Conference Agenda (All times are shown in Mountain Daylight Time)

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Session
Paper Session 20: Designing for Humanities Researchers
Time:
Tuesday, 02/Nov/2021:
11:00am - 12:30pm

Session Chair: Maria Bonn, School of Information Sciences, univesity of Illinois Urbana Champaign, USA
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott


As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.


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Presentations
11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 254 / PS-20: 1
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Sustainability; digital preservation; digital community archives; digital humanities; cultural heritage

“Meaning in the Present”: Understanding Sustainability for Digital Community Collections

Katrina Fenlon, Jessica Grimmer, Alia Fatima Reza, Courtnie Thurston

University of Maryland, USA

Living independently of mainstream institutions, digital community archives and digital humanities collections confront systemic barriers to medium- and long-term viability. Their sustainability tends to be undermined by shifts in technologies, resources, and communities over time. Because these collections contain irreplaceable and invaluable evidence of communities and histories that are underrepresented in cultural institutions, their fragility compromises the completeness and equity of our collective digital heritage. Partnerships between institutions and community-based collections often founder over a lack of shared understanding: of the expertise each partner brings to the table, of the scope and extent of mutual commitments, and of what sustainability even entails for a given project. This paper reports preliminary outcomes of a case study of the Lakeland Digital Archive, exploring how Lakeland’s community understands sustainability in the context of their digital archive, as part of a broader study of community-centered sustainability strategies for digital collections.



11:15am - 11:45am
ID: 239 / PS-20: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Archives; Human Information Interaction; information use; knowledge creation

From Information to Knowledge Creation in the Archive: Observing Humanities Researchers’ Information Activities

Alexandra Leigh1,2, Stephann Makri1, Alex Taylor1, Alec Mulinder2, Sarra Hamdi2

1City, University of London, UK; 2The National Archives, UK

As primary sources, archival records are a unique information source at the very heart of humanities research. However, how humanities researchers move from information to knowledge creation by making meaning from archival records has not been the focus of previous empirical research. This is surprising, as creating new knowledge through (re)interpretation of records is a core motivation and outcome of humanities research; as representations of historical and social occurrences, archival records rely on researchers’ interpretation of content, context, and structure to establish an ‘archival’ meaning of the record, before applying this meaning within their own work. Therefore, constructing knowledge from archival materials necessitates a dual process of knowledge creation to create novel insights from a hybrid interpretation of archival meaning and the researcher’s own interests. This paper presents findings from a naturalistic empirical observation of 11 humanities researchers engaging in research at a national archive, centring on key information activities that facilitate knowledge creation from archival records: Scanning, Relating, Capturing and Organising. Through these activities, scholars integrate their research aims and objectives with archival meaning to generate new insights. Deeper understanding of the nature of knowledge creation in archives can benefit archivists, archive users and systems designers alike.



11:45am - 12:00pm
ID: 122 / PS-20: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: digital humanities; usability testing; user experience; participatory design

Perceived Usability and Experience with Digital Tools in the Context of Digital Humanities Research

Jesse Du, Chris Yuen, Micah Slaughter, Annie Chen

University of Washington, USA

This paper examines differences in the user feedback of scholars with varied experience with digital tools. As part of a usability study of a historical digital collection, our team conducted semi-structured interviews with scholars with varying backgrounds. We categorized the sample into two groups, one with significant experience and one with little experience in using digital technology. Qualitative analysis of the interview data showed that users generally provided similar feedback. However, there were instances in which those with significant experience provided more design suggestions, and those with less experience expressed confusion and provided more feedback on website content. Drawing upon our findings, we provide recommendations for the usability evaluation of historical digital collections.



12:00pm - 12:15pm
ID: 169 / PS-20: 4
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Digital humanities; visualization; semi-structured interviews; research data curation

What is a Good Visualization for Digital Humanities Researchers? An Exploratory Study

Rongqian Ma, Fanghui Xiao

University of Pittsburgh, USA

Visualization in digital humanities (DH) has developed into a charged topic as increasing numbers of humanities researchers begin to work with machine-readable data. The current research literature on DH visualization has primarily approached the subject from a theoretical perspective, arguing the humanistic visualization should fundamentally differ from scientific visualization to represent the distinct nature of humanities data and inquiries. However, few studies have tried to empirically understand what it means to be a good visualization for humanities researchers and practitioners. This study aims to bridge this research gap by offering an exploratory investigation into researchers’ perceptions on visualization, particularly how they evaluate a visualization in humanities research. Through 10 semi-structured interviews with humanities scholars engaging in digital work, our study demonstrates that perceptions of a quality visualization among the humanities researchers are closely related to researchers’ purposes of using visualization and their self-confidence in visualization knowledge and skills. This study serves as a baseline for future empirical research on DH visualization and potentially informs the best practices for humanistic visualizations.