Conference Agenda (All times are shown in EDT)

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
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Session Overview
Date: Thursday, 22/Oct/2020
8:00am - 12:00pmPart 1: Metrics 2020: Workshop on Informetric and Scientometric Research (SIG-MET)
 
 
ID: 218 / Work 01-1: 1
Workshops
8 hours
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: SIG/MET, informetrics, scientometrics, bibliometrics, webometrics, altmetrics, workshop.

Metrics 2020: Workshop on Informetric and Scientometric Research (SIG-MET)

Shenmeng Xu1, Fei Shu2,3, Philippe Mongeon4

1University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, U.S.A.; 2Hangzhou Dianzi University, China; 3Université de Montréal, Canada; 4Aarhus University, Denmark

This full-day, 2-part workshop will be devoted to informetrics and scientometrics research. It will provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of research and applications, including new theoretical approaches, indicators, and tools among young and established researchers, Ph.D. students, information professionals and librarians active in the field of informetrics and scientometrics.

 
1:00pm - 5:00pmPart 1: Conceptual Models in Sociotechnical Systems
 
 
ID: 186 / Work 02: 1
Workshops
8 hours
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Conceptual Models, Sociotechnical Systems, Information Science, Critical Studies

Conceptual Models in Sociotechnical Systems

Nicholas Weber1, Katrina Fenlon2, Peter Organisciak3, Andrea K. Thomer4, Amelia Acker5, Ryan Shaw6

1University of Washington, USA; 2University of Maryland, USA; 3Denver University, USA; 4University of Michigan, USA; 5University of Texas, USA; 6University of North Carolina, USA

Conceptual models -- the representation of how a system works, as well as the information objects they process and transmit -- are fundamental to the construction, maintenance, and use of digital infrastructures that mutually constitute people and technology (the sociotechnical). Although conceptual models are critical to sociotechnical systems, they are often overlooked or under-described in information science research. This full day workshop will convene practitioners and researchers working towards the critical study of conceptual models in sociotechnical systems. In-progress research papers will be workshopped through presentations and discussion amongst participants, and two experts in the field will deliver keynote lectures. The outcomes of this workshop will include a white paper co-authored by participants, as well as the publication of proceedings in an open-access preprint repository.

 
Date: Friday, 23/Oct/2020
8:00am - 12:00pmPart 2: Metrics 2020: Workshop on Informetric and Scientometric Research (SIG-MET)
 
 
ID: 218 / Work 01-1: 1
Workshops
8 hours
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: SIG/MET, informetrics, scientometrics, bibliometrics, webometrics, altmetrics, workshop.

Metrics 2020: Workshop on Informetric and Scientometric Research (SIG-MET)

Shenmeng Xu1, Fei Shu2,3, Philippe Mongeon4

1University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, U.S.A.; 2Hangzhou Dianzi University, China; 3Université de Montréal, Canada; 4Aarhus University, Denmark

This full-day, 2-part workshop will be devoted to informetrics and scientometrics research. It will provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of research and applications, including new theoretical approaches, indicators, and tools among young and established researchers, Ph.D. students, information professionals and librarians active in the field of informetrics and scientometrics.

 
1:00pm - 5:00pmPart 2: Conceptual Models in Sociotechnical Systems
 
 
ID: 186 / Work 02: 1
Workshops
8 hours
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Conceptual Models, Sociotechnical Systems, Information Science, Critical Studies

Conceptual Models in Sociotechnical Systems

Nicholas Weber1, Katrina Fenlon2, Peter Organisciak3, Andrea K. Thomer4, Amelia Acker5, Ryan Shaw6

1University of Washington, USA; 2University of Maryland, USA; 3Denver University, USA; 4University of Michigan, USA; 5University of Texas, USA; 6University of North Carolina, USA

Conceptual models -- the representation of how a system works, as well as the information objects they process and transmit -- are fundamental to the construction, maintenance, and use of digital infrastructures that mutually constitute people and technology (the sociotechnical). Although conceptual models are critical to sociotechnical systems, they are often overlooked or under-described in information science research. This full day workshop will convene practitioners and researchers working towards the critical study of conceptual models in sociotechnical systems. In-progress research papers will be workshopped through presentations and discussion amongst participants, and two experts in the field will deliver keynote lectures. The outcomes of this workshop will include a white paper co-authored by participants, as well as the publication of proceedings in an open-access preprint repository.

