Conference Agenda (All times are shown in Mountain Daylight Time)

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
Filter by Track or Type of Session 
Only Sessions at Location/Venue 
 
 
Session Overview
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
Date: Sunday, 31/Oct/2021
11:00am - 12:30pmConceptualizing Relevance of Information as a Social Justice Issue: An Interactive Panel Discussion
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 226 / [Single Presentation of ID 226]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Diversity; Equity; Inclusion; Relevance; Social Justice

Joseph Winberry1, LaVerne Gray2, Jean Hardy3, Baheya Jaber4, Bharat Mehra4

1University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA; 2Syracuse University, USA; 3Michigan State University, USA; 4University of Alabama, USA

Relevance is a notion whose meaning and purpose have been widely discussed in information retrieval research. The ultimate aim of relevance—what Tefko Saracevic has called the “you know” principle—is to ensure that users have the information necessary to meet their goals. What is often missing from this discussion is a critical assessment of who gets to decide what information is relevant, under what circumstances, and for what purposes—especially in relation to marginalized populations. The limited discussion of social justice in information relevance research is a gap this interactive panel discussion seeks to address. Five emerging, junior, and senior researchers will each identify and outline social justice themes of information relevance (e.g., intersectionality, Black feminist lens, geography, immigration status, and holistic critical relevance) that have been evident in their own scholarship. Audience members will have an opportunity to expand on one of the five themes in concert with a panelist before participants consider together future directions for relevance of information in a social justice context. While each participant may have different definitions of social justice, a broad interpretation of the term will frame the conversation by indicating how information relevance can move society towards a fairer and more equitable future.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmPaper Session 05: Trust in Technology
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Jiangen He, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA
 
2:00pm - 2:30pm
ID: 113 / PS-05: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Trusted AI, Intelligent Personal Assistant, Human Computer Interaction, Voice Interaction, Models

Why Do You Trust Siri? The Factors Affecting Trustworthiness of Intelligent Personal Assistant

Dan Wu, Ye-man Huang

Wuhan University, People's Republic of China

Trust greatly contributes to human-AI collaboration, however, human’s trust to IPA is hard to establish and lacks exploration. The purpose of this paper is to recognize the factors that affect the trustworthiness of IPA. 358 questionnaires were analyzed by PLS-SEM to construct the model, while thematic analysis was used to discover expectance of IPA. Chi-square tests and T-test were used to distinguish the difference between two user groups. Three factors that capability of system, personality of agent, and availability of interface have a significant impact on the trustworthiness of IPA. The capability of system is the most essential as the threshold with users’ plenty of expectations. Most users pay less attention to the availability of interface and the personality of agent has a great impact on the trustworthiness of IPA. The factors found enrich the trusted AI research and inspire insights of design of IPA.



2:30pm - 3:00pm
ID: 244 / PS-05: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: COVID-19, coronavirus, Google Autocomplete, conspiracy theory, social contagion

“COVID19 is_”: The Perpetuation of Coronavirus Conspiracy Theories via Google Autocomplete

Daniel Houli, Marie Radford, Vivek Singh

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, USA

As the COVID-19 pandemic spread in 2020, uncertainty surrounding its origins and nature led to widespread conspiracy-related theories (CRT). Use of technological platforms enabled the rapid and exponential spread of COVID-19 CRT. This study applies social contagion theory to examine how Google Autocomplete (GA) perpetuates COVID-19 CRT. An in-house software program, Autocomplete Search Logging Tool (ASLT) captured a snapshot of GA COVID-19 related searches early in the pandemic (from March to May 2020) across 76 randomly-selected countries to gain insight into search behaviors thought to reflect beliefs globally. The authors identified 15 keywords relating to COVID-19 CRT predictions. Findings show that the searches across different countries received varying degrees of GA COVID-19 CRT predictions. This investigation is among the first to apply social contagion theory to autocomplete applications and can be used in future research to explain and perhaps mitigate the spread of CRT.



