Conference Agenda (All times are shown in Mountain Daylight Time)

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
Filter by Track or Type of Session 
Only Sessions at Date / Time 
 
 
Session Overview
Date: Tuesday, 02/Nov/2021
7:30am - 8:45amChapter Assembly Meeting
Location: Salon A, Lobby Level, Marriott
7:30am - 9:00amJASIST Editorial Board and Breakfast Meeting (Sponsored by Wiley) by invitation
Location: Solitude, Lobby Level, Marriott
7:30am - 5:00pmSpeaker Ready Room
Location: Park City, 2nd Floor, Marriott
7:30am - 6:00pmRegistration
Location: Ballroom B Foyer, Lobby Level, Marriott
8:00am - 5:00pmPlacement Service
Location: Alta, 2nd Floor, Marriott
8:00am - 5:00pmPlacement Service
Location: Canyons, 2nd Floor, Marriott
9:00am - 10:30amPaper Session 16: Co-Design and Participatory Design
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Elizabeth Tague Frakes, University of Utah, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
9:00am - 9:30am
ID: 156 / PS-16: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: co-design; participatory design; health information; eHealth; older adults

Designing eHealth Tutorials with and for Older Adults

Nathan Davis1, Kristina Shiroma1, Bo Xie1, Tom Yeh2, Xu Han2, Atami De Main1

1The University of Texas at Austin, USA; 2University of Colorado Boulder, USA

Older adults may be excluded from using digital health technologies due to limited eHealth literacy. Research is much needed to decrease disparities in eHealth literacy and increase the inclusiveness of such technologies. Integrating the preferences and expertise of older adults is key to age-appropriate design of eHealth tutorials. This study explores how participatory design (PD) techniques can be adapted to include older adults in the design of an eHealth tutorial. We worked with 9 older adults (aged 64 and 82) as co-designers and conducted PD sessions over 11 weeks in a senior center’s computer lab. Using thematic analysis, we identified 7 themes around the design of eHealth tutorials for older adults. We also identified successes and challenges in PD with older adults, along with benefits of partnering with senior centers. Our findings have implications for both the design of eHealth tutorials for older adults and for PD with older adults.



9:30am - 10:00am
ID: 149 / PS-16: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Research Methods
Keywords: Participatory Design, Participatory Action Research, Co-design, Children and Youth, Literature review

The Meaning of “Participation” in Co-Design with Children and Youth: Relationships, Roles, and Interactions

Leanne Bowler, Karen Wang, Irene Lopatovska, Mark Rosin

Pratt Institute, USA

The paper examines the concept of participation in co-design practices with children and youth. Rooted in Participatory Design and Participatory Action Research frameworks, the paper draws from multi-disciplinary literature to survey existing definitions of the relationships, roles, and types of human interactions in participatory co-design. The paper advocates for the active role of children and youth in the co-design process and presents models of youth participation. The paper highlights the importance of understanding and clearly communicating various degrees of participation, with the ultimate goal of empowering youth and involving them in brainstorming, planning, decision-making, and interpretation stages of the design process. We introduce the concept of conscious co-design and the need to reflect on the design process at a meta level in Participatory Design and Participatory Action Research.

 
9:00am - 10:30amPaper Session 17: Science of Science
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Chris Cunningham, North Carolina Central University, USA
 
9:00am - 9:15am
ID: 164 / PS-17: 1
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Interdisciplinarity; Disparity; Node2Vec; Citation analysis; Scholarly communication

Measurement of Interdisciplinarity: Quantifying Distance-Based Disparity Using Node2vec

Hongyu Zhou, Raf Guns, Tim Engels

University of Antwerp, Belgium

When quantifying the level of interdisciplinarity for scientific research, most established indicators employ a three-element diversity framework, namely variety, balance, and disparity, each of which captures a distinct but insufficient element. Among three, disparity, i.e. how different (dissimilar) the categories within a system are, is the most challenging one due to its calculation cost and conceptual ambiguity. The discriminative power for disparity is found to be weakened in more fine-grained science classification schemes. To address this issue, this paper proposes a new method for quantifying disparity by applying Node2vec on the discipline citation network and retrieving distance between disciplines using embeddings vectors. Compared to cosine-based dissimilarity for disparity, our proposed method exhibited broader distribution and less skewness for disparity values, which could potentially lead to higher discriminative power of interdisciplinarity. A case study for Linguistics is also conducted to show the capability of detecting variations in disparity of the proposed method.



9:15am - 9:45am
ID: 277 / PS-17: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Interdisciplinary collaboration, Disruption, Regression analysis

Is Interdisciplinary Collaboration Research More Disruptive Than Monodisciplinary Research?

Xin Liu1, Yi Bu2, Ming Li1, Jiang Li1

1Nanjing University, People's Republic of China; 2Peking University, People's Republic of China

As an important pattern of scientific research, interdisciplinary collaboration is universally encouraged by science and technology policy makers. However, it remains a question whether interdisciplinary collaboration research is more disruptive than monodisciplinary research. To address this research question in this study, interdisciplinary collaboration is measured as whether the authors of a paper are from at least two disciplines, and the degree of "disruptive" is measured by the Disruption index proposed by Funk & Owen-Smith (2017). By using articles published in six journals from 1978 to 2019 in the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG) database, we constructed an OLS regression model with journal fixed effect and time fixed effect to analyze the influence of interdisciplinary collaboration on the Disruption values with different citation windows. The findings show that interdisciplinary collaboration research is less disruptive than monodisciplinary research.



