFIS and SIG-STI)
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 131 / [Single Presentation of ID 131]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Heritage, Humanities, Information history, Information Science, Curator’s Working Group

Robert Montoya1, Deanna Morrow Hall2, Michael Buckland3, Paul Daguid3

1University of California, Los Angeles, USA; 2Corporate Information Resources, Inc., USA; 3University of California, Berkeley, USA

Major new developments in the history and heritage of ASIS&T and of information science generally are presented. First, the progress of the ASIS&T Curator’s Working Group’s strategic plan for ASIST’s knowledge management and for stewardship of its heritage resources will be presented by Deanna Hall, the ASIS&T Curator. Second, the ambitious program of the ASIS&T History Committee to encourage attention to historical work by promoting open access to past publications and the creation of guides to resources will be reported by the Committee chair, Michael Buckland. Third, the emergence of extensive humanities research on information history, newly summarized in new encyclopedic collection Information: a historical companion (2021), will be introduced and characterized by Paul Duguid, a contributor and co-editor.

 
10:00am - 11:30amInformation Injustice and Intellectual Freedom: Polarizing Concepts for a Polarizing Time
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 223 / [Single Presentation of ID 223]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Privacy and Ethics
Keywords: justice, intellectual freedom, information poverty, information marginalization, social inclusion

Shannon Oltmann1, Ana Ndumu2, Emily Knox3, John Burgess4

1University of Kentucky, USA; 2University of Maryland, USA; 3University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA; 4University of Alabama, USA

Historically, information professionals have advocated for intellectual freedom, specifically the rights to free speech and expression. The unrestricted flow of information has been foundational to library and information science practice. Yet, free speech at times is protected to the detriment of vulnerable communities. In this panel discussion, four library and information science researchers discuss the scholarly and pragmatic tensions surrounding LIS ethics and anti-hegemony. Using Chatman’s (1996) concept of information poverty and Gibson and Martin’s (2019) theory of information marginalization as discursive guides, the panelists will describe how they negotiate ethical principles, information justice, LIS professionalization, and social inclusion.

 
10:00am - 11:30amPaper Session 12: Information, Emotion, and Mood
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Nathan Davis, The University of Texas at Austin, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
10:00am - 10:15am
ID: 237 / PS-12: 1
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Information practice; information work; invisible work; archives; affective practice research

Archivists’ Information Work Lines: Affective, Information Management, and Hybrid Onsite-Remote Work Performance

Deborah Garwood, Alex Poole

Drexel University, USA

This paper is among the first to investigate information work concepts in the archival context. A qualitative case study, it relies on two rounds of semi-structured interviews with information professionals at medical history collections in Philadelphia. These interviews bracketed the six months before and after COVID-19’s onset. We analyze three lines of information work that evolved as these archivists shifted the work context to their home environments: affective effort, information management, and hybrid onsite-remote work performance. Findings suggest that tasks such as processing, digitizing, and curating resources (invisible pre-pandemic) and reference services (visible pre-pandemic) overlap in archivists’ hybrid onsite-remote work performance during the pandemic. In recognizing the links between archivists’ information work and work performance as a holistic approach to studies of the information-intensive archival context, this research has implications for the centrality of work context, purpose, and value in the archival context.



10:15am - 10:30am
ID: 104 / PS-12: 2
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Fiction Reading Behavior, Motivations for Reading, COVID-19, Readers’ Advisory

“I Don’t Want a Book That’s Going to Make me Sad or Stressed Out, Especially in This Day and Age”: Fiction Reading (and Healing) in a Pandemic

Hyerim Cho1, Wan-Chen Lee2, Alex Urban1, Li-Min {Cassandra} Huang3, Yi Long1

1University of Missouri, USA; 2University of Washington, USA; 3University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA

To understand the roles of fiction reading in mitigating readers’ stress during the COVID-19 pandemic, this study explores readers’ motivations, preferences, and reading behaviors. Through an open-ended online survey posted on social media platforms and an online reading community, the researchers collected 76 responses from adult fiction readers. Through qualitative coding, three prominent themes were identified: escapism, re-reading behavior, and access and format. Readers actively escape into fictional worlds, often through re-reading books, to cope with the pandemic. Also, cost and available channels of access shape readers' selection of fiction book format. These themes highlight elements of fiction reading that are pertinent to emotionally-strained individuals, which can provide insight for reference and recommendation services. By advancing researchers’ understanding of pleasure reading behaviors and the important selection criteria for fiction readers during stressful times, this study contributes to the body of knowledge in Readers Advisory (RA) and information behavior.



10:30am - 10:45am
ID: 225 / PS-12: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Ancient poetry; Theme; Cold environment; Emotional word recognition; BERT

Recognition and Analysis of Emotional Words in Ancient Chinese Poetry Under Different Themes

Wei Zhang1,2, Hao Wang1,2

1Nanjing University, People's Republic of China; 2Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Data Engineering and Knowledge Service, People's Republic of China

The emotional connotation in ancient poetry is a valuable human spiritual culture, adopting the key semantic technique to parse the emotional word in poetry under different themes is beneficial to discover the relationship between poetry theme and emotion. In a “cold environment” (without learning corpus) of Tang poetry, this work presents, for the first time, the automatic recognition and analysis of large-scale humanistic emotional words within ancient Chinese poetry from different themes. A “cold start” automatic citation method for character sequences is proposed to obtain the learning corpus. The best F1 and F1_distinct of trained BERT-BiLSTM-CRFs model respectively reach 96.27% and 86.04%. Deep learning expanded imagery words that convey emotion to realize knowledge discovery. The relationships between theme and emotion word show that Chinese poetry is good at using natural objects to express various sentiments to people, with each theme of poetry owns distinguished emotion feature.



10:45am - 11:15am
ID: 255 / PS-12: 4
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: leisure, information experience, document experience, diaspora

Information as Meaningful Experience

Priya Kizhakkethil

University of North Texas, USA

Leisure is seen as important in the settlement and acculturation experiences of immigrant and refugee populations as well as helping them in maintaining their cultural identity and ties to their homeland. The study covered by this paper looks at a virtual small world, converging around a leisure activity of fanfiction reading and writing from a gender and diaspora perspective, with an aim to understanding what is experienced as information within that context. Adopting a theoretical lens drawing on information and document experience literature, information was found to be experienced as everyday, as social ties, as awareness and as memories leading to a broad conceptualization of information as meaningful experience. The study also highlighted the important role played by the social context in these experiences of information, while underscoring the usefulness in adopting an experience approach, going beyond what has been the norm in the form of information seeking and problematic situations.

 
10:00am - 11:30amAwards & Honors Committee Meeting
Location: Snowbird, 2nd Floor, Marriott
10:30am - 6:00pmPoster Viewing All Day
Location: Room 250, First Level, Convention Center
11:45am - 1:45pmBusiness Meeting and Luncheon - All Are Welcome
Location: Salons D-E, Lobby Level, Marriott
2:00pm - 3:30pmData Discovery and Reuse in Data Service Practices: A Global Perspective
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 144 / [Single Presentation of ID 144]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Data discovery; Research data management; Data repositories; User interfaces

Ying-Hsang Liu1, Hsin-liang {Oliver} Chen2, Makoto Kato3, Mingfang Wu4, Kathleen Gregory5,6,7

1University of Southern Denmark, Denmark; 2Missouri University of Science and Technology, USA; 3University of Tsukuba, Japan; 4Australian Research Data Commons, Australia; 5University of Ottawa, Canada; 6Scholarly Communications Lab, Ottawa/Vancouver, Canada; 7Data Archiving and Networked Services, Netherlands