 
Date: Saturday, 24/Oct/2020
8:00am - 12:00pmDoctoral Colloquium
 
8:00am - 12:00pmICT for Development, Empowerment for Growth: How Can the Information Field Contribute?
 
 
ID: 228 / [Single Presentation of ID 228]: 1
Workshops
4 hours
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: information and communications technology; development; ICT4D; information field

Yuxiang {Chris} Zhao1, Jia Tina Du2, Javed Mostafa3, Natalie Pang4, Hui Yan5, Gillian Oliver6, Shijie Song7

1Nanjing University of Science and Technology, People's Republic of China; 2University of South Australia, Australia; 3The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA; 4National University of Singapore, Singapore; 5Renmin University of China, China; 6Monash University, Australia; 7Nanjing University, China

Information and communications technology for development (ICT4D), which is devoted to leveraging ICT for economic, social, and governance development, has attracted wide attention from scholars and practitioners. However, gaps remain to be addressed in terms of bridging the connections between information, technological development and adoption, and people for development. Through this workshop, we will develop research ideas and foster collaboration opportunities across information fields, which will lay the groundwork for a JASIST special issue on ICT4D. The ASIS&T Annual Meeting provides an excellent forum to discuss this crucial area together with the academics and industry peers.

 
1:00pm - 6:00pmGrand Challenges in Information Behavior Research: Theory (SIG-USE)
 
 
ID: 359 / [Single Presentation of ID 359]: 1
Workshops
4 hours
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Information behavior, information practices, information theories, scholarly communication

Xiaofeng Li1, Jiqun Liu2, Rebekah Willson3

1Clarion University, USA; 2Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, USA; 3McGill University, Canada

The 20th Annual SIG-USE Research Symposium focuses on the grant challenges in information behavior and information practices research. This workshop is an opportunity for researchers, students, faculty, and information professionals who are interested in information behavior and information practices research to discuss the grand challenges of theory development in these areas. The workshop will facilitate information exchange among scholars and information professionals, provide a place for those new to information behavior and practices to engage critically with the field, and allow both scholars and practitioners to get feedback on preliminary and ongoing work. It will feature a dynamic panel and full paper presentations to explore different development and challenges in information behavior and practices research. The symposium also offers a unique mini workshop for authors who are interested in submitting their works to the JASIST special issue on Information Behavior and Information Practices Theory.

 
Date: Sunday, 25/Oct/2020
9:00am - 10:30amOpening Plenary Keynote by Houman Haddad: Depoliticizing Information Through Blockchain

Houman Haddad is the Head of Emerging Technologies at the United Nations World Food Program (WFP). Houman is the founder of WFP’s “Building Blocks” (BB) project, which seeks to harness the power of blockchain to foster interagency collaboration and create efficiencies. Building Blocks is the world’s largest implementation of blockchain technology for humanitarian assistance, currently serving 700,000 Syrian and Rohingya refugees in Jordan and Bangladesh. Blockchain technology also has the potential to empower the vulnerable through financial inclusion and digital identities. Houman joined WFP in 2010 and, prior to WFP, worked in Canada’s banking sector.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmConsidering Individual and Community Contexts Within Information Pedagogy, Scholarship, and Practice [SDG 4]
 
 
ID: 156 / [Single Presentation of ID 156]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: information contexts, pedagogy, information organization, information communities

Ana Roeschley1, Sarah A. Buchanan2, Mary Burke1, Ann Graf3, Oksana L. Zavalina1

1University of North Texas, USA; 2University of Missouri, USA; 3Simmons University, USA

Context --“the complex web of social relations which [the individual] inhabits” (Spratt and Florian, 2015, p.90) touches everything, including individual and group circumstances, positionalities, feelings, experiences, and environments. Context forms not only how we communicate information in the field and in the classroom. Individual and community contexts affect the processes of searching for information, accessing information, and the interpretation and use of information. (Encheva, 2016; Mitchell, 2017; Yeo et al, 2015). Furthermore, such contexts affect how information scientists teach and conduct their research and how information (in a classroom setting or otherwise) can be delivered to individuals and communities for action. How we, as information scholars and professionals, take individual and community contexts into account will affect our work. Issues of context will be thoroughly interrogated from a number of different perspectives by both the panelists and audience members in this interactive and participation-based session.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmInfrastructures of Digital Humanities [SDGs 12, 17]
 
 
ID: 199 / [Single Presentation of ID 199]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: digital humanities, collaboration, disciplinarity, education, management

Chris A. Sula1, Kalani Craig2, Michelle Dalmau2, Alex Humphreys3, Eero Hyvönen4, Humphrey Keah5, Joseph Kiplang’at6, Thea Lindquist7, Nicholas Weber8

