Conference Agenda (All times are shown in Mountain Daylight Time)

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
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Session Overview
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
Date: Sunday, 31/Oct/2021
11:00am - 12:30pmPaper Session 03: The intersection of AI, LIS, and Ethics
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Dania Bilal, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA
 
11:00am - 11:30am
ID: 165 / PS-03: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: libraries, surveillance, technology, liberation, critical

The Library/Surveillance Interface

Diana Floegel1, Philip Doty2

1Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, USA; 2The University of Texas at Austin, USA

Few topics are more often discussed than surveillance, particularly in the context of surveillance technologies that reflect structural inequities. There is space, however, to bring more discussion of surveillance tech into the library literature. At the same time, literature on digital surveillance and associated systems such as Big Data, surveillance capitalism, and platform capitalism often discuss these phenomena as if they are novel rather than iterations of long-standing inequitable circumstances. We propose that a dialogue between surveillance literature and critical library literature will benefit both areas: theories from the surveillance domain can strengthen examinations of structural oppression in libraries while theories from critical library literature can strengthen acknowledgment of surveillance techs’ historical roots. Moreover, overlap exists between concepts used in surveillance and library literature, including concerns about neutrality and classification practices. Therefore, after reviewing surveillance theories and their applicability to libraries, we demonstrate how these scholarly areas may strengthen each other, with three major consequences: (a) moving library literature beyond considerations of the panopticon in favor of the surveillant assemblage; (b) recognizing that surveillance tech is a hyper-visible form of historical oppression; and (c) acknowledging that the library ethos is critical to any fight for justice within information science.



11:30am - 11:45am
ID: 167 / PS-03: 2
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: AI literacy, AI learning and teaching, AI in education, AI ethics, AI literacy questionnaire

AI Literacy: Definition, Teaching, Evaluation, and Ethical Issues

Davy Tsz Kit Ng, Jac Ka Lok Leung, Kai Wah Samuel Chu, Maggie Shen Qiao

University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is at the top of the agenda for education leaders today in educating the next generation across the globe. However, public understanding of AI technologies and how to define AI literacy is under-explored. This vision poses upcoming challenges for our next generation to learn about AI. On this note, an exploratory review was conducted to conceptualize the newly emerging concept “AI literacy”, in search for a sound theoretical foundation to define, teach and evaluate AI literacy. Grounded in literature on 18 existing peer-reviewed articles, this review proposed four aspects (i.e, know and understand, use, evaluate, and ethical issues) for fostering AI literacy based on the adaptation of classic literacies. This study sheds light on the consolidated definition, teaching, and ethical concerns on AI literacy, establishing the groundwork for future research such as competency development and assessment criteria on AI literacy.



11:45am - 12:15pm
ID: 204 / PS-03: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: library and information science; artificial intelligence; foundations of information science; research methods

Not Quite ‘Ask a Librarian’: AI on the Nature, Value, and Future of LIS

Jesse Dinneen, Helen Bubinger

Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany

AI language models trained on Web data generate prose that reflects human knowledge and public sentiments, but can also contain novel insights and predictions. We asked the world’s best language model, GPT-3, fifteen difficult questions about the nature, value, and future of library and information science (LIS), topics that receive perennial attention from LIS scholars. We present highlights from its 45 different responses, which range from platitudes and caricatures to interesting perspectives and worrisome visions of the future, thus providing an LIS-tailored demonstration of the current performance of AI language models. We also reflect on the viability of using AI to forecast or generate research ideas in this way today. Finally, we have shared the full response log online for readers to consider and evaluate for themselves.



12:15pm - 12:30pm
ID: 110 / PS-03: 4
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Artificial Intelligence Education; Artificial Intelligence Ethics; Ethics Education; Pedagogy; Thematic Analysis