The proposed panel will address the issues of the discovery and reuse of publicly available data on the web in the context of data service practices from a global perspective. Thousands of data discovery services have appeared around the world since the promotion of ‘open science’, reproducible research, and the FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) data principles in the research sector. However, there is also increasing demand for transparency of search algorithms, and in the design, development, evaluation, and deployment of current data search services; this requires a better understanding of how users approach data discovery and interact with data in search settings. From a global perspective, we will identify and discuss the specific system design issues in data discovery and reuse, drawing on our organization of the NTCIR (NII Testbeds and Community for Information access Research) project of Data Search track, the design and evaluation of the data discovery service of the Australian Research Data Commons (ARDC), and studies examining researchers’ practices of data discovery and reuse.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmApplying Research in Industry: Methods, Theories, Approaches and How They Shape Practice
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Sandra Hirsh, San Jose State University, USA
Session Chair: Don Turnbull, Aqua M&A, USA
 
ID: 348 / [Single Presentation of ID 348]: 1
Industry Panel
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Research Methods
Keywords: industry

Sam Ladner1, Laurentia Romaniuk2, Christine Anderson3

1Workday, USA; 2Instacart, USA; 3The Trade Desk, USA

This panel invites industry leaders to discuss how they apply their research skills and experiences to industry work to address practical problems. Panelists will review and highlight their own observations on best practice approaches to doing practical research and identify how research shapes and informs their work. They will also discuss trends, challenges, and opportunities for collaboration between industry and academia.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmUpdates of Information Standards and Standardization Efforts (ASIS&T Standards Committee)
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 268 / [Single Presentation of ID 268]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: data standards, information standards, open data, knowledge organization systems

Mark Needleman1, Marjorie Hlava2, Marcia Zeng3, Timothy Dickey3

1Florida Center for Library Automation, USA; 2Access Innovations, USA; 3Kent State University, USA

This panel, sponsored by the ASIS&T Standards Committee, has two purposes. First, the panel reports the most recent activities of the national and international standards in the field of information science and technologies in which the ASIS&T Standards Committee and members have been involved. Second, the panel will focus on a number of significant standardization efforts, their important roles, and the challenges in dealing with semantic conflicts while addressing inclusion and relevance to ensure non-bias in information representation and the FAIRness of data. Those efforts have led to the globally adopted standard systems, vocabularies, and schemas, which will be introduced by this panel.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmSearch a Great Leveler? Ensuring More Equitable Information Acquisition
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 153 / [Single Presentation of ID 153]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Information equity, information acquisition, search, design

Stephann Makri1, Dana McKay6, George Buchanan2, Shanton Chang2, Dirk Lewandowski3, Andy MacFarlane1, Lynne Cole1, Sanne Vrijenhoek4, Andrés Ferraro5

1City, University of London, UK; 2Universit of Melbourne, Australia; 3Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Germany; 4University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; 5Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain; 6RMIT, Australia

The ubiquitous search box promised to democratize knowledge access by making information universally accessible. But while many search engines cater well for certain user groups, information tasks and content types, they cater poorly for others. Poorly-served users include those with certain types of impairment (e.g. dyslexia), and weakly-supported tasks include highly exploratory goals, where it can be difficult to express information needed as a query. Furthermore, the overdominance of search functionality in many information environments has restricted support for other important forms of information acquisition, such as serendipitous information encountering and creative ‘inspiration hunting.’ Search results and recommendations can also promote certain types of content due to algorithmic bias. Rather than act as a great leveler by making information acquisition effective, efficient and enjoyable for all, search engines often unfairly favor some types of user, task or content over others. In short, search is not always equitable. This panel discussion will elucidate the inequity of search as an information acquisition paradigm from multiple perspectives and propose design principles to ensure more equitable information acquisition.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmPaper Session 13: Information and Social Issues
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: John Budd, University of Missouri, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
2:00pm - 2:15pm
ID: 157 / PS-13: 1
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: 2021 Atlanta Spa Shootings, Anti-Asian Hate, Social Media Archive, Social Movement Archive, Twitter

#StopAsianHate: Archiving and Analyzing Twitter Discourse in the Wake of the 2021 Atlanta Spa Shootings