1Pratt Institute, USA; 2Indiana University Bloomington, USA; 3JSTOR Labs at ITHAKA, USA; 4University of Helsinki, Finland; 5Centre for Health Literacy and Quality, Kenya; 6Moi University, Eldoret Kenya; 7University of Colorado Boulder, USA; 8University of Washington, USA

This panel will convene participants from a range of roles and institutions to build on previous work in infrastructures of digital humanities: the organizational and structural aspects of the field responsible for collaboration, partnership, training and support, access, impact, preservation, sustainability, and more. Information professionals play a key role in these infrastructures, from technical expertise to project management to training and support for methods and tools. Panelists from faculty, centers and institutes, and academic and digital libraries will address issues of capacity building, disciplinarity, project management, and labor across various settings.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmPaper Session 01: Information and Technology [SDGs 4,12]
Session Chair: Dietmar Wolfram, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, United States of America
 
 
11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 145 / PS-01: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: virtual reality, library programming, informal learning, social engagement, digital media

Librarian Perspectives on the Role of Virtual Reality in Public Libraries

Kung Jin Lee1, W.E. King1, Negin Dahya2, Jin Ha Lee1

1University of Washington, USA; 2University of Toronto, Canada

This paper explores librarians’ perception of virtual reality as well as opportunities and challenges associated with implementing VR in public libraries. We interviewed 36 librarians who developed and offered VR programs as part of the research project, before and after the programming. The findings show how VR is used in the library in the focus as a learning tool and to be used as a social tool. Across the interviews, librarians talk about how the immersion and interactivity of what VR has to offer is different from other digital media. However, the unique qualities of VR, discussed throughout the paper, present possible challenges associated with offeringVR in the library. Librarians observed that while VR has a lot of potential as a technology for learning and social engagement it also depends on the different content being provided. The librarians felt that this criteria has yet been achieved. In addition, each librarian had a different understanding of what constitutes learning.



11:15am - 11:30am
ID: 221 / PS-01: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Digital library, user-centred design, user experience, interface, instrumental and non-instrumental quality, mood

Evaluating the User Experience in a Digital Library

Maram Barifah1, Monica Landoni1, Ayman Eddakrouri2

1USI, Switzerland; 2Effat University, Saudi Arabia

Digital libraries (DL) have been evaluated through two main meth- ods: implicitly by analyzing the query behavior extracted from the log files (LF), and explicitly by conducting user studies and usability tests. Unfortunately, such techniques fail to provide a full understanding of the quality of the user experience (UX). Re- cently, researchers called for developing measurements that are more meaningful by considering UX which is gaining momentum as a critical success factor across all sectors. UX is considered as the ultimate criterion of the user-centered design. This paper tries to fill this gap by adapting Mahlke’s interaction user experience frame- work to DL. A laboratory user study with 65 undergraduate students was conducted. Three data collection tools were considered: ques- tionnaires, screen recording, and pick-a-mode scale. The findings of the study indicate that considering the UX when evaluating the DL provides more insights of different aspects of the user interactions, perceptions and affective variables. The need to improve the DL system and simplify its interface still persists. Revisiting interfaces by visualizing the functions is a possible solution.



11:30am - 11:40am
ID: 143 / PS-01: 3
Short Papers
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: cross-lingual plagiarism detection, cross-lingual word embedding, word mover's distance

Employing Word Mover’s Distance for Cross-Lingual Plagiarized Text Detection

Chia-Ming Chang, Chia-Hsuan Chang, San-Yih Hwang

National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan

While the blossom of globalization has achieved many successes, cross-lingual plagiarism, however, has become popular. Detecting plagiarism across languages requires the capability of comparing semantical similarities between texts of different languages. Previous works rely on massive bilingual resources such as comparable corpus, parallel corpus, and even commercial machine translation as references. However, towards domain-specific applications, collecting such resources is labor-intensive and impractical. Also, the absence of interpretability of existing methods lead to the difficulty of investigating retrieval results by humans. Hence, it is imperative to have a resource-light and interpretable method for cross-lingual plagiarism detection. In this study, we propose a new detection method, called CL-WMD, which is built upon word embedding techniques. CL-WMD requires only a small set of translation pairs to constitute a bilingual reference and calculates semantical distances between texts by word mover’s distance, which can provide explicable word alignment information between two compared text spans. Our experiments are conducted under a bilingual scientific publication corpus composed of two typologically diverse languages: English and Chinese. The results demonstrate that CL-WMD has higher accuracy than most existing methods and achieves better or comparable performance when compared to the translation-based method in paragraph-level and sentence-level plagiarism detection tasks.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmPaper Session 02: COVID-19 [SDG 3]
Session Chair: Rong Tang, Simmons College, United States of America
 