Five Motivating Concerns for AI Ethics Instruction

Mariah Knowles

University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA

Artificial Intelligence (AI) systems are embedded in institutions that are not diverse, that are inequitable, unjust, and exclusionary. How do we address the interface between AI systems and an unjust world, in service to human flourishing? One mechanism for addressing AI Ethics is AI Ethics Education: training those who will build, use, and/or be subject to AI systems to have clear moral reasoning, make responsible decisions, and take right actions. This paper presents, as part of a larger project, work on what AI Ethics instructors currently do and how they describe their motivating concerns. I find that although AI Ethics content and pedagogy is varied, there are some common motivating concerns particular to this kind of teaching, which may be useful in structuring future guidance for new AI Ethics teachers, evaluating existing pedagogy, guiding research on new pedagogies, and promoting discussion with the AI Ethics community.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmPaper Session 06: Repositories and Digital Collections: Infrastructure and Sustainability
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Johanna Cohoon, The University of Texas at Austin, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
2:00pm - 2:30pm
ID: 102 / PS-06: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Data infrastructures, Infrastructure characteristics, Platforms, Research data repositories, re3data.org

Understanding Research Data Repositories as Infrastructures

Ceilyn Boyd

Simmons University, USA

This study discusses the properties of research data repositories and explores metadata about 2,646 entries in the Registry of Research Data Repositories (re3data.org) to identify the characteristics attributed to infrastructures they exhibit. The results reveal how research data repositories function as information infrastructure for scientific community members and contribute to the small body of literature that examines data repositories through a socio-technical lens.



2:30pm - 2:45pm
ID: 107 / PS-06: 2
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: research data management, archives, policies, decision-making, research support

Policies, Procedures, and Decision-Making: Data Managers and the Research Lifecycle

Anthony Million1, Jenny Bossaller2

1University of Michigan, USA; 2University of Missouri, USA

Research data is an asset. Researchers may be required to provide access to their data by scientific funders or aca-demic journals and deposit their data in archives. Managers of archives are guided by principles, policies, and the law when curating and providing access to data. Practices around data storage and access, however, are not always cut and dry; research data managers sometimes need to interpret policies. This paper presents findings from qualita-tive interviews with 15 data managers from 8 repositories in the U.S. These repositories were all affiliated with uni-versities but served varied constituents and provided a range of services. Differences revealed opportunities and chal-lenges in managing data repositories regarding, for instance, who can access data and the level of protection data requires. We also found that data-related policy challenges may stem from any stage of the research lifecycle.



2:45pm - 3:00pm
ID: 179 / PS-06: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Trustworthy Digital Repositories, Societal Impact, Taxonomy

Towards a Taxonomy of Trustworthy Digital Repository Impacts

Devan Donaldson, Samuel Russell

Indiana University, USA

Measuring the societal impact of digital repositories is a wicked problem. To capture information about the impacts of digital repositories that become certified as Trustworthy Digital Repositories (TDRs), a taxonomy describing activities cited as evidence of compliance with TDR standards is needed to relate those activities to socially beneficial outcomes. This paper presents a Minimum Viable Prototype (MVP) for a TDR Impacts taxonomy to enable the expression of their activities in a structured way. Our MVP provides a proof-of-concept that by formalizing concepts about TDRs in a taxonomy, we can investigate ways to measure whether the impacts associated with becoming and remaining a certified TDR are also impacts that generate societal value. Implications of the work described include potential strategies to identify, extract, and/or author machine-readable descriptions of measurable facets of TDR activities and the resulting impacts on communities.

 
Date: Monday, 01/Nov/2021
8:00am - 9:30amPaper Session 10: Research Data Management
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Yi-Yun Cheng, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
 
8:00am - 8:30am
ID: 260 / PS-10: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Data Curation; Sensitive Data; Collective Harms; Data Sharing; Open Science

Collective Harms and Contextual Integrity for Sensitive Data

Nicholas Weber

University of Washington, USA

Privacy protections for human subject data are often focused on reducing individual harms that result from improper disclosure of personally identifiable information. However, in a networked environment where information infrastructures enable rapid sharing and linking of different datasets there exist numerous harms which abstract to group or collective levels. In this paper we discuss how privacy protections aimed at individual harms, as opposed to collective or group harms, results in an incompatible notion of privacy protections for social science research that synthesizes multiple data sources. Using the framework of Contextual Integrity, we present empirical scenarios drawn from 17 in-depth interviews with researchers conducting synthetic research using one or more privacy sensitive data sources. We use these scenarios to identify ways that digital infrastructure providers can help social scientists manage collective harms over time through specific, targeted privacy engineering of supporting research infrastructures and data curation.