Lizhou Fan, Huizi Yu, Anne Gilliland

University of California, Los Angeles, USA

On March 16, 2021, six Asian women were killed in Atlanta, US, possibly out of racist motivations. This tragic event, now known as the 2021 Atlanta Spa Shootings, precipitated a massive increase in the volume of counter-anti-Asian declarations and discussion on social media platforms such as Twitter. In a pilot study to chronicle and profile public opinions, social movements and patterns in the global Twitter discourse we scraped the Twitter API using the query term “StopAsianHate”, obtaining more than 5.5 million tweets and their metadata. By using social movement analytical frameworks to analyze traffic peaks and the use of hashtags, we identified a set of more than 300 frequently used hashtags that can serve as specific query words in future archival ingest activities, as well as the dimensions of and current problems with this social movement. This suggests the utility of this approach for both archiving applications and social-political analyses of emerging topics and concerns.



2:15pm - 2:30pm
ID: 121 / PS-13: 2
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Content moderation, hate speech classification, political discussion, YouTube comment, political orientation

Content Moderation of Speech in Political Discussions

Yisi Sang, Lizhen Liang, Jeffrey Stanton

Syracuse University, USA

Social media platforms have been hailed as “politically disruptive communication technologies'' (Hong & Nadler, 2012). Individuals express opinions and engage with politicians, the press, and each other on social media, sometimes using offensive language (Rossini et al., 2020). Content moderation has been adopted by many social media platforms to screen and evaluate offensive speech. In the present study we trained offensive speech classifiers to analyze offensive speech examples by integrating three archival datasets. We then used the trained classifier to examine a large body of comments about YouTube videos posted during the 2018 midterm election cycle. This provided information on the prevalence of various kinds of offensive comments and the pattern of content moderation used by YouTube. We also examined comment negativity using data from offensive speech lexicons. Our results showed systematic variance in the prevalence of speech topics depending upon the political orientation of the content. Language use was significantly different between left and right-leaning videos for comments related to sexism.



2:30pm - 3:00pm
ID: 287 / PS-13: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Chinesevirus; Twitter; COVID-19; xenophobia; racist hashtag

Racist Framing through Stigmatized Naming: A Topical and Geo-locational Analysis of #Chinavirus and #Chinesevirus on Twitter

Miyoung Chong1, Haihua Chen2

1University of Virginia, USA; 2University of North Texas, USA

During the COVID-19 pandemic, racists remarks accompanied by racist hashtags were disseminated via social media. Particularly, Asian Americans in the U.S. have been suffered from racism and xenophobia resulting in physical violence and mental harassment in many cases. Despite the major function of the social media as an open access platform for unedited and free speech for people with diverse background, the global episodes of the soaring racism and xenophobia occurred in online public arenas reaffirmed that the platforms could be used for a nurturing ground of racism and xenophobia. This study examined the top influencers in the racist hashtag Twitter network and top shared neighboring hashtags with #Chinavirus or #Chinesevirus. We extracted topics from the racist hashtag Twitter network applying the state-of-the-art BERTopic modeling technique and conducted a geo-locational analysis of the participants of the network globally and by U.S. states. Trump was identified as the most influential actor in the #Chinavirus and #Chinesevirus Twitter network. This study confirmed previous literature that political elite’s public communication strategy to deviate the attention of the public suffered from the new disease and went through hardships under the epidemic crisis.



