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Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Session
Foundations of Information Science (SIG-HFIS, SIG-ED, and SIG-STI)
Time:
Monday, 01/Nov/2021:
4:00pm - 5:30pm

Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott


External Resource:
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Presentations
ID: 129 / [Single Presentation of ID 129]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Theory
Keywords: China; context, foundations, information science, information seeking.

Foundations of Information Science (SIG-HFIS, SIG-ED, and SIG-STI)

Michael Buckland1, Marcia Bates2, Wayne de Fremery3, Lin Wang4

1University of California, Berkeley, USA; 2University of California, Los Angeles, USA; 3Sogang University, Korea; 4Hangzhou Dianzi University, People's Republic of China

The foundations of information science define our field and, thereby, our professional identity. It follows that if our our professional identity is to be equitable, diverse, inclusive, and relevant, then the foundations of our field should also be. Three diverse contributions to the foundations of information science will illustrate diverse approaches to making information science more inclusive will be illustrated by experienced panelists with different backgrounds: Recuperating neglected work; exploring alternative methods; and drawing attention to undocumented work. Marcia Bates will revisit early work on information seeking. Michael Buckland and Wayne de Fremery will demonstrate an alternative approach to the problematic concept of “context.” Lin Wang will introduce aspects of the early history of information science in China.