9:45am - 10:00am
ID: 217 / PS-17: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Research Lineage, Citation Significance Detection, Feature Engineering, Machine Learning, Idea Propagation

A Step Towards Finding a Research Lineage Leveraging on Identification of Significant Citations

Tirthankar Ghosal, Muskaan Singh

Charles University, Czech Republic

Finding the lineage of a research topic is crucial for understanding the prior state of the art and advancing scientific displacement. The deluge of scholarly articles makes it difficult to locate the most relevant prior work and causes researchers to spend a considerable amount of time building up their literature list. Citations play a significant role in discovering relevant literature. However, not all citations are created equal. A majority of the citations that a paper receives are for providing contextual, and background information to the citing papers and are not central to the theme of those papers. However, some papers are pivotal to the citing paper and inspire or stem up the research in the citing paper. Hence the nature of citation the former receives from the later is significant. In this work in progress paper, we discuss our preliminary idea towards establishing a lineage for a given research via identifying significant citations. We hypothesize that such an automated system can facilitate relevant literature discovery and help identify knowledge flow for at least a certain category of papers. The distal goal of this work is to identify the real impact of research work or a facility beyond direct citation counts.



10:00am - 10:30am
ID: 264 / PS-17: 4
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: double-blind peer review, prestige bias, choice architecture

Does Double-Blind Peer Review Reduce Bias? Evidence from a Top Computer Science Conference

Mengyi Sun, Jainabou Dafna, Misha Teplitskiy

University of Michigan, USA

Peer review is essential for advancing scientific research, but there are long-standing concerns that reviewers are biased by authors' prestige or other characteristics. Double-blind peer review has been proposed as a way to reduce reviewer bias, but the evidence for its effectiveness is limited and mixed. Here, we examine the effects of double-blind peer review by analyzing the peer review files of 5027 papers submitted to a top computer science conference that changed its reviewing format from single- to double-blind in 2018. We find that after switching to double-blind review, the scores given to the most prestigious authors significantly decreased. However, because many of these papers were above the threshold for acceptance, the change did not affect paper acceptance significantly. The inter-reviewer disagreement increased significantly in the double-blind format. Papers rejected in the single-blind format are cited more than those rejected under double-blind, suggesting that double-blind review better excludes poorer quality papers. Lastly, an apparently unrelated change in the rating scale from 10 to 4 points likely reduced prestige bias significantly such that papers’ acceptance was affected. These results support the effectiveness of double-blind review in reducing biases, while opening new research directions on the impact of peer review formats.

 
9:00am - 10:30amExamining Concepts of the Public: Who is Served by Information Services? (SIG-HFIS and SIG-CR)
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 252 / [Single Presentation of ID 252]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Social diversity, library communities, public libraries, Information Science, vulnerable populations, community archives

Jeremy Abbott, Michelle Caswell, Gregory Leazer, Robert Montoya, Safiya Noble

University of California, Los Angeles, USA

The goal of this panel is to define foundational social “boundaries” that libraries typically consider when defining their constituents. Who do librarians, archivists and information specialists serve? In the last decade we have witnessed a general pivot in nomenclature, from the “user” to “community.” What is behind the evolution in this terminology? Is this a simple change in the words we use, or does this reflect a new conceptualization of clientele or “the public?” The goal of this panel is to define foundational social and epistemic “boundaries” that libraries and information institutions typically consider when defining their constituents of interest. As a HFIS-sponsored panel, the idea is to define foundational segments of the 'public sphere' that are of particular note in contemporary social, cultural, political, and geographic spaces and circumstances.

 
9:00am - 10:30amEndurance and Coherence: The Post-2020 iSchool
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 257 / [Single Presentation of ID 257]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: diversity, information science field, interdisciplinarity, internationalism, iSchools

Leslie Thomson1, Ben Kaden2, Michael Kleineberg2, Di Wang3, Gary Marchionini1, Vivien Petras2, Lihong Zhou3, Gobinda Chowdhury4, Maryam Bugaje4, Michael Seadle5

1University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA; 2Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany; 3Wuhan University, People's Republic of China; 4University of Strathclyde, UK; 5iSchools Organization, Inc.

The iSchools Organization encompasses 121 information and library science schools around the globe, and is rapidly expanding. Officially begun in the early 2000s as a way to bolster a sense of field-wide purpose and identity relevant to the twenty-first century, among other objectives, iSchools are positioned as those sharing an interest in information, people, and technology. Early questions about endurance of the iSchools movement are now largely overshadowed by, and joined with, questions about coherence of the iSchools movement. This 90-minute virtual panel will present international findings about issues that are currently, as of 2020-2021, top-of-mind for iSchool leaders, pertaining to: 1.) views on and of the field of information; 2.) faculty and institutional relationships; and 3.) extra-unit alliances and alignments, including with and within the iSchools Organization itself. It draws mainly upon interview data from the funded project i4G: Shaping the iSchools’ Identity and Interaction in a Globalized World.

