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Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Session
Paper Session 18: Information Interactions
Time:
Tuesday, 02/Nov/2021:
9:00am - 10:30am

Session Chair: Brian Detlor, McMaster University, Canada
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.


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Presentations
9:00am - 9:30am
ID: 220 / PS-18: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Theory
Keywords: Children and Youth, Information Interaction, Epistemology, Conceptual analysis

Youth Research Under the Microscope: A Conceptual Analysis of Youth Information Interaction Studies

Vanessa Figueiredo, Eric Meyers

University of British Columbia, Canada

Youth information interaction (YII) research has focused on challenges youth encounter when interacting with information across different contexts. Although these studies have been fundamental to outline youth information behaviour, the absence of YII theoretical frameworks might limit our approach to contemporary issues, such as the increased use of apps and mobile devices for information searching. This paper presents a conceptual analysis of studies conducted between 1997-2020 to explore predominant epistemological stances and cognitive frameworks in YII. The conceptual analysis generated five typologies operationalizing YII studies in seven categories: epistemological stance, knowledge assumption, cognitive framework, study type, study design, theoretical framework, study outcomes, and applications. The findings suggest that YII research have converged to empiricist and rationalist stances supporting exploratory approaches. These findings elicit the urgency for the development of theoretical frameworks that support the validity of YII phenomena with the purpose of developing a new agenda for YII research.



9:30am - 10:00am
ID: 275 / PS-18: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Privacy and Ethics
Keywords: COVID-19, Mobile Applications, Privacy Concerns, Privacy Protections.

COVID-19 Apps and Privacy Protections from Users’ Perspective

Tian Wang, Lin Guo, Masooda Bashir

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

As the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to be a global pandemic and challenge, there has been numerous efforts and actions from both government and private organizations towards keeping their community members healthy and safe. One of the approaches is to use mobile apps to trace contacts and update status of the infected individuals in an efficient and convenient way so that the spread of the virus can be minimized and contained. While these apps could offer many advantages, it also raises serious privacy concerns for many users and hence possibly refusing to adopt it. In this study, we aim to understand the privacy protections users’ want and the provisions under which they are willing to use COVID-19 apps. We believe our study results can provide guidance for policy makers and app developers on the design, deployment, and acceptability of the COVID-19 apps that can be widely adopted.



10:00am - 10:15am
ID: 152 / PS-18: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: personal information management; file management; file systems; human-computer interaction

How Big Are Peoples' Computer Files? File Size Distributions Among User-Managed Collections

Jesse Dinneen1, Ba Nguyen2

1Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany; 2Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Improving file management interfaces and optimising system performance requires current data about users’ digital collections and particularly about the file size distributions of such collections. However, prior works have examined only the sizes of system files and users’ work files in varied contexts, and there has been no such study since 2013; it therefore remains unclear how today’s file sizes are distributed, particularly personal files, and further if distributions differ among the major operating systems or common occupations. Here we examine such differences among 49 million files in 348 user collections. We find that the average file size has grown more than ten-fold since the mid-2000s, though most files are still under 8 MB, and that there are demographic and technological influences in the size distributions. We discuss the implications for user interfaces, system optimisation, and PIM research.



 
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