8:30am - 9:00am
ID: 172 / PS-10: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Research data management, metadata application profiles, DCAT, FAIR principles

MetaFAIR: A Metadata Application Profile for Managing Research Data

Vivian Tompkins, Brendan Honick, Katherine Polley, Jian Qin

Syracuse University, USA

This paper reports on the development of a metadata application profile (AP), MetaFAIR, designed to support research data management (RDM) to make research data findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable. The development of MetaFAIR followed a three-step process that included learning about the characteristics of datasets from researchers to establish their context and requirements, as well as iterative design and testing with researchers’ feedback. Guided by the FAIR principles, MetaFAIR focuses on accommodating description needs particular to computational social science datasets while seeking to provide general enough elements to describe data collections across many different domains. In this paper, MetaFAIR is placed in the context of historical and recent developments in the areas of RDM and application profile creation; following this contextualization, the paper describes the central considerations and challenges of the MetaFAIR development process and discusses its significance for future work in RDM.



9:00am - 9:30am
ID: 178 / PS-10: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Research data management, metadata, data description, data documentation

Toward Best Practices for Unstructured Descriptions of Research Data

Dan Phillips, Michael Smit

Dalhousie University, Canada

Achieving the potential of widespread sharing of open research data requires that sharing data is straightforward, supported, and well-understood; and that data is discoverable by researchers. Our literature review and environment scan suggest that while substantial effort is dedicated to structured descriptions of research data, unstructured fields are commonly available (title, description) yet poorly understood. There is no clear description of what information should be included, in what level of detail, and in what order. These human-readable fields, routinely used in indexing and search features and reliably federated, are essential to the research data user experience. We propose a set of high-level best practices for unstructured description of datasets, to serve as the essential starting point for more granular, discipline-specific guidance. We based these practices on extensive review of literature on research article abstracts; archival practice; experience in supporting research data management; and grey literature on data documentation. They were iteratively refined based on comments received in a webinar series with researchers, data curators, data repository managers, and librarians in Canada. We demonstrate the need for information research to more closely examine these unstructured fields and provide a foundation for a more detailed conversation.

 
10:00am - 11:30amPaper Session 12: Information, Emotion, and Mood
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Nathan Davis, The University of Texas at Austin, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
10:00am - 10:15am
ID: 237 / PS-12: 1
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Information practice; information work; invisible work; archives; affective practice research

Archivists’ Information Work Lines: Affective, Information Management, and Hybrid Onsite-Remote Work Performance

Deborah Garwood, Alex Poole

Drexel University, USA

This paper is among the first to investigate information work concepts in the archival context. A qualitative case study, it relies on two rounds of semi-structured interviews with information professionals at medical history collections in Philadelphia. These interviews bracketed the six months before and after COVID-19’s onset. We analyze three lines of information work that evolved as these archivists shifted the work context to their home environments: affective effort, information management, and hybrid onsite-remote work performance. Findings suggest that tasks such as processing, digitizing, and curating resources (invisible pre-pandemic) and reference services (visible pre-pandemic) overlap in archivists’ hybrid onsite-remote work performance during the pandemic. In recognizing the links between archivists’ information work and work performance as a holistic approach to studies of the information-intensive archival context, this research has implications for the centrality of work context, purpose, and value in the archival context.



10:15am - 10:30am
ID: 104 / PS-12: 2
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Fiction Reading Behavior, Motivations for Reading, COVID-19, Readers’ Advisory

“I Don’t Want a Book That’s Going to Make me Sad or Stressed Out, Especially in This Day and Age”: Fiction Reading (and Healing) in a Pandemic

Hyerim Cho1, Wan-Chen Lee2, Alex Urban1, Li-Min {Cassandra} Huang3, Yi Long1

1University of Missouri, USA; 2University of Washington, USA; 3University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA

To understand the roles of fiction reading in mitigating readers’ stress during the COVID-19 pandemic, this study explores readers’ motivations, preferences, and reading behaviors. Through an open-ended online survey posted on social media platforms and an online reading community, the researchers collected 76 responses from adult fiction readers. Through qualitative coding, three prominent themes were identified: escapism, re-reading behavior, and access and format. Readers actively escape into fictional worlds, often through re-reading books, to cope with the pandemic. Also, cost and available channels of access shape readers' selection of fiction book format. These themes highlight elements of fiction reading that are pertinent to emotionally-strained individuals, which can provide insight for reference and recommendation services. By advancing researchers’ understanding of pleasure reading behaviors and the important selection criteria for fiction readers during stressful times, this study contributes to the body of knowledge in Readers Advisory (RA) and information behavior.