3:00pm - 3:15pm
ID: 243 / PS-13: 4
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Body-worn cameras, surveillance, policing, information politics, visual evidence

Interpreting Police Video: A Pilot Study

Bryce Newell

University of Oregon, USA

The visual records police body-worn cameras (BWCs) produce are frequently characterized as presenting more complete, comprehensive, and objective evidence of police-public encounters than other forms of evidence. Despite a growing body of research on the social impacts of BWCs, we still lack a rich understanding of what information these technologies provide viewers. This ongoing exploratory project examines how people interpret what they see in BWC footage and what judgments they make about the appropriateness of depicted police conduct. Drawing from interviews with twelve students and twelve sworn police officers, I present initial exploratory findings. Participants viewed BWC video of a police-public contact in which an officer stops a man on a sidewalk to question him, resulting in a foot chase and, ultimately, an arrest. When asked whether the officer’s behavior was justified, police officer participants were more likely to focus on things like police training, procedure, and legality to justify the officer’s action, while student participants were more likely to focus on the officer’s demeanor, reporting that he should have been calmer and may have escalated the situation by not explaining clearly why he had initiated the stop.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmHistory Committee Meeting
Location: Snowbird, 2nd Floor, Marriott
3:30pm - 4:00pmCoffee Break
Location: Ballroom Prefunction, Lobby Level, Marriott
4:00pm - 5:30pmPaper Session 14: User Engagement and Experience
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Janette Klein, University of North Texas, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
4:00pm - 4:15pm
ID: 117 / PS-14: 1
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Social media image, User engagement, Machine learning, Regression analysis

Image Position and Layout Effects on User Engagement of Multi-Image Tweets

Xiaoyue Ma, Xiao Meng

Xi'an Jiaotong University, People's Republic of China

Current researches paid less attention to the image position and layout of tweets containing multiple images. Inspired by the research on user cognition, this study explored the impact of image position and layout on user engagement. The XGBoost model trained on single-image tweet data was used to predict the "user engagement potential" of a single image in multi-image tweets. Then, the influence of image position and layout on user engagement was analyzed through correlation analysis and OLS regression. It was found that the right position was more important in tweets with less than or equal to 4 images, and the position effects became symmetric with image adding. Layouts with 6 and 4 images had positive effects on user engagement, while layouts with 7 and 9 or more images had negative effects. This study provides insights into user engagement with social media images and may help improve interaction.



4:15pm - 4:45pm
ID: 193 / PS-14: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Human-computer interaction, subjective workload, gaze fixation, user-interface design, systematic review

A Mixed-Method Usability Study on User Experience with Systematic Review Software

Manhua Wang1,2, Selina Sharmin1, Mengqian Wang1, Fei Yu1

1University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA; 2Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, USA

Systematic reviews are widely used in evidence-based medicine. Conducting a systematic review requires intensive mental efforts, especially during the study screening process. This challenge has motivated the development of intelligent software. This study examined and compared the performance, workload, and user experience of two systematic review tools – Colandr with AI features and Covidence without AI features by conducting a mixed-method usability study. The results showed that, compared with Covidence, Colandr helped reviewers with higher precision in citation screening. However, the user experience with Colandr was not optimal due to problems in its user interface design. Therefore, we suggest that the design and development of AI-enabled SR software emphasize the usability of the interface and apply user-centered design principles.



4:45pm - 5:15pm
ID: 111 / PS-14: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Chinese painting and calligraphy, Digital archives search system, Information search process, Meaning making process, Search as learning

Learning Outcomes During Information Search in Digital Archives

I-Chin Wu1, Pertti Vakkari2, Bo-Xian Huang1

1National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan; 2Tampere University, Finland

A museum’s digital archive system gathers information about cultural heritage and makes it accessible to the public. In this study we clarify the extent to which search behaviors reflect task outcome and foster users’ knowledge of painting and calligraphy. Ten users participated in this evaluation of the Digital Archives of Chinese Painting and Calligraphy Search System (DA-PCSS) of the National Palace Museum in Taiwan. Participants’ search activities and interactions with the DA-PCSS were recorded in two simulated tasks. The results show that participants who received high scores for their essays on the tasks formulated precise queries: instead of general terms they used precise expressions describing features in paintings and calligraphy. In addition, they were able to seek out sources to explore the topics. For such participants, a meaning-making process seems to have occurred during the search process. Our results suggest that the criteria for learning at various stages of search suggested by Vakkari (2016) seem to validly reflect the quality of the search outcomes. In all, the results elucidate how the evaluated system supports users as they search for target items, as well as how learning occurs during the search process and in turn influences task outcomes.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmPaper Session 15: Infrastructure and Inequality
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Elliott Hauser, The University of Texas at Austin, USA
 