3:00pm - 3:30pm
ID: 266 / PS-05: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Voice Digital Assistants, Interface Mirroring, Voice Switching Behavior, Inclusive Design

Hey There! What Do You Look Like? User Voice Switching and Interface Mirroring in Voice-Enabled Digital Assistants (VDAs)

Dania Bilal, Jessica Barfield

University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA

We investigated user voice switching behavior (VSB) in voice-enabled digital assistants (VDAs), focusing on the importance of and preference for the voice accents, genders, and age to match with those of the users. We incorporated images of ten people with diverse races, ethnicities, age, genders, and religions to embody the voice interfaces (EVIs). In an online survey, we collected demographic, background, and VDA usage data. The sample consisted of 214 participants recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk (http://mturk.com). The participants were selected based on owning a VDA (e.g., Alexa Home) or owning a device (e.g., smartphone, tablet, or computer), and setting the device on English as the default language. The age of the participants ranged from 18-35 years. Findings revealed that, regardless of age, the majority of the participants switched the voice interface and for various reasons. Further, participants placed importance on voice matching with their gender, accent, and age. Participants ranked the young White female, Asian female, and Black female EVIs as the most preferred for voice switching and interactions. We coin the concept, Interface mirroring, which should help designers to create more diverse and inclusive EVIs, ensuring fairness and equality in the design of VDAs.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmPaper Session 08: Scientometrics and Bibliometrics
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Ly Dinh, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
 
4:00pm - 4:15pm
ID: 101 / PS-08: 1
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Bibliometrics, Library and Information Science, Scholarly communication, Scientific communities

Journals as Communities: A Case Study of Core Journals in LIS

Jeppe Nicolaisen1, Tove Faber Frandsen2

1University of Copenhagen, Denmark; 2University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

This paper proposes an indicator for measuring the level of commitment to academic journals. The indicator is demonstrated on a sample of core LIS-journals. By monitoring authorship patterns over a 20-year period, it is shown that some journals have a higher frequency of returning authors than others, consequently showing a larger degree of community commitment. The paper discusses how the indicator may be applied when studying factors influencing researchers’ journal selection decisions.



4:15pm - 4:45pm
ID: 118 / PS-08: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education; Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education; Information Literacy, Higher education; Bibliometric mapping analysis

Research Trends from a Decade (2011-2020) for Information Literacy in Higher Education: Content and Bibliometric Mapping Analysis

Chao-Chen Chen1, Ning-Chiao Wang2, Yun-Fang Tu3, Hsin Ju Lin4

1Chung Yuan Christian University and National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan; 2University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA; 3Fu Jen Catholic University, Taiwan; 4National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan

New terms and theoretical concepts in information literacy have emerged over the last decade, and these have led to revisions in the standards for information literacy. In order to determine whether information literacy research has reflected these trends, we collected SSCI literature for the 2011 to 2020 period related to information literacy in higher education (ILHE) and conducted analysis using bibliographic mapping and content analysis. Our research found that the volume of research on ILHE has increased in the last five years as compared to the five years before that, and that keywords related to literacy (such as “digital literacy” and “multiliteracies”) have been getting a great deal of discussion. After the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (FILHE) was announced, curriculum design research based on the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (ILCSHE) continued to outnumber that done based on the Framework.



4:45pm - 5:00pm
ID: 230 / PS-08: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Open Access; Bibliometrics analysis; Research impact; Self-citation; Covid-19;

Use of Bibliometrics Data to Understand the Citation Advantages of Different Open Access Categories in Covid-19 Related Studies

Xiaoju Julie Chen, Neelam Bharti, Matthew Marsteller

Carnegie Mellon University, USA

The number of Open Access (OA) research articles is trending upward. This research aims to understand the correlations between different OA types and the impact of OA research articles evaluated based on the citation numbers. To avoid bias caused by the publication year, we chose to use COVID-19 studies in different fields to take advantage of this topic’s quick turnaround of data. We analyzed the bibliometrics data and citation numbers (excluding self-citations) of around 42,000 English language articles published in 2020 related to COVID-19. We evaluated different types of OA categories such as Gold, Bronze, and Hybrid articles separately. Results show that amongst all OA categories, Hybrid/Green and Bronze/Green OA articles had significant citation advantages. Green OA articles returned more citations than articles with the other OA status. Gold OA articles have no citation advantages compared to non-OA articles. Gold/Green OA articles had the highest self-citation rates, followed by Non-OA articles. The results of the study can be used in understanding different OA categories and the reasons for OA choices. Certain strategies can be made accordingly to improve the awareness of OA in different fields and help OA publishers to improve the OA services.