10:30am - 10:45am
ID: 225 / PS-12: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Ancient poetry; Theme; Cold environment; Emotional word recognition; BERT

Recognition and Analysis of Emotional Words in Ancient Chinese Poetry Under Different Themes

Wei Zhang1,2, Hao Wang1,2

1Nanjing University, People's Republic of China; 2Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Data Engineering and Knowledge Service, People's Republic of China

The emotional connotation in ancient poetry is a valuable human spiritual culture, adopting the key semantic technique to parse the emotional word in poetry under different themes is beneficial to discover the relationship between poetry theme and emotion. In a “cold environment” (without learning corpus) of Tang poetry, this work presents, for the first time, the automatic recognition and analysis of large-scale humanistic emotional words within ancient Chinese poetry from different themes. A “cold start” automatic citation method for character sequences is proposed to obtain the learning corpus. The best F1 and F1_distinct of trained BERT-BiLSTM-CRFs model respectively reach 96.27% and 86.04%. Deep learning expanded imagery words that convey emotion to realize knowledge discovery. The relationships between theme and emotion word show that Chinese poetry is good at using natural objects to express various sentiments to people, with each theme of poetry owns distinguished emotion feature.



10:45am - 11:15am
ID: 255 / PS-12: 4
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: leisure, information experience, document experience, diaspora

Information as Meaningful Experience

Priya Kizhakkethil

University of North Texas, USA

Leisure is seen as important in the settlement and acculturation experiences of immigrant and refugee populations as well as helping them in maintaining their cultural identity and ties to their homeland. The study covered by this paper looks at a virtual small world, converging around a leisure activity of fanfiction reading and writing from a gender and diaspora perspective, with an aim to understanding what is experienced as information within that context. Adopting a theoretical lens drawing on information and document experience literature, information was found to be experienced as everyday, as social ties, as awareness and as memories leading to a broad conceptualization of information as meaningful experience. The study also highlighted the important role played by the social context in these experiences of information, while underscoring the usefulness in adopting an experience approach, going beyond what has been the norm in the form of information seeking and problematic situations.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmPaper Session 13: Information and Social Issues
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: John Budd, University of Missouri, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
2:00pm - 2:15pm
ID: 157 / PS-13: 1
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: 2021 Atlanta Spa Shootings, Anti-Asian Hate, Social Media Archive, Social Movement Archive, Twitter

#StopAsianHate: Archiving and Analyzing Twitter Discourse in the Wake of the 2021 Atlanta Spa Shootings

Lizhou Fan, Huizi Yu, Anne Gilliland

University of California, Los Angeles, USA

On March 16, 2021, six Asian women were killed in Atlanta, US, possibly out of racist motivations. This tragic event, now known as the 2021 Atlanta Spa Shootings, precipitated a massive increase in the volume of counter-anti-Asian declarations and discussion on social media platforms such as Twitter. In a pilot study to chronicle and profile public opinions, social movements and patterns in the global Twitter discourse we scraped the Twitter API using the query term “StopAsianHate”, obtaining more than 5.5 million tweets and their metadata. By using social movement analytical frameworks to analyze traffic peaks and the use of hashtags, we identified a set of more than 300 frequently used hashtags that can serve as specific query words in future archival ingest activities, as well as the dimensions of and current problems with this social movement. This suggests the utility of this approach for both archiving applications and social-political analyses of emerging topics and concerns.



2:15pm - 2:30pm
ID: 121 / PS-13: 2
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Content moderation, hate speech classification, political discussion, YouTube comment, political orientation

Content Moderation of Speech in Political Discussions

Yisi Sang, Lizhen Liang, Jeffrey Stanton

Syracuse University, USA

Social media platforms have been hailed as “politically disruptive communication technologies'' (Hong & Nadler, 2012). Individuals express opinions and engage with politicians, the press, and each other on social media, sometimes using offensive language (Rossini et al., 2020). Content moderation has been adopted by many social media platforms to screen and evaluate offensive speech. In the present study we trained offensive speech classifiers to analyze offensive speech examples by integrating three archival datasets. We then used the trained classifier to examine a large body of comments about YouTube videos posted during the 2018 midterm election cycle. This provided information on the prevalence of various kinds of offensive comments and the pattern of content moderation used by YouTube. We also examined comment negativity using data from offensive speech lexicons. Our results showed systematic variance in the prevalence of speech topics depending upon the political orientation of the content. Language use was significantly different between left and right-leaning videos for comments related to sexism.