 
9:00am - 10:30amPaper Session 18: Information Interactions
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Brian Detlor, McMaster University, Canada

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
9:00am - 9:30am
ID: 220 / PS-18: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Theory
Keywords: Children and Youth, Information Interaction, Epistemology, Conceptual analysis

Youth Research Under the Microscope: A Conceptual Analysis of Youth Information Interaction Studies

Vanessa Figueiredo, Eric Meyers

University of British Columbia, Canada

Youth information interaction (YII) research has focused on challenges youth encounter when interacting with information across different contexts. Although these studies have been fundamental to outline youth information behaviour, the absence of YII theoretical frameworks might limit our approach to contemporary issues, such as the increased use of apps and mobile devices for information searching. This paper presents a conceptual analysis of studies conducted between 1997-2020 to explore predominant epistemological stances and cognitive frameworks in YII. The conceptual analysis generated five typologies operationalizing YII studies in seven categories: epistemological stance, knowledge assumption, cognitive framework, study type, study design, theoretical framework, study outcomes, and applications. The findings suggest that YII research have converged to empiricist and rationalist stances supporting exploratory approaches. These findings elicit the urgency for the development of theoretical frameworks that support the validity of YII phenomena with the purpose of developing a new agenda for YII research.



9:30am - 10:00am
ID: 275 / PS-18: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Privacy and Ethics
Keywords: COVID-19, Mobile Applications, Privacy Concerns, Privacy Protections.

COVID-19 Apps and Privacy Protections from Users’ Perspective

Tian Wang, Lin Guo, Masooda Bashir

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

As the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to be a global pandemic and challenge, there has been numerous efforts and actions from both government and private organizations towards keeping their community members healthy and safe. One of the approaches is to use mobile apps to trace contacts and update status of the infected individuals in an efficient and convenient way so that the spread of the virus can be minimized and contained. While these apps could offer many advantages, it also raises serious privacy concerns for many users and hence possibly refusing to adopt it. In this study, we aim to understand the privacy protections users’ want and the provisions under which they are willing to use COVID-19 apps. We believe our study results can provide guidance for policy makers and app developers on the design, deployment, and acceptability of the COVID-19 apps that can be widely adopted.



10:00am - 10:15am
ID: 152 / PS-18: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: personal information management; file management; file systems; human-computer interaction

How Big Are Peoples' Computer Files? File Size Distributions Among User-Managed Collections

Jesse Dinneen1, Ba Nguyen2

1Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany; 2Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Improving file management interfaces and optimising system performance requires current data about users’ digital collections and particularly about the file size distributions of such collections. However, prior works have examined only the sizes of system files and users’ work files in varied contexts, and there has been no such study since 2013; it therefore remains unclear how today’s file sizes are distributed, particularly personal files, and further if distributions differ among the major operating systems or common occupations. Here we examine such differences among 49 million files in 348 user collections. We find that the average file size has grown more than ten-fold since the mid-2000s, though most files are still under 8 MB, and that there are demographic and technological influences in the size distributions. We discuss the implications for user interfaces, system optimisation, and PIM research.

 
9:00am - 10:30amResearch Engagement Committee Meeting
Location: Snowbird, 2nd Floor, Marriott
10:30am - 11:00amCoffee Break
Location: Ballroom Prefunction, Lobby Level, Marriott
10:30am - 12:30pmExhibits
Location: Ballroom Prefunction, Lobby Level, Marriott
11:00am - 12:30pmPaper Session 19: Information Seeking and Information Search
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Steven Hardin, Indiana State University, USA
 
11:00am - 11:30am
ID: 123 / PS-19: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Information needs, social science, research data, user study

Genuine Information Needs of Social Scientists Looking for Data

Andrea Papenmeier1, Thomas Krämer1, Tanja Friedrich2, Daniel Hienert1, Dagmar Kern1

1GESIS Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany; 2German Aerospace Center, Germany

Publishing research data is widely expected to increase its reuse and to inspire new research. In the social sciences, data from surveys, interviews, polls, and statistics are primary resources for research. There is a long tradition to collect and offer research data in data archives and online repositories. Researchers use these systems to identify data relevant to their research. However, especially in data search, users’ complex information needs seem to collide with the capabilities of data search systems. The search capabilities, in turn, depend to a high degree upon the metadata schemes used to describe the data. In this research, we conducted an online survey with 72 social science researchers who expressed their individual information needs for research data like they would do when asking a colleague for help. We analyzed these information needs and attributed their different components to the categories: topic, metadata, and intention. We compared these categories and their content to existing metadata models of research data and the search and filter opportunities offered in existing data search systems. We found a mismatch between what users have as a requirement for their data and what is offered on metadata level and search system possibilities.