5:00pm - 5:30pm
ID: 240 / PS-08: 4
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: citations, scientometrics, citation motives, influence, scholarly publishing

Citation Quantity Increases Citation Quality

Misha Teplitskiy1, Eamon Duede2, Michael Menietti3, Karim Lakhani3

1University of Michigan, USA; 2University of Chicago, USA; 3Harvard University, USA

Scholars typically measure the influence of scientific work using citation counts, but many citations are symbolic and denote little-to-no influence. A common view is that highly cited papers may be especially appealing for “persuasion by name-dropping” and attract many symbolic citations, making their citations denote less influence on average. Here, we rigorously test this view using customized author surveys about the intellectual influence of referenced work on an author’s own papers, collecting data on 17,154 referencing decisions from 9,380 corresponding authors. Results are contrary to persuasion by name-dropping: while most citations (54%) had little influence on their citers, citations to the most highly cited papers were two to three times more likely to denote high influence. To explain this pattern we develop a process model based on status signals, and support it with experimental and associational data. Overall, we find that authors invest more attention into highly cited papers and cite them less symbolically, making these papers influence the research frontier even more than their raw citation counts suggest.

 
Date: Monday, 01/Nov/2021
8:00am - 9:30amWhat’s Next for Information World Mapping? International and Multidisciplinary Uses of the Method
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 146 / [Single Presentation of ID 146]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Research Methods
Keywords: Research methods, Visual methods, Arts-involved methods, Qualitative methods, Information behavior

Devon Greyson1, Tien-I Tsai2, Vanessa Kitzie3, Konstantina Martzoukou4, Millicent Mabi5

1University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA; 2National Taiwan University, Taiwan; 3University of South Carolina, USA; 4Robert Gordon University, Scotland; 5University of British Columbia, Canada

As use of arts-involved and data visualization methods increases in information science, it is important to reflect on strengths and weaknesses of various methods. In this 90-minute panel, an international lineup of information researchers will share their experiences using the participatory, visual elicitation technique information world mapping (IWM) in their work. Panelists will discuss ways to adapt the technique to different contexts, share their thoughts on what is next for IWM, and raise questions regarding challenges and new uses of IWM in information research. Presentations will be followed by an interactive discussion among panelists and Q&A period with the audience.

 
10:00am - 11:30amInformation Injustice and Intellectual Freedom: Polarizing Concepts for a Polarizing Time
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 223 / [Single Presentation of ID 223]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Privacy and Ethics
Keywords: justice, intellectual freedom, information poverty, information marginalization, social inclusion

Shannon Oltmann1, Ana Ndumu2, Emily Knox3, John Burgess4

1University of Kentucky, USA; 2University of Maryland, USA; 3University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA; 4University of Alabama, USA

Historically, information professionals have advocated for intellectual freedom, specifically the rights to free speech and expression. The unrestricted flow of information has been foundational to library and information science practice. Yet, free speech at times is protected to the detriment of vulnerable communities. In this panel discussion, four library and information science researchers discuss the scholarly and pragmatic tensions surrounding LIS ethics and anti-hegemony. Using Chatman’s (1996) concept of information poverty and Gibson and Martin’s (2019) theory of information marginalization as discursive guides, the panelists will describe how they negotiate ethical principles, information justice, LIS professionalization, and social inclusion.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmSearch a Great Leveler? Ensuring More Equitable Information Acquisition
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 153 / [Single Presentation of ID 153]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Information equity, information acquisition, search, design

Stephann Makri1, Dana McKay6, George Buchanan2, Shanton Chang2, Dirk Lewandowski3, Andy MacFarlane1, Lynne Cole1, Sanne Vrijenhoek4, Andrés Ferraro5

1City, University of London, UK; 2Universit of Melbourne, Australia; 3Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Germany; 4University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; 5Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain; 6RMIT, Australia

