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Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Session
Paper Session 15: Infrastructure and Inequality
Time:
Monday, 01/Nov/2021:
4:00pm - 5:30pm

Session Chair: Elliott Hauser, The University of Texas at Austin, USA
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott


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Presentations
4:00pm - 4:30pm
ID: 233 / PS-15: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: peer review, publishing, discrimination

Ethnic Disparities in Publishing in Top Scientific Journals

Hao Peng1, Karim Lakhani2, Misha Teplitskiy1

1University of Michigan, USA; 2Harvard University, USA

Publishing in top journals is crucial for academic careers, but not all authors are equally successful in getting their papers accepted. Here, we examine ethnic disparities in publishing success using the peer review data of 31,779 manuscripts submitted between 2013-2018 to two biology journals, one field-leading (Journal A) and one middle-tier (Journal B). The data include accepted and rejected submissions, their peer reviews and citation trajectories, and author ethnicities determined via a name-based classifier. We find that overall, authors with minority-ethnicity names had significantly lower acceptance rates at both journals than those with British-origin names. However, for most ethnicities, these disparities are reduced or disappear when accounting for post-publication citation impact. Nevertheless, at Journal A, for a given level of future impact and other paper characteristics, editors were (i) less likely to send East Asian-authored papers out for peer review, and after receiving reviews, for a given level of peer reviewer enthusiasm (ii) less likely to ultimately accept them. In contrast to editors, Journal A’s peer reviewers gave recommendations that were similar across all ethnic groups. As submissions to top journals increasingly come from all over the globe, these findings signal the need to better understand editors’ decision-making.



4:30pm - 5:00pm
ID: 203 / PS-15: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Knowledge infrastructures; homelessness; VI-SPDAT; infrastructural justice; critical infrastructure studies

Just Infrastructure? Field Research on a Standardized Assessment Tool for a Continuum of Care for People Experiencing Homelessness

Stephen Slota1, Kenneth Fleischmann1, Sherri Greenberg1, Michelle Surka1, Keyanna Evans1, James Snow2, Sarah Rodriguez3, Tara Zimmerman1

1The University of Texas at Austin, USA; 2City of Austin: Public Works Department, USA; 3City of Austin: Office of Design and Delivery, USA

As community-oriented programs move from intervention to infrastructure, questions of just and equitable access to that infrastructure both arise and become more consequential to those served. However, extant tools are general in scope, often undertested, and inconsistently linked with positive outcomes for served communities and service providers. We explore the dynamics and implications of a key tool within this infrastructure intended to enable portable collaboration across organizations serving those who are experiencing homelessness: the VI-SPDAT (Vulnerability Index - Service Prioritization Decision Assistance Tool). This tool, while providing a means of coordinated assessment, must itself be negotiated according to the values, data concerns, and goals of the agencies and service providers who make use of it. This paper reports findings from 29 interviews with individuals working in nonprofits, charities, and government agencies that provide services or resources to people experiencing homelessness within the City of Austin’s Continuum of Care. The life-and-death stakes of the VI-SPDAT, which is designed to prioritize access to services based in part on a prediction of potential for premature mortality, drive home the need for equitable and just infrastructure.



5:00pm - 5:30pm
ID: 241 / PS-15: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Digital inequality; COVID-19 pandemic; K-12 education; crisis and critical informatics; e-learning technology

Social and Digital Inequality as Factors in K-12 Emergency Remote Teaching and Learning in the Pandemic of 2020: Educator Perspectives

Rebecca Reynolds, Julie Aromi, Catherine McGowan, Britt Paris

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, USA

The rapid deployment of emergency remote teaching in the pandemic presents sweeping societal-level information systems phenomena worthy of scholarly inquiry. This paper reports findings from teacher interviews conducted with K-12 public school teachers, exploring how digital access and use gaps in communities reflect social inequalities as schools become swept up into e-learning technology expansion trends propelled by district and state imperatives. Results show persistence of home and school level digital affordance gaps as hindrances to pandemic pedagogy. We build upon crisis and critical informatics literature considering how theories in socio-technical systems research can inform these understandings, providing insights into the mutually reflecting and reinforcing role of digital inequality and social inequality, via the educative processes expected of public education in democratic societies, if current trends hold. Our work demonstrates some of the ways in which digital inequality gaps may play a further magnifying role of societal division through expanding edtech deployment in K-12 grades.