11:30am - 12:00pm
ID: 183 / PS-19: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Conversational Search Systems, Information-seeking Dialogues, Discourse, Spoken Search, Voice-based Personal Assistants

“Can You Search for Me?” Understanding and Improving User-System Dialogues for Complex Search Tasks

Souvick Ghosh

San José State University, USA

Most voice-based personal assistants are suitable for simple tasks which are not conversational but single-turn question-answering. To address this limitation, we investigate the dialogue capabilities of commercial conversational systems and compare them to the standards expected by the users. We designed a set of moderately complex search tasks and used two popular personal assistants to evaluate the user-system interaction. A laboratory-based user study was conducted with twenty-five users and seventy-five search sessions to collect user-system conversational dialogues (for three search tasks). Next, we show that using a set of simple rules, which could be implemented in the immediate future, it is possible to improve the users’ interaction experience and make the system more anthropomorphic. Using a conceptual prototype where a human (Wizard) played the role of the system (unknowing to the users), we demonstrate the efficacy of the guidelines and provide design recommendations for future conversational search systems.



12:00pm - 12:30pm
ID: 258 / PS-19: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Satisfaction · fMRI · Information Need · Neural Correlates · Search Process.

Neural Correlates of Realisation of Satisfaction in a Successful Search Process

Sakrapee Paisalnan1, Yashar Moshfeghi2, Frank Pollick1

1University of Glasgow, UK; 2University of Strathclyde, UK

In a search process, searchers review documents to gather information relevant to their information need (IN). During this process, searchers may experience the satisfaction of their IN, indicating they have gathered adequate relevant information to answer their need. This complex concept of satisfaction is the ultimate goal of search systems. Most studies in Information Retrieval have been attempted to understand how searchers’ needs are satisfied based on behavioural observation. However, the psychophysiological manifestation during the moment of satisfaction still remains unclear. Here, we use functional Magnetic Resonance (fMRI) to investigate which brain regions are involved during the moment of satisfaction. Twenty-six participants participated in the experiment, designed to represent a search process while being scanned. Our result shows the human brain regions involved during the moment of satisfaction. These findings provide an important step in unravelling the concept of satisfaction in a search process.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmGrowing the iFederation: Leveraging the ASIS&T, ALISE, and the iSchools Collaboration to Advance Information Science
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 342 / [Single Presentation of ID 342]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: ifederation, ALISE, ischool

Brian Detlor1, Sandra Hirsh2, Michael Seadle3

1McMaster University, Canada; 2San Jose State University, USA; 3iSchools Organization, Inc.

The iFederation is a joint initiative between ASIS&T, ALISE, and the iSchools to mutually cooperate and promote information science and related disciplines. During this panel session, each of the three partner organizations within the iFederation will describe their own association’s strategic directions and their views on how they envision themselves mutually cooperating and promoting information science with the other two iFederation associations. The panel will start with a quick overview of the current Memorandum of Understanding signed between the three founding iFederation associations, followed by a short overview of each association’s strategic plans and ideas for iFederation collaborations. This will be followed by a lengthy discussion with audience attendees in regards to their perspectives on how best to move the iFederation forward in a way that is mutually beneficial to all.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmQuality, Reuse, and Governance of Open Data (SIG-OIM)
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 133 / [Single Presentation of ID 133]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Open data, Data quality, Data reuse, Data governance, Open government

Fang Wang1, Hongzhi Zhu1, Yejun Wu2

1Nankai University, People's Republic of China; 2Louisiana State University, USA

In recent years, the amount of open data from governments and academic communities have increased rapidly. Open data are expected to promote the transparency and accountability of governments and academic communities, enable public participation, and facilitate digital innovation. However, open data are still facing problems such as unsatisfactory quality, insufficient data governance, increasing preservation cost and ineffective data reuse at present. This panel will invite experts in related fields to discuss the quality, reuse, and governance of open data, and propose feasible solutions from an international perspective. We will verify and promote the action plan in practice, and have more academic discussion with ASIS&T and relevant academic communities.

 
11:00am - 12:30pm“Unity in Diversity”: A Conversation Around the Interdisciplinary Identity of Information Science
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 134 / [Single Presentation of ID 134]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Information science, Identity, Diversity, Interdisciplinary field, Unity in diversity

Abebe Rorissa2, Hemalata Iyer1, Devendra Potnis2, Nadia Caidi3, Daniel Alemneh4

1University at Albany, SUNY, USA; 2University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA; 3University of Toronto, Canada; 4University of North Texas, USA

 
11:00am - 12:30pmPaper Session 20: Designing for Humanities Researchers
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Maria Bonn, School of Information Sciences, univesity of Illinois Urbana Champaign, USA

As time permits, moderators will facilitate reflective discussions at the end of sessions! These will be opportunities to have extra discussion on key points, synergies, and provocative elements of the papers.

 
11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 254 / PS-20: 1
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Sustainability; digital preservation; digital community archives; digital humanities; cultural heritage

“Meaning in the Present”: Understanding Sustainability for Digital Community Collections

Katrina Fenlon, Jessica Grimmer, Alia Fatima Reza, Courtnie Thurston

University of Maryland, USA

Living independently of mainstream institutions, digital community archives and digital humanities collections confront systemic barriers to medium- and long-term viability. Their sustainability tends to be undermined by shifts in technologies, resources, and communities over time. Because these collections contain irreplaceable and invaluable evidence of communities and histories that are underrepresented in cultural institutions, their fragility compromises the completeness and equity of our collective digital heritage. Partnerships between institutions and community-based collections often founder over a lack of shared understanding: of the expertise each partner brings to the table, of the scope and extent of mutual commitments, and of what sustainability even entails for a given project. This paper reports preliminary outcomes of a case study of the Lakeland Digital Archive, exploring how Lakeland’s community understands sustainability in the context of their digital archive, as part of a broader study of community-centered sustainability strategies for digital collections.