The ubiquitous search box promised to democratize knowledge access by making information universally accessible. But while many search engines cater well for certain user groups, information tasks and content types, they cater poorly for others. Poorly-served users include those with certain types of impairment (e.g. dyslexia), and weakly-supported tasks include highly exploratory goals, where it can be difficult to express information needed as a query. Furthermore, the overdominance of search functionality in many information environments has restricted support for other important forms of information acquisition, such as serendipitous information encountering and creative ‘inspiration hunting.’ Search results and recommendations can also promote certain types of content due to algorithmic bias. Rather than act as a great leveler by making information acquisition effective, efficient and enjoyable for all, search engines often unfairly favor some types of user, task or content over others. In short, search is not always equitable. This panel discussion will elucidate the inequity of search as an information acquisition paradigm from multiple perspectives and propose design principles to ensure more equitable information acquisition.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmAt the Margins of Epistemology: Amplifying Alternative Ways of Knowing in Library and Information Science
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 228 / [Single Presentation of ID 228]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Epistemology, epistemicide, and epistemic injustice; equity, diversity, inclusion and justice; data, information, and knowledge; library and information science; paradigm shift

Beth Patin1, Tami Oliphant2, Danille Allard2, LaVerne Gray1, Rachel Clarke1, Jasmina Tacheva1, Kayla Lar-Son3

1Syracuse University, USA; 2University of Alberta, Canada; 3University of British Columbia, Canada

This panel argues a paradigm shift is needed in library and information science (LIS) to move the field toward information equity, inclusion, relevance, diversity, and justice. LIS has undermined knowledge systems falling outside of Western traditions. While the foundations of LIS are based on epistemological concerns, the field has neglected to treat people as epistemic agents who are embedded in cultures, social relations and identities, and knowledge systems that inform and shape their interactions with data, information, and knowledge as well as our perceptions of each other as knowers. To achieve this shift we examine epistemicide --the killing, silencing, annihilation, or devaluing of a knowledge system, epistemic injustice and a critique of the user-centered paradigm. We present alternative epistemologies for LIS: critical consciousness, Black feminism, and design epistemology and discuss these in practice: community generated knowledges as sites of resistance and Indigenous data sovereignty and the “right to know”.

 
Date: Tuesday, 02/Nov/2021
9:00am - 10:30amEndurance and Coherence: The Post-2020 iSchool
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 257 / [Single Presentation of ID 257]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: diversity, information science field, interdisciplinarity, internationalism, iSchools

Leslie Thomson1, Ben Kaden2, Michael Kleineberg2, Di Wang3, Gary Marchionini1, Vivien Petras2, Lihong Zhou3, Gobinda Chowdhury4, Maryam Bugaje4, Michael Seadle5

1University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA; 2Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany; 3Wuhan University, People's Republic of China; 4University of Strathclyde, UK; 5iSchools Organization, Inc.

The iSchools Organization encompasses 121 information and library science schools around the globe, and is rapidly expanding. Officially begun in the early 2000s as a way to bolster a sense of field-wide purpose and identity relevant to the twenty-first century, among other objectives, iSchools are positioned as those sharing an interest in information, people, and technology. Early questions about endurance of the iSchools movement are now largely overshadowed by, and joined with, questions about coherence of the iSchools movement. This 90-minute virtual panel will present international findings about issues that are currently, as of 2020-2021, top-of-mind for iSchool leaders, pertaining to: 1.) views on and of the field of information; 2.) faculty and institutional relationships; and 3.) extra-unit alliances and alignments, including with and within the iSchools Organization itself. It draws mainly upon interview data from the funded project i4G: Shaping the iSchools’ Identity and Interaction in a Globalized World.

 
11:00am - 12:30pm“Unity in Diversity”: A Conversation Around the Interdisciplinary Identity of Information Science
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 134 / [Single Presentation of ID 134]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Information science, Identity, Diversity, Interdisciplinary field, Unity in diversity

Abebe Rorissa2, Hemalata Iyer1, Devendra Potnis2, Nadia Caidi3, Daniel Alemneh4

1University at Albany, SUNY, USA; 2University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA; 3University of Toronto, Canada; 4University of North Texas, USA

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmSocial Media, Vaccines, and Partisan Division of Health Information (SIG-SM)
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 194 / [Single Presentation of ID 194]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Social Media, Vaccine, Health Information Behavior, Politics

Loni Hagen1, Devon Greyson2, Ashley Fox3, Kolina Koltai4, Catherine Dumas5

1University of South Florida, USA; 2University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA; 3University at Albany, SUNY, USA; 4University of Washington, USA; 5Simmons University, USA

 

 
Contact and Legal Notice · Contact Address:
Privacy Statement · Conference: ASIS&T 2021
Conference Software - ConfTool Pro 2.6.143+TC
© 2001–2022 by Dr. H. Weinreich, Hamburg, Germany