Conference Agenda (All times are shown in Mountain Daylight Time)

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Session
Paper Session 04: Transformation, Pedagogy, and Information Literacy
Time:
Sunday, 31/Oct/2021:
2:00pm - 3:30pm

Session Chair: Miyoung Chong, University of Virginia, USA
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott


As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.


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Presentations
ID: 195 / PS-04: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Archival education; Library and Information Science education; ethics of care; online learning; pedagogy

“It Makes Me Sad”: Archival Pedagogy in a Time of Covid-19

Alex Poole1, Jane Zhang2

1Drexel University, USA; 2Catholic University of America, USA

Despite COVID-19’s devastating repercussions on higher education, scholars have yet to address its impact on Library and Information Science pedagogy. This exploratory qualitative case study centers on how archival educators weathered the onslaught of the pandemic. Drawing upon semistructured interviews with 31 archival educators and documentary evidence, this research addresses the sudden shift to online education; the concomitant loss of hands-on work opportunities and the workarounds educators developed; affectivity and an emergent ethics of pedagogical care among students and educators; and educators’ lessons learned from the pandemic and their future projections regarding archival education. This paper illuminates the evolving landscape of pedagogy and its attendant challenges preparing the next generation of archival professionals during an unprecedented period of duress.



ID: 196 / PS-04: 2
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Data science education; pedagogy; Library and Information Science; iSchools; data science

LEADING the Way: A New Model for Data Science Education

Alex Poole

Drexel University, USA

Addressing the data skills gap, namely the superabundance of data and the lack of human capital to exploit it, this paper argues that iSchools and Library and Information Science programs are ideal venues for data science education. It unpacks two case studies: the LIS Education and Data Science for the National Digital Platform (LEADS-4-NDP) project (2017-2019), and the LIS Education and Data Science-Integrated Network Group (LEADING) project (2020-2023). These IMLS-funded initiatives respond to four national digital platform challenges: LIS faculty prepared to teach data science and mentor the next generation of educators and practitioners, an underdeveloped pedagogical infrastructure, scattered and inconsistent data science education opportunities for students and current information professionals, and an immature data science network. LEADS and LEADING have made appreciable collaborative, interdisciplinary contributions to the data science education community; these projects comprise an essential part of the long-awaited and much-needed national digital platform.



2:00pm - 2:15pm
ID: 290 / PS-04: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Fourth Industrial Revolution
Keywords: Digital readiness, digital maturity, digital readiness assessment, digital transformation, Africa

Digital Readiness Assessment of Countries in Africa: A Case Study Research

Shimelis Assefa1, Abebe Rorissa2, Daniel Alemneh3

1University of Denver, USA; 2University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA; 3University of North Texas, USA

There is an increasing uptake of digital technologies across African countries. Public, private, and government services have adopted digital technologies to improve work processes, create jobs, and better service delivery. This short paper seeks to answer: 1) What is the current state of digital readiness in African countries? 2) Do existing digital readiness assessment tools and metrics help to assess the digital readiness of countries in Africa? Analysis of publicly available data from Cisco index of readiness score and Broadband speed ranking by cable.co.uk, reveal that: 1) African countries' digital readiness score is below the global average of 11.96, on a scale of 0 to 25 (except Tunisia with score of 12.05); and 2) African countries' broadband speed is below the global mean speed of 25Mbps (mean speed of 4.51 and 3.80 Mbps for sub-Saharan Africa and North Africa, respectively). Second, analysis of various assessment tools show that the existing metrics can't be used as is to diagnose and evaluate Africa's digital readiness. Instead factors such as infrastructure; last-mile connectivity to homes, schools, etc.; and skill gaps should be considered. This study shows the need for an appropriate assessment tools so countries in Africa prioritize efforts to embrace digital readiness.



2:15pm - 2:30pm
ID: 182 / PS-04: 4
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Tattoos; information; information behavior, personal information management.

Tattoos and Information: Mapping the Landscape of Tattoo Research

Maja Krtalic, Jennifer Campbell-Meier, Rachel Bell

Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

This paper is the initial discussion of a larger project Tattoo and Information, exploring tattoos as an information and communication phenomenon from multicultural perspectives and various use purposes. The overall purpose of the project is to provide insight into information seeking and experience in the context of tattoos in order to identify information literacy, visual literacy and cultural literacy skills as well as communications skills necessary for a successful tattoo experience in Aotearoa New Zealand. In this paper, we present findings from the literature review accompanied by preliminary insights from four interviews. The findings reflect thematic areas of research focusing on tattoos and gaps that exist. We used interviews to capture what topics emerge from tattoo narratives and whether they align with topics and gaps identified in the literature review. Based on the findings, we identify areas for future research.