11:15am - 11:45am
ID: 239 / PS-20: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Archives; Human Information Interaction; information use; knowledge creation

From Information to Knowledge Creation in the Archive: Observing Humanities Researchers’ Information Activities

Alexandra Leigh1,2, Stephann Makri1, Alex Taylor1, Alec Mulinder2, Sarra Hamdi2

1City, University of London, UK; 2The National Archives, UK

As primary sources, archival records are a unique information source at the very heart of humanities research. However, how humanities researchers move from information to knowledge creation by making meaning from archival records has not been the focus of previous empirical research. This is surprising, as creating new knowledge through (re)interpretation of records is a core motivation and outcome of humanities research; as representations of historical and social occurrences, archival records rely on researchers’ interpretation of content, context, and structure to establish an ‘archival’ meaning of the record, before applying this meaning within their own work. Therefore, constructing knowledge from archival materials necessitates a dual process of knowledge creation to create novel insights from a hybrid interpretation of archival meaning and the researcher’s own interests. This paper presents findings from a naturalistic empirical observation of 11 humanities researchers engaging in research at a national archive, centring on key information activities that facilitate knowledge creation from archival records: Scanning, Relating, Capturing and Organising. Through these activities, scholars integrate their research aims and objectives with archival meaning to generate new insights. Deeper understanding of the nature of knowledge creation in archives can benefit archivists, archive users and systems designers alike.



11:45am - 12:00pm
ID: 122 / PS-20: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: digital humanities; usability testing; user experience; participatory design

Perceived Usability and Experience with Digital Tools in the Context of Digital Humanities Research

Jesse Du, Chris Yuen, Micah Slaughter, Annie Chen

University of Washington, USA

This paper examines differences in the user feedback of scholars with varied experience with digital tools. As part of a usability study of a historical digital collection, our team conducted semi-structured interviews with scholars with varying backgrounds. We categorized the sample into two groups, one with significant experience and one with little experience in using digital technology. Qualitative analysis of the interview data showed that users generally provided similar feedback. However, there were instances in which those with significant experience provided more design suggestions, and those with less experience expressed confusion and provided more feedback on website content. Drawing upon our findings, we provide recommendations for the usability evaluation of historical digital collections.



12:00pm - 12:15pm
ID: 169 / PS-20: 4
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Digital humanities; visualization; semi-structured interviews; research data curation

What is a Good Visualization for Digital Humanities Researchers? An Exploratory Study

Rongqian Ma, Fanghui Xiao

University of Pittsburgh, USA

Visualization in digital humanities (DH) has developed into a charged topic as increasing numbers of humanities researchers begin to work with machine-readable data. The current research literature on DH visualization has primarily approached the subject from a theoretical perspective, arguing the humanistic visualization should fundamentally differ from scientific visualization to represent the distinct nature of humanities data and inquiries. However, few studies have tried to empirically understand what it means to be a good visualization for humanities researchers and practitioners. This study aims to bridge this research gap by offering an exploratory investigation into researchers’ perceptions on visualization, particularly how they evaluate a visualization in humanities research. Through 10 semi-structured interviews with humanities scholars engaging in digital work, our study demonstrates that perceptions of a quality visualization among the humanities researchers are closely related to researchers’ purposes of using visualization and their self-confidence in visualization knowledge and skills. This study serves as a baseline for future empirical research on DH visualization and potentially informs the best practices for humanistic visualizations.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmGovernance Committee Meeting
Location: Snowbird, 2nd Floor, Marriott
12:30pm - 2:00pmProgram Committee Meeting
Location: Solitude, Lobby Level, Marriott
2:00pm - 3:30pmPaper Session 21: Information Policy
Location: Salon B, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Naresh Kumar Agarwal, Simmons University, USA
 
2:00pm - 2:30pm
ID: 267 / PS-21: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: information access, information policy, copyright, libraries, fair use/fair dealing

Controlled Digital Lending

Chad Currier, Alissa Centivany

University of Western Ontario, Canada

Libraries and library consortia are adopting controlled digital lending (CDL) as a strategy, accelerated by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, to facilitate equitable access to print collections. While advocates of CDL contend that digitize-and-lend practices reflect an incremental, technology-assisted adjustment to traditional library circulation, lending, and resource-sharing practices, opponents of CDL in the United States and Canada argue that the practice contravenes well-established copyright protections. This paper discusses current controversies surrounding CDL, its potential promise and perils, and concludes that a reasonable, equitable, and forward-looking application of copyright laws ought to insulate libraries and library consortia from exposure to liability for engaging in CDL.