 
11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 272 / PS-02: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: linguistic register, ISO12620, and clustering, visualization

Searching Covid-19 by Linguistic Register: Parallels and Warrant for a New Retrieval Model

Gerald Benoit

UC Berkeley, USA

Keeping informed given rapid trend in data and resources about covid-19 is a new challenge. Different user groups (researchers/doctors, practitioners, public) vary in linguistic expression and vocabulary so a new retrieval framework might likewise vary to improve retrieval, expose unanticipated concepts, and establish a sustainable research stream. In this project a document collection about covid-19 was created, parsed according to ISO12620’s definition of linguistic register, and retrieval sets compared. Results suggest trends from other fields parallel register-oriented criteria; project exposes unexpected concepts across groups, uses of visualization, and warrants ling-register as a sustainable IR research stream.



11:15am - 11:30am
ID: 336 / PS-02: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: COVID-19, Information flows, Information environment, Research, Practice

What We Can Learn from Information Flows About COVID-19: Implications for Research and Practice

Waseem Afzal

Charles Sturt University, Australia

COVID-19 has become a global pandemic affecting billions of people. Its impact on societies worldwide will be felt for years to come. The purpose of this research is to examine information flows about COVID-19 to understand the information-specific underpinnings that are shaping understandings of this crisis. As a starting point, this research analyzes information about COVID-19 from a selection of information sources, including the World Health Organization (WHO), the National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China (NHCPRC), and three news outlets with vast global coverage. The analysis reveals some distinctive information underpinnings about COVID-19, including 1) flows of information becoming regular and larger around certain dates, 2) preponderance of information imperfections such as incomplete information, misinformation, and disinformation, and 3) absence of information about some key turning points. The implications of these information imperfections in that they create information failures and, hence, ineffective approaches to dealing with this crisis warrant further investigation.



11:30am - 11:45am
ID: 350 / PS-02: 3
Long Papers
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Information diffusion, network analysis, epidemic modeling, social media, COVID-19

COVID-19 Epidemic and Information Diffusion Analysis on Twitter

Ly Dinh, Nikolaus Parulian

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted all aspects of our life, including the information spread on social media. Prior literature has found that information diffusion dynamics on social networks mirror that of a virus, but applying the epidemic Susceptible-Infected-Removed model (SIR) model to examine how information spread is not sufficient to claim that information spreads like a virus. In this study, we explore whether there are similarities in the simulated SIR model (SIRsim), observed SIR model based on actual COVID-19 cases (SIRemp), and observed information cascades on Twitter about the virus (INFOcas) by using network analysis and diffusion modeling. We propose three primary research questions: (1) What are the diffusion patterns of COVID-19 virus spread, based on SIRsim and SIRemp?; (2) What are the diffusion patterns of information cascades on Twitter (INFOcas), with respect to retweets, quote tweets, and replies?; and (3) What are the major differences in diffusion patterns between SIRsim, SIRemp, and INFOcas? Our study makes a contribution to the information sciences community by showing how epidemic modeling of virus and information diffusion analysis of online social media are distinct but interrelated concepts.



11:45am - 11:55am
ID: 155 / PS-02: 4
Short Papers
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: topic modeling, COVID-19, Twitter, temporal differences

Uncovering Temporal Differences in COVID-19 Tweets

Han Zheng, Dion Hoe-Lian Goh, Chei Sian Lee, Edmund Lee, Yin Leng Theng

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

In the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic, understanding how the public responds to various initiatives is an important step in assessing current and future policy implementations. In this paper, we analyzed Twitter tweets using topic modeling to uncover the issues surrounding people’s discussion of the disease. Our focus was on temporal differences in topics, prior and after the declaration of COVID-19 as a pandemic. Nine topics were identified in our analysis, each of which showed distinct levels of discussion over time. Our results suggest that as the pandemic progresses, the concerns of the public vary as new developments come to light.