2:30pm - 3:00pm
ID: 287 / PS-13: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Chinesevirus; Twitter; COVID-19; xenophobia; racist hashtag

Racist Framing through Stigmatized Naming: A Topical and Geo-locational Analysis of #Chinavirus and #Chinesevirus on Twitter

Miyoung Chong1, Haihua Chen2

1University of Virginia, USA; 2University of North Texas, USA

During the COVID-19 pandemic, racists remarks accompanied by racist hashtags were disseminated via social media. Particularly, Asian Americans in the U.S. have been suffered from racism and xenophobia resulting in physical violence and mental harassment in many cases. Despite the major function of the social media as an open access platform for unedited and free speech for people with diverse background, the global episodes of the soaring racism and xenophobia occurred in online public arenas reaffirmed that the platforms could be used for a nurturing ground of racism and xenophobia. This study examined the top influencers in the racist hashtag Twitter network and top shared neighboring hashtags with #Chinavirus or #Chinesevirus. We extracted topics from the racist hashtag Twitter network applying the state-of-the-art BERTopic modeling technique and conducted a geo-locational analysis of the participants of the network globally and by U.S. states. Trump was identified as the most influential actor in the #Chinavirus and #Chinesevirus Twitter network. This study confirmed previous literature that political elite’s public communication strategy to deviate the attention of the public suffered from the new disease and went through hardships under the epidemic crisis.



3:00pm - 3:15pm
ID: 243 / PS-13: 4
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Body-worn cameras, surveillance, policing, information politics, visual evidence

Interpreting Police Video: A Pilot Study

Bryce Newell

University of Oregon, USA

The visual records police body-worn cameras (BWCs) produce are frequently characterized as presenting more complete, comprehensive, and objective evidence of police-public encounters than other forms of evidence. Despite a growing body of research on the social impacts of BWCs, we still lack a rich understanding of what information these technologies provide viewers. This ongoing exploratory project examines how people interpret what they see in BWC footage and what judgments they make about the appropriateness of depicted police conduct. Drawing from interviews with twelve students and twelve sworn police officers, I present initial exploratory findings. Participants viewed BWC video of a police-public contact in which an officer stops a man on a sidewalk to question him, resulting in a foot chase and, ultimately, an arrest. When asked whether the officer’s behavior was justified, police officer participants were more likely to focus on things like police training, procedure, and legality to justify the officer’s action, while student participants were more likely to focus on the officer’s demeanor, reporting that he should have been calmer and may have escalated the situation by not explaining clearly why he had initiated the stop.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmCareer Development in Knowledge Management (SIG-KM)
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 128 / [Single Presentation of ID 128]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: workforce, networking, knowledge management, faculty mentoring, peer mentoring

Jeff Allen1, Lu An2, Darra Hofman3, Md. Anwarul Islam4, Heather Pfeiffer5

1University of North Texas, USA; 2Wuhan University, People's Republic of China; 3San Jose State University, USA; 4University of Dhaka, Bangladesh; 5New Mexico State University, USA

This is a SIG-KM sponsored panel presented by members of the SIG-KM officer team. First, the panel will overview their experience in knowledge management (KM) as scholars and scholar-practitioners. They will briefly discuss their career development successes and hurdles as a roadmap for others to follow. Second, the panel will discuss career pathways for KM scholars and scholar-practitioners in a global knowledge economy. Finally, they will hold an open discussion with audience members to share their experiences, expectations and hopes for the KM and the broader field of information science.