2:30pm - 3:00pm
ID: 109 / PS-21: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Privacy and Ethics
Keywords: Data ethics, privacy, CiteSpace, mapping knowledge domains, co-citation analysis

Analysis of Mapping Knowledge Domains for Privacy Issues in Data Ethics Research

Yuan Gao, Jianping He

Shenzhen University, People's Republic of China

This paper is based on the Web of Science database and takes advantage of CiteSpace, a scientometric software, to conduct visualization analyses. It is found that privacy issues in data ethics have reached the research peak in the past two years. The current global research in this field is characterized by three different periods and multidisciplinary perspectives. The hotspots of this field are relatively concentrated and gradually deepened. Besides, the research in this field has moved from the theoretical stage to the practical application stage. This paper attempts to present the scientific knowledge structure, patterns and distribution of privacy issues in data ethics, exploring the global frontier hotspots, providing inspiration and experience for Chinese academic research and industry practice in data ethics.



3:00pm - 3:30pm
ID: 126 / PS-21: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Privacy and Ethics
Keywords: information policy, 9/11, Trump, COVID-19, policy-making processes

Ecstasy and Entropy: Information Policy in a Punctuated System

Sandra Braman

Texas A&M University, USA

Three punctuations of US information policy in the 21st century, caused by 9/11, Trump, and COVID-19, have wrought such change that the domain is currently ecstatic and entropic. This paper introduces the three punctuations, discusses how punctuations affect policy-making in complex adaptive systems, and reviews what it means for policy and policy-making processes to be ecstatic and entropic. The paper than examines manifestations of these characteristics of contemporary information policy in theories, principles, issue areas, regulatory subjects, and policy-making processes.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmPaper Session 22: Engagement and Representation, Online and Offline
Location: Salon C, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Steven Hardin, Indiana State University, USA
 
2:00pm - 2:30pm
ID: 130 / PS-22: 1
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: personal archiving, social media, gender

Revisiting and Hiding Posts: Personal Archiving on Facebook

Benedict Olgado1,2, Ces Archae Buenavista1, Beatrice Tan1

1University of the Philippines, Philippines; 2University of California, Irvine, USA

Our exploratory quantitative research show that users consider Facebook as a personal archive even if they perceive the platform to be only moderately useful or stable. In this personal archive, users are likely to revisit old posts but are unlikely to repost them. They are likely to hide old posts but are unlikely to edit them. Unlike previous studies that assert gender differences on social media activities, we found that there are no statistically significant differences between users who self-identify as female and those who self-identify as male when it comes to revisiting, reposting, editing, or deleting old posts. Self-identifying females, however, were more likely to hide posts than males. Our study points to extending how we think of and practice archiving in personal ways on social media platforms, acknowledging that a new generation of users may possibly conceive of archiving differently given the sociotechnical systems they engage with and the nature of recordmaking practices they employ.



2:30pm - 3:00pm
ID: 163 / PS-22: 2
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Information practices, Knowledge Wanghong, Online celebrity, Perceived attractiveness, Self-branding

Exploring the Perceived Attractiveness of Online Celebrities Who Sell Knowledge: A Self-Branding Perspective

Xiaoyu Chen, Alton Y.K. Chua

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Given the limited understanding of the attractiveness among online celebrities, this study explores the perceived attractiveness of “Knowledge Wanghong,” an emerging class of online celebrities who sell knowledge products in China. Drawing on the self-branding perspective, which argues that individuals may construct and manage their distinctive online image deliberately through various information practices, as the theoretical lens, we attempt to answer two questions: (1) What are the antecedents of the perceived attractiveness of Knowledge Wanghong? (2) How do Knowledge Wanghong make themselves attractive to users? From semi-structured interviews with 28 Knowledge Wanghong, we derive two findings. First, the antecedents of the perceived attractiveness include perceived professionalism, perceived familiarity, and perceived intimacy. Second, Knowledge Wanghong make themselves appealing to users in two ways: (1) they disclose personal and professional information to users; (2) they employ multiple approaches to interacting with users. This study sheds light on the perceived attractiveness of Knowledge Wanghong in terms of the antecedents and how it is achieved. Also, it provides a novel reference point for discussing the information practices of online celebrities in a global context.



3:00pm - 3:30pm
ID: 105 / PS-22: 3
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: youth civic engagement; social network; digital citizenship; weak tie theory

Social Connections Matter: Online and Offline Civic Engagement Among College Students

Shihui Feng, Mengqian Li, Ola Erstad

University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

This research examines civic engagement from both online and offline perspectives using 371 samples collected from two universities in China. We aimed to explore the effects of college students’ social connections on their online and offline civic engagement using partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). We found that weak ties in college students’ civic discussion networks play a significant role in affecting both online and offline civic engagement. Additionally, students’ characteristics, such as academic year, leadership role, and party membership, are associated with offline civic engagement, but not with online civic engagement. Political efficacy was also found to be a significant factor affecting both online and offline civic engagement. This study examines the weak tie theory in the context of online and offline civic engagement, sheds light on underlying principles for engaging young adults in civic life in the digital era, and advocates the importance of developing a blended approach for engaging college students in civic engagement in both online and offline settings.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmDocumenting Information Processes and Practices: Paradata, Provenance Metadata, Life-Cycles, and Pipelines
Location: Salon H, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 181 / [Single Presentation of ID 181]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: pipelines; processes; practices; paradata; provenance metadata

Isto Huvila1, Jane Greenberg2, Olle Sköld1, Andrea Thomer3, Ciaran Trace4, Xintong Zhao2