11:55am - 12:05pm
ID: 316 / PS-02: 5
Short Papers
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: COVID-19, Coronavirus, Pandemic, Twitter, Hate Speech

Stigmatization in Social Media: Documenting and Analyzing Hate Speech for COVID-19 on Twitter

Lizhou Fan1,2, Huizi Yu2,4, Zhanyuan Yin3,4

1Program in Digital Humanities, UCLA,USA; 2Department of Statistics, UCLA, USA; 3Department of Mathematics, UCLA, USA; 4Department of Economics, UCLA, USA

As the COVID-19 pandemic has unfolded, Hate Speech on social media about China and Chinese people has encouraged social stigmatization. For the historical and humanistic purposes, this history-in-the-making needs to be archived and analyzed. Using the query “china+and+coronavirus” to scrape from the Twitter API, we have obtained 3,457,402 key tweets about China relating to COVID-19. In this archive, in which about 40% of the tweets are from the U.S., we identify 25,467 Hate Speech occurrences and analyze them according to lexicon-based emotions and demographics using machine learning and network methods. The results indicate that there are substantial associations between the amount of Hate Speech and demonstrations of sentiments, and state demographics factors. Sentiments of surprise and fear associated with poverty and unemployment rates are prominent. This digital archive and the related analyses are not simply historical, therefore. They play vital roles in raising public awareness and mitigating future crises. Consequently, we regard our research as a pilot study in methods of analysis that might be used by other researchers in various fields.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmPaper Session 03: Reducing Inequities [SDGs 10, 11, 12, 16]
Session Chair: Heidi Julien, SUNY at Buffalo, United States of America
 
 
11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 209 / PS-03: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: persona profiles, libraries, museums, information seeking, sustainable development, Latinx in the USA

Persona Profiles of Latinx Living in Boston: Applications for Information Organizations

Mónica Colón-Aguirre1, Janet Ceja Alcalá2

1East Carolina University, USA; 2Simmons University, USA

Based on data and initial findings of a larger phenomenological project focused on the experiences of Latinx living in the Boston area, the researchers create two persona profiles. Preliminary results of the analysis of 13 interviews with members of the Latinx community in Boston identified two distinct groups among the participants. These groups were defined by socioeconomic class, as identified by two main indicators: educational attainment and English language skills. Those belonging to the lower socioeconomic class had low educational attainment and limited English language skills compared to those in the middle socioeconomic class group which was made up of Latinx who had high educational attainment and were fully bilingual. The persona profiles created using the data provided by the interviews have potential applications for those working in information organizations, and help researchers and practitioners in information organizations design better services for urban Latinx communities which take into consideration complex issues which affect daily life. This approach aligns with the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which among many goals, intends to make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.

Keywords: persona profiles, libraries, museums, information seeking, sustainable development, Latinx in the USA



11:15am - 11:30am
ID: 225 / PS-03: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Information Theory
Keywords: taxonomy alignment, taxonomy, indigenous, knowledge organization

Reconciling Taxonomies of Electoral Constituencies and Recognized Tribes of Indigenous Taiwan

Jessica Yi-Yun Cheng, Bertram Ludaescher

University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, USA

Over the years, information science professionals have been studying biases in Knowledge Organization Systems (KOS), e.g. bibliographic classifications. The robustness of classifications has been examined in diverse measures, ranging from the representation of race, gender, ethnic minorities, to indigenous peoples. In this study, we aim at (1) uncovering implicit assumptions about minorities in everyday taxonomies; (2) comparing and reconciling these different taxonomies. Specifically, we study the use case of Taiwanese Indigenous Peoples’ tribe classifications and the indigenous constituencies of the legislature electoral representation. We compare four finer-grained taxonomies for indigenous people with the coarse-grained indigenous peoples’ electoral constituencies that only recognize two regions (Lowland, Highland). The four taxonomies are: the recognized tribes in the past, the recognized tribes in the present, other possible tribes, and re-scaled groups based on population. We employ a logic-based taxonomy alignment approach using Region Connection Calculus (RCC-5) relations to align these taxonomies. Our results show different options when modeling and interpreting the use case of Indigenous Taiwan constituencies, and also demonstrate that multiple perspectives can be preserved and co-exist in our merged taxonomic representations.



11:30am - 11:45am
ID: 259 / PS-03: 3
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Innovation, collective information-seeking, experimentation, refugees, diversity

Supporting Refugees by Facilitating the Innovation of Nonprofit Resettlement Agencies: A Case Study

Darin S. Freeburg

University of South Carolina, USA

This study tested the implementation of the Information for Innovation model (IIM). The IIM posits that to implement innovations and adapt to external change, nonprofits must increase both the inward and outward flow of information. This increased flow comes through experimentation, information-seeking, and self