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Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Session
Paper Session 22: Engagement and Representation, Online and Offline
Time:
Tuesday, 02/Nov/2021:
2:00pm - 3:30pm

Session Chair: Steven Hardin, Indiana State University, USA
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott

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Presentations
2:00pm - 2:30pm
ID: 130 / PS-22: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: personal archiving, social media, gender

Revisiting and Hiding Posts: Personal Archiving on Facebook

Benedict Olgado1,2, Ces Archae Buenavista1, Beatrice Tan1

1University of the Philippines, Philippines; 2University of California, Irvine, USA

Our exploratory quantitative research show that users consider Facebook as a personal archive even if they perceive the platform to be only moderately useful or stable. In this personal archive, users are likely to revisit old posts but are unlikely to repost them. They are likely to hide old posts but are unlikely to edit them. Unlike previous studies that assert gender differences on social media activities, we found that there are no statistically significant differences between users who self-identify as female and those who self-identify as male when it comes to revisiting, reposting, editing, or deleting old posts. Self-identifying females, however, were more likely to hide posts than males. Our study points to extending how we think of and practice archiving in personal ways on social media platforms, acknowledging that a new generation of users may possibly conceive of archiving differently given the sociotechnical systems they engage with and the nature of recordmaking practices they employ.



2:30pm - 3:00pm
ID: 163 / PS-22: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Information practices, Knowledge Wanghong, Online celebrity, Perceived attractiveness, Self-branding

Exploring the Perceived Attractiveness of Online Celebrities Who Sell Knowledge: A Self-Branding Perspective

Xiaoyu Chen, Alton Y.K. Chua

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Given the limited understanding of the attractiveness among online celebrities, this study explores the perceived attractiveness of “Knowledge Wanghong,” an emerging class of online celebrities who sell knowledge products in China. Drawing on the self-branding perspective, which argues that individuals may construct and manage their distinctive online image deliberately through various information practices, as the theoretical lens, we attempt to answer two questions: (1) What are the antecedents of the perceived attractiveness of Knowledge Wanghong? (2) How do Knowledge Wanghong make themselves attractive to users? From semi-structured interviews with 28 Knowledge Wanghong, we derive two findings. First, the antecedents of the perceived attractiveness include perceived professionalism, perceived familiarity, and perceived intimacy. Second, Knowledge Wanghong make themselves appealing to users in two ways: (1) they disclose personal and professional information to users; (2) they employ multiple approaches to interacting with users. This study sheds light on the perceived attractiveness of Knowledge Wanghong in terms of the antecedents and how it is achieved. Also, it provides a novel reference point for discussing the information practices of online celebrities in a global context.



3:00pm - 3:30pm
ID: 105 / PS-22: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: youth civic engagement; social network; digital citizenship; weak tie theory

Social Connections Matter: Online and Offline Civic Engagement Among College Students

Shihui Feng, Mengqian Li, Ola Erstad

University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

This research examines civic engagement from both online and offline perspectives using 371 samples collected from two universities in China. We aimed to explore the effects of college students’ social connections on their online and offline civic engagement using partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). We found that weak ties in college students’ civic discussion networks play a significant role in affecting both online and offline civic engagement. Additionally, students’ characteristics, such as academic year, leadership role, and party membership, are associated with offline civic engagement, but not with online civic engagement. Political efficacy was also found to be a significant factor affecting both online and offline civic engagement. This study examines the weak tie theory in the context of online and offline civic engagement, sheds light on underlying principles for engaging young adults in civic life in the digital era, and advocates the importance of developing a blended approach for engaging college students in civic engagement in both online and offline settings.



 
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