1Uppsala University, Sweden; 2Drexel University, USA; 3University of Michigan, USA; 4The University of Texas at Austin, USA

Processes and practices are pertinent elements of the information landscape. This panel presents research on documentation and description of processes and practices in the information field addressing: 1) how different conceptualizations of processes and practices influence how they emerge as describable entities; 2) what different approaches to document and describe processes and practices exist and have been proposed in information science and technology research; 3) what aspects of processes and practices different documentation approaches capture, make visible and invisible; and 4) what novel insights from the current state-of-the-art research can be drawn to support practitioners in different areas of the information field, including knowledge organization, information management, information literacy instruction, and development of information systems and services.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmSocial Media, Vaccines, and Partisan Division of Health Information (SIG-SM)
Location: Salon I, Lobby Level, Marriott
 
ID: 194 / [Single Presentation of ID 194]: 1
Panels
90 minutes
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Social Media, Vaccine, Health Information Behavior, Politics

Loni Hagen1, Devon Greyson2, Ashley Fox3, Kolina Koltai4, Catherine Dumas5

1University of South Florida, USA; 2University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA; 3University at Albany, SUNY, USA; 4University of Washington, USA; 5Simmons University, USA

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmPaper Session 23: Data and Representation
Location: Salon J, Lobby Level, Marriott
Session Chair: Jian Qin, Syracuse University, USA
 
2:00pm - 2:15pm
ID: 155 / PS-23: 1
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Future work sentences; Construction of task systems; Content analysis

Using Future Work Sentences to Explore Research Trends of Different Tasks in a Special Domain

Yuchen Qian, Zhicheng Li, Wenke Hao, Yuzhuo Wang, Chengzhi Zhang

Nanjing University of Science and Technology, People's Republic of China

Research trend detection is an important topic for scientific researchers. Future work sentences (FWS) , as direct descriptions of future research, aren’t fully utilized in research trend detection. Therefore, this article uses FWS to investigate research trends of different tasks in a particular domain. Taking the conference papers in the natural language processing (NLP) field as our research objects, we obtain the FWS in each paper to build the corpus and classified them into 6 main types. After that, the task of each paper is annotated, and a task system with 29 categories is constructed to compare the FWS in different tasks. The results show that the proportion of method mentioned in FWS is the highest, and different tasks focus on different FWS types: emerging tasks need more resources, while mature tasks prefer method and application. This study provides researchers a reference to understand the research trend of specific tasks and is helpful to compare different tasks.



2:15pm - 2:30pm
ID: 162 / PS-23: 2
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Information Theory
Keywords: Bibliographic Entities; BIBFRAME; Linked Data; Data Mining; Fp-growth

Publisher References in Bibliographic Entity Descriptions

Jim Hahn

University of Pennsylvania, USA

This paper describes a method for improved access to publisher references in linked data RDF editors using data mining techniques and a large corpus of library metadata encoded in the MARC21 standard. The corpus is comprised of clustered sets of publishers and publisher locations from the library MARC21 records found in the Platform for Open Data (POD). POD is a data aggregation project involving member institutions of the IvyPlus Library Confederation and contains seventy million MARC21 records, forty million of which are unique. The discovery of publisher entity sets described forms the basis for the streamlined description of BIBFRAME Instance entities. The result of this work includes a database of association rules and RDF editor improvements. The association rules are the basis of a prototype autosuggestion feature of BIBFRAME Instance entity description properties designed specifically to support the auto-population of publisher entities in linked data RDF editors.



2:30pm - 2:45pm
ID: 124 / PS-23: 3
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Archival item-level metadata, named entity disambiguation, Wikidata, linked data, entity management

Named Entity Disambiguation for Archival Collections: Metadata, Wikidata, and Linked Data

Katherine Polley, Vivian Tompkins, Brendan Honick, Jian Qin

Syracuse University, USA

Representing archival metadata as linked data can increase the findability and usability of items, and linked data sources such as Wikidata can be used to further enrich existing collection metadata. However, a central challenge to this process is the named entity disambiguation or entity linking that is required to ensure that the named entities in a collection are being properly matched to Wikidata entities so that any additional metadata is applied correctly. This paper details our experimentation with one entity linking system called OpenTapioca, which was chosen for its use of Wikidata and its accessibility to librarians and archivists with minimal technical intervention. We discuss the results of using OpenTapioca for named entity disambiguation on the Belfer Cylinders Collection from the Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University, highlighting the successes and limitations of the system and of using Wikidata as a knowledge base.



2:45pm - 3:00pm
ID: 170 / PS-23: 4
Short Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Subject representation, Metadata evaluation, Metadata change, Bibliographic metadata

Patterns of Subject Metadata Change in MARC 21 Bibliographic Records for Video Recordings

Vyacheslav Zavalin1, Oksana Zavalina2, Rachel Safa1

1Texas Woman's University, USA; 2University of North Texas, USA

Study reported in this paper analyzed over 20 thousand of machine-readable library metadata records in MARC 21 bibliographic format that are based on Resource Description and Access (RDA) standard. The focus of this analysis is on change in subject metadata – data elements designed for representing the aboutness of information objects – over a 6-year period between 2014 and 2020. The analyzed dataset is the entire population of the records representing English-language video recordings in DVD format in WorldCat database as of one year after official transition to RDA data content standard in library metadata creation. Analysis of metadata representing audiovisual materials is needed as audiovisual metadata practices tend to differ from those for other materials due to high occurrence of unique resources. The study includes quantitative and qualitative analyses into the change in the application of data elements (fields and subfields) over time and categorizes the observed change.



3:00pm - 3:30pm
ID: 231 / PS-23: 5
Long Papers
Confirmation 1: I/we agree if this paper/presentation is accepted, all authors/panelists listed as “presenters” will present during the Annual Meeting and will pay and register at least for the day of the presentation.
Confirmation 2: I/we further agree presenting authors/panelists who have not registered on or before the early bird registration deadline will be removed from the conference program, and their paper will be removed from the Proceedings.
Confirmation 3: I/we acknowledge that all session authors/presenters have read and agree to the ASIS&T Annual Meeting Policies found at https://www.asist.org/am21/submission-types-instructions/
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Social media, misinformation, digital forensics, image compression, memes

Forensic Analysis of Memetic Image Propagation: Introducing the SMOC BRISQUEt Method

James Hodges1, Mitch Chaiet2, Praful Gupta1

1The University of Texas at Austin, USA; 2Harvard Kennedy School Shorenstein Center, USA

This paper introduces a mixed-methods approach for forensically reconstructing the propagation of visual media via networked digital devices. The authors present case studies drawn from political misinformation around the January 6, 2021 riots at the U.S. Capitol. Using interpretive analysis, the authors identify traces of user interfaces that remain in images being shared about the riots. Using computational analysis, the authors evaluate compression levels in digital photographs of the events in question, thus identifying which instances of the image are closer to the source (as well as which images appear to be identical). By combining these two approaches, the authors argue that SMOC BRISQUEt refines our understanding of misinformation’s memetic spread.

 
3:30pm - 3:45pmCoffee Break
Location: Ballroom Prefunction, Lobby Level, Marriott
3:45pm - 4:45pmClosing Plenary: Keynote Address by Dr. Maia Hightower: "Healthcare IT Equity Model: A Framework for Digital Equity"
Location: Salons D-E, Lobby Level, Marriott

Maia Hightower, MD, MPH, MBA is the Chief Medical Information Officer and Sr. Director Health Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion for The University of Utah Health. She joined the UUH team in March of 2019. Prior to joining the University of Utah Health team, she was the Chief Medical Information Officer and Interim Chief Population Health Officer for The University of Iowa Health Care. She joined the faculty of the University of Iowa’s Carver College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine in August of 2015, after serving as Associate Medical Director for Stanford Health Care’s University Healthcare Alliance. Dr. Hightower received her Medical Degree, as well as a Master of Public Health, from the University of Rochester School of Medicine, followed by residencies in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at the University of California, San Diego. She also holds an MBA from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. As UUH’s Chief Medical Information Officer, Dr. Hightower and her teams transform data into value and drive the exceptional digital experience for patients, faculty, staff, and students. Her teams include the enterprise data warehouse, provider informatics, data science services, FHIR clinical applications, and virtual care that support University of Utah Hospitals and Clinics, University of Utah School of Medicine, and University of Utah Health Sciences. Dr. Hightower is a champion for health equity, diversity, and inclusion awareness and initiatives. She developed the Healthcare IT Equity Maturity Model (HITEM) to dismantle structural bias hardwired in healthcare IT and develop an inclusive and equity minded healthcare IT culture. She was recently nominated and accepted into The Leverage Network’s 4th Healthcare Board Initiative (HcBI) Program to enhance the preparedness of Black executives for governance roles in the healthcare industry. Dr. Hightower was recently recognized by Health Data Management as one of the “Most Powerful Women in Healthcare IT” and “25 leading CMIOs at healthcare organizations.” She was recognized by Becker’s Hospital Review as one of “50 hospital and health system CMIOs to know 2017”.

COVID-19 has accelerated digital transformation across industries, including healthcare, health consumer facing technology and digital access to healthcare services. Without addressing structural inequity and bias in healthcare IT (HIT), we risk “digital redlining”, increasing the disadvantage and decreasing the value of digital transformation among already marginalized communities. The Healthcare IT Equity model (HITEM), provides a change management framework for leaders to develop a multi-year strategy and continuous improvement processes to address organizational structural bias in healthcare IT (HIT), impact healthcare inequities, and develop an equity minded culture. Components of the HITEM model that will be highlighted with examples from the University of Utah Health (UUH) include (1) auditing healthcare algorithms for bias; (2) measuring health outcome disparities using a standard data definition; (3) developing an inclusive HIT culture; HITEM lessons learned can be broadly applied across industries that effect social determinants of health, including the work place, education, technology, and finance.

5:00pm - 6:30pmVirtual Poster Session

The virtual poster session will be done with zoom and a link will be provided at a later date.

6:30pm - 8:30pmAwards Banquet
Location: Salons D-E, Lobby Level, Marriott

 
Contact and Legal Notice · Contact Address:
Privacy Statement · Conference: ASIS&T 2021
Conference Software - ConfTool Pro 2.6.143+TC
© 2001–2022 by Dr. H. Weinreich, Hamburg, Germany