 
Date: Tuesday, 02/Nov/2021
9:00am - 10:30amPaper Session 18: Information Interactions
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Brian Detlor, McMaster University, Canada

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
9:00am - 9:30am
ID: 220 / PS-18: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Theory
Keywords: Children and Youth, Information Interaction, Epistemology, Conceptual analysis

Youth Research Under the Microscope: A Conceptual Analysis of Youth Information Interaction Studies

Vanessa Figueiredo, Eric Meyers

University of British Columbia, Canada

Youth information interaction (YII) research has focused on challenges youth encounter when interacting with information across different contexts. Although these studies have been fundamental to outline youth information behaviour, the absence of YII theoretical frameworks might limit our approach to contemporary issues, such as the increased use of apps and mobile devices for information searching. This paper presents a conceptual analysis of studies conducted between 1997-2020 to explore predominant epistemological stances and cognitive frameworks in YII. The conceptual analysis generated five typologies operationalizing YII studies in seven categories: epistemological stance, knowledge assumption, cognitive framework, study type, study design, theoretical framework, study outcomes, and applications. The findings suggest that YII research have converged to empiricist and rationalist stances supporting exploratory approaches. These findings elicit the urgency for the development of theoretical frameworks that support the validity of YII phenomena with the purpose of developing a new agenda for YII research.



9:30am - 10:00am
ID: 275 / PS-18: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Privacy and Ethics
Keywords: COVID-19, Mobile Applications, Privacy Concerns, Privacy Protections.

COVID-19 Apps and Privacy Protections from Users’ Perspective

Tian Wang, Lin Guo, Masooda Bashir

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

As the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to be a global pandemic and challenge, there has been numerous efforts and actions from both government and private organizations towards keeping their community members healthy and safe. One of the approaches is to use mobile apps to trace contacts and update status of the infected individuals in an efficient and convenient way so that the spread of the virus can be minimized and contained. While these apps could offer many advantages, it also raises serious privacy concerns for many users and hence possibly refusing to adopt it. In this study, we aim to understand the privacy protections users’ want and the provisions under which they are willing to use COVID-19 apps. We believe our study results can provide guidance for policy makers and app developers on the design, deployment, and acceptability of the COVID-19 apps that can be widely adopted.



10:00am - 10:15am
ID: 152 / PS-18: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: personal information management; file management; file systems; human-computer interaction

How Big Are Peoples' Computer Files? File Size Distributions Among User-Managed Collections

Jesse Dinneen1, Ba Nguyen2

1Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany; 2Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Improving file management interfaces and optimising system performance requires current data about users’ digital collections and particularly about the file size distributions of such collections. However, prior works have examined only the sizes of system files and users’ work files in varied contexts, and there has been no such study since 2013; it therefore remains unclear how today’s file sizes are distributed, particularly personal files, and further if distributions differ among the major operating systems or common occupations. Here we examine such differences among 49 million files in 348 user collections. We find that the average file size has grown more than ten-fold since the mid-2000s, though most files are still under 8 MB, and that there are demographic and technological influences in the size distributions. We discuss the implications for user interfaces, system optimisation, and PIM research.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmPaper Session 20: Designing for Humanities Researchers
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Maria Bonn, School of Information Sciences, univesity of Illinois Urbana Champaign, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 254 / PS-20: 1
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Sustainability; digital preservation; digital community archives; digital humanities; cultural heritage

“Meaning in the Present”: Understanding Sustainability for Digital Community Collections

Katrina Fenlon, Jessica Grimmer, Alia Fatima Reza, Courtnie Thurston

University of Maryland, USA

Living independently of mainstream institutions, digital community archives and digital humanities collections confront systemic barriers to medium- and long-term viability. Their sustainability tends to be undermined by shifts in technologies, resources, and communities over time. Because these collections contain irreplaceable and invaluable evidence of communities and histories that are underrepresented in cultural institutions, their fragility compromises the completeness and equity of our collective digital heritage. Partnerships between institutions and community-based collections often founder over a lack of shared understanding: of the expertise each partner brings to the table, of the scope and extent of mutual commitments, and of what sustainability even entails for a given project. This paper reports preliminary outcomes of a case study of the Lakeland Digital Archive, exploring how Lakeland’s community understands sustainability in the context of their digital archive, as part of a broader study of community-centered sustainability strategies for digital collections.



11:15am - 11:45am
ID: 239 / PS-20: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Archives; Human Information Interaction; information use; knowledge creation

From Information to Knowledge Creation in the Archive: Observing Humanities Researchers’ Information Activities

Alexandra Leigh1,2, Stephann Makri1, Alex Taylor1, Alec Mulinder2, Sarra Hamdi2

1City, University of London, UK; 2The National Archives, UK

As primary sources, archival records are a unique information source at the very heart of humanities research. However, how humanities researchers move from information to knowledge creation by making meaning from archival records has not been the focus of previous empirical research. This is surprising, as creating new knowledge through (re)interpretation of records is a core motivation and outcome of humanities research; as representations of historical and social occurrences, archival records rely on researchers’ interpretation of content, context, and structure to establish an ‘archival’ meaning of the record, before applying this meaning within their own work. Therefore, constructing knowledge from archival materials necessitates a dual process of knowledge creation to create novel insights from a hybrid interpretation of archival meaning and the researcher’s own interests. This paper presents findings from a naturalistic empirical observation of 11 humanities researchers engaging in research at a national archive, centring on key information activities that facilitate knowledge creation from archival records: Scanning, Relating, Capturing and Organising. Through these activities, scholars integrate their research aims and objectives with archival meaning to generate new insights. Deeper understanding of the nature of knowledge creation in archives can benefit archivists, archive users and systems designers alike.



11:45am - 12:00pm
ID: 122 / PS-20: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: digital humanities; usability testing; user experience; participatory design

Perceived Usability and Experience with Digital Tools in the Context of Digital Humanities Research

Jesse Du, Chris Yuen, Micah Slaughter, Annie Chen

University of Washington, USA

This paper examines differences in the user feedback of scholars with varied experience with digital tools. As part of a usability study of a historical digital collection, our team conducted semi-structured interviews with scholars with varying backgrounds. We categorized the sample into two groups, one with significant experience and one with little experience in using digital technology. Qualitative analysis of the interview data showed that users generally provided similar feedback. However, there were instances in which those with significant experience provided more design suggestions, and those with less experience expressed confusion and provided more feedback on website content. Drawing upon our findings, we provide recommendations for the usability evaluation of historical digital collections.



12:00pm - 12:15pm
ID: 169 / PS-20: 4
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Digital humanities; visualization; semi-structured interviews; research data curation

What is a Good Visualization for Digital Humanities Researchers? An Exploratory Study

Rongqian Ma, Fanghui Xiao

University of Pittsburgh, USA

Visualization in digital humanities (DH) has developed into a charged topic as increasing numbers of humanities researchers begin to work with machine-readable data. The current research literature on DH visualization has primarily approached the subject from a theoretical perspective, arguing the humanistic visualization should fundamentally differ from scientific visualization to represent the distinct nature of humanities data and inquiries. However, few studies have tried to empirically understand what it means to be a good visualization for humanities researchers and practitioners. This study aims to bridge this research gap by offering an exploratory investigation into researchers’ perceptions on visualization, particularly how they evaluate a visualization in humanities research. Through 10 semi-structured interviews with humanities scholars engaging in digital work, our study demonstrates that perceptions of a quality visualization among the humanities researchers are closely related to researchers’ purposes of using visualization and their self-confidence in visualization knowledge and skills. This study serves as a baseline for future empirical research on DH visualization and potentially informs the best practices for humanistic visualizations.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmPaper Session 23: Data and Representation
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Jian Qin, Syracuse University, USA
 
2:00pm - 2:15pm
ID: 155 / PS-23: 1
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Future work sentences; Construction of task systems; Content analysis

Using Future Work Sentences to Explore Research Trends of Different Tasks in a Special Domain

Yuchen Qian, Zhicheng Li, Wenke Hao, Yuzhuo Wang, Chengzhi Zhang

Nanjing University of Science and Technology, People's Republic of China

Research trend detection is an important topic for scientific researchers. Future work sentences (FWS) , as direct descriptions of future research, aren’t fully utilized in research trend detection. Therefore, this article uses FWS to investigate research trends of different tasks in a particular domain. Taking the conference papers in the natural language processing (NLP) field as our research objects, we obtain the FWS in each paper to build the corpus and classified them into 6 main types. After that, the task of each paper is annotated, and a task system with 29 categories is constructed to compare the FWS in different tasks. The results show that the proportion of method mentioned in FWS is the highest, and different tasks focus on different FWS types: emerging tasks need more resources, while mature tasks prefer method and application. This study provides researchers a reference to understand the research trend of specific tasks and is helpful to compare different tasks.