4:00pm - 4:30pm
ID: 233 / PS-15: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: peer review, publishing, discrimination

Ethnic Disparities in Publishing in Top Scientific Journals

Hao Peng1, Karim Lakhani2, Misha Teplitskiy1

1University of Michigan, USA; 2Harvard University, USA

Publishing in top journals is crucial for academic careers, but not all authors are equally successful in getting their papers accepted. Here, we examine ethnic disparities in publishing success using the peer review data of 31,779 manuscripts submitted between 2013-2018 to two biology journals, one field-leading (Journal A) and one middle-tier (Journal B). The data include accepted and rejected submissions, their peer reviews and citation trajectories, and author ethnicities determined via a name-based classifier. We find that overall, authors with minority-ethnicity names had significantly lower acceptance rates at both journals than those with British-origin names. However, for most ethnicities, these disparities are reduced or disappear when accounting for post-publication citation impact. Nevertheless, at Journal A, for a given level of future impact and other paper characteristics, editors were (i) less likely to send East Asian-authored papers out for peer review, and after receiving reviews, for a given level of peer reviewer enthusiasm (ii) less likely to ultimately accept them. In contrast to editors, Journal A’s peer reviewers gave recommendations that were similar across all ethnic groups. As submissions to top journals increasingly come from all over the globe, these findings signal the need to better understand editors’ decision-making.



4:30pm - 5:00pm
ID: 203 / PS-15: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Knowledge infrastructures; homelessness; VI-SPDAT; infrastructural justice; critical infrastructure studies

Just Infrastructure? Field Research on a Standardized Assessment Tool for a Continuum of Care for People Experiencing Homelessness

Stephen Slota1, Kenneth Fleischmann1, Sherri Greenberg1, Michelle Surka1, Keyanna Evans1, James Snow2, Sarah Rodriguez3, Tara Zimmerman1

1The University of Texas at Austin, USA; 2City of Austin: Public Works Department, USA; 3City of Austin: Office of Design and Delivery, USA

As community-oriented programs move from intervention to infrastructure, questions of just and equitable access to that infrastructure both arise and become more consequential to those served. However, extant tools are general in scope, often undertested, and inconsistently linked with positive outcomes for served communities and service providers. We explore the dynamics and implications of a key tool within this infrastructure intended to enable portable collaboration across organizations serving those who are experiencing homelessness: the VI-SPDAT (Vulnerability Index - Service Prioritization Decision Assistance Tool). This tool, while providing a means of coordinated assessment, must itself be negotiated according to the values, data concerns, and goals of the agencies and service providers who make use of it. This paper reports findings from 29 interviews with individuals working in nonprofits, charities, and government agencies that provide services or resources to people experiencing homelessness within the City of Austin’s Continuum of Care. The life-and-death stakes of the VI-SPDAT, which is designed to prioritize access to services based in part on a prediction of potential for premature mortality, drive home the need for equitable and just infrastructure.



5:00pm - 5:30pm
ID: 241 / PS-15: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Digital inequality; COVID-19 pandemic; K-12 education; crisis and critical informatics; e-learning technology

Social and Digital Inequality as Factors in K-12 Emergency Remote Teaching and Learning in the Pandemic of 2020: Educator Perspectives

Rebecca Reynolds, Julie Aromi, Catherine McGowan, Britt Paris

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, USA

The rapid deployment of emergency remote teaching in the pandemic presents sweeping societal-level information systems phenomena worthy of scholarly inquiry. This paper reports findings from teacher interviews conducted with K-12 public school teachers, exploring how digital access and use gaps in communities reflect social inequalities as schools become swept up into e-learning technology expansion trends propelled by district and state imperatives. Results show persistence of home and school level digital affordance gaps as hindrances to pandemic pedagogy. We build upon crisis and critical informatics literature considering how theories in socio-technical systems research can inform these understandings, providing insights into the mutually reflecting and reinforcing role of digital inequality and social inequality, via the educative processes expected of public education in democratic societies, if current trends hold. Our work demonstrates some of the ways in which digital inequality gaps may play a further magnifying role of societal division through expanding edtech deployment in K-12 grades.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmFoundations of Information Science (SIG-HFIS, SIG-ED, and SIG-STI)
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 129 / [Single Presentation of ID 129]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Theory
Keywords: China; context, foundations, information science, information seeking.

Michael Buckland1, Marcia Bates2, Wayne de Fremery3, Lin Wang4

1University of California, Berkeley, USA; 2University of California, Los Angeles, USA; 3Sogang University, Korea; 4Hangzhou Dianzi University, People's Republic of China

The foundations of information science define our field and, thereby, our professional identity. It follows that if our our professional identity is to be equitable, diverse, inclusive, and relevant, then the foundations of our field should also be. Three diverse contributions to the foundations of information science will illustrate diverse approaches to making information science more inclusive will be illustrated by experienced panelists with different backgrounds: Recuperating neglected work; exploring alternative methods; and drawing attention to undocumented work. Marcia Bates will revisit early work on information seeking. Michael Buckland and Wayne de Fremery will demonstrate an alternative approach to the problematic concept of “context.” Lin Wang will introduce aspects of the early history of information science in China.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmAt the Margins of Epistemology: Amplifying Alternative Ways of Knowing in Library and Information Science
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 228 / [Single Presentation of ID 228]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Epistemology, epistemicide, and epistemic injustice; equity, diversity, inclusion and justice; data, information, and knowledge; library and information science; paradigm shift

Beth Patin1, Tami Oliphant2, Danille Allard2, LaVerne Gray1, Rachel Clarke1, Jasmina Tacheva1, Kayla Lar-Son3

1Syracuse University, USA; 2University of Alberta, Canada; 3University of British Columbia, Canada

This panel argues a paradigm shift is needed in library and information science (LIS) to move the field toward information equity, inclusion, relevance, diversity, and justice. LIS has undermined knowledge systems falling outside of Western traditions. While the foundations of LIS are based on epistemological concerns, the field has neglected to treat people as epistemic agents who are embedded in cultures, social relations and identities, and knowledge systems that inform and shape their interactions with data, information, and knowledge as well as our perceptions of each other as knowers. To achieve this shift we examine epistemicide --the killing, silencing, annihilation, or devaluing of a knowledge system, epistemic injustice and a critique of the user-centered paradigm. We present alternative epistemologies for LIS: critical consciousness, Black feminism, and design epistemology and discuss these in practice: community generated knowledges as sites of resistance and Indigenous data sovereignty and the “right to know”.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmCareer Development in Knowledge Management (SIG-KM)
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 128 / [Single Presentation of ID 128]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: workforce, networking, knowledge management, faculty mentoring, peer mentoring

Jeff Allen1, Lu An2, Darra Hofman3, Md. Anwarul Islam4, Heather Pfeiffer5

1University of North Texas, USA; 2Wuhan University, People's Republic of China; 3San Jose State University, USA; 4University of Dhaka, Bangladesh; 5New Mexico State University, USA

This is a SIG-KM sponsored panel presented by members of the SIG-KM officer team. First, the panel will overview their experience in knowledge management (KM) as scholars and scholar-practitioners. They will briefly discuss their career development successes and hurdles as a roadmap for others to follow. Second, the panel will discuss career pathways for KM scholars and scholar-practitioners in a global knowledge economy. Finally, they will hold an open discussion with audience members to share their experiences, expectations and hopes for the KM and the broader field of information science.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmStandards Committee Meeting
Location: Snowbird, 2nd Floor, Marriott
6:00pm - 7:30pmPresident's Reception with Posters (Sponsored by Wiley)
Location: Room 250, First Level, Convention Center