2:15pm - 2:30pm
ID: 162 / PS-23: 2
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Theory
Keywords: Bibliographic Entities; BIBFRAME; Linked Data; Data Mining; Fp-growth

Publisher References in Bibliographic Entity Descriptions

Jim Hahn

University of Pennsylvania, USA

This paper describes a method for improved access to publisher references in linked data RDF editors using data mining techniques and a large corpus of library metadata encoded in the MARC21 standard. The corpus is comprised of clustered sets of publishers and publisher locations from the library MARC21 records found in the Platform for Open Data (POD). POD is a data aggregation project involving member institutions of the IvyPlus Library Confederation and contains seventy million MARC21 records, forty million of which are unique. The discovery of publisher entity sets described forms the basis for the streamlined description of BIBFRAME Instance entities. The result of this work includes a database of association rules and RDF editor improvements. The association rules are the basis of a prototype autosuggestion feature of BIBFRAME Instance entity description properties designed specifically to support the auto-population of publisher entities in linked data RDF editors.



2:30pm - 2:45pm
ID: 124 / PS-23: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Archival item-level metadata, named entity disambiguation, Wikidata, linked data, entity management

Named Entity Disambiguation for Archival Collections: Metadata, Wikidata, and Linked Data

Katherine Polley, Vivian Tompkins, Brendan Honick, Jian Qin

Syracuse University, USA

Representing archival metadata as linked data can increase the findability and usability of items, and linked data sources such as Wikidata can be used to further enrich existing collection metadata. However, a central challenge to this process is the named entity disambiguation or entity linking that is required to ensure that the named entities in a collection are being properly matched to Wikidata entities so that any additional metadata is applied correctly. This paper details our experimentation with one entity linking system called OpenTapioca, which was chosen for its use of Wikidata and its accessibility to librarians and archivists with minimal technical intervention. We discuss the results of using OpenTapioca for named entity disambiguation on the Belfer Cylinders Collection from the Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University, highlighting the successes and limitations of the system and of using Wikidata as a knowledge base.



2:45pm - 3:00pm
ID: 170 / PS-23: 4
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Subject representation, Metadata evaluation, Metadata change, Bibliographic metadata

Patterns of Subject Metadata Change in MARC 21 Bibliographic Records for Video Recordings

Vyacheslav Zavalin1, Oksana Zavalina2, Rachel Safa1

1Texas Woman's University, USA; 2University of North Texas, USA

Study reported in this paper analyzed over 20 thousand of machine-readable library metadata records in MARC 21 bibliographic format that are based on Resource Description and Access (RDA) standard. The focus of this analysis is on change in subject metadata – data elements designed for representing the aboutness of information objects – over a 6-year period between 2014 and 2020. The analyzed dataset is the entire population of the records representing English-language video recordings in DVD format in WorldCat database as of one year after official transition to RDA data content standard in library metadata creation. Analysis of metadata representing audiovisual materials is needed as audiovisual metadata practices tend to differ from those for other materials due to high occurrence of unique resources. The study includes quantitative and qualitative analyses into the change in the application of data elements (fields and subfields) over time and categorizes the observed change.



3:00pm - 3:30pm
ID: 231 / PS-23: 5
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Social media, misinformation, digital forensics, image compression, memes

Forensic Analysis of Memetic Image Propagation: Introducing the SMOC BRISQUEt Method

James Hodges1, Mitch Chaiet2, Praful Gupta1

1The University of Texas at Austin, USA; 2Harvard Kennedy School Shorenstein Center, USA

This paper introduces a mixed-methods approach for forensically reconstructing the propagation of visual media via networked digital devices. The authors present case studies drawn from political misinformation around the January 6, 2021 riots at the U.S. Capitol. Using interpretive analysis, the authors identify traces of user interfaces that remain in images being shared about the riots. Using computational analysis, the authors evaluate compression levels in digital photographs of the events in question, thus identifying which instances of the image are closer to the source (as well as which images appear to be identical). By combining these two approaches, the authors argue that SMOC BRISQUEt refines our understanding of misinformation’s memetic spread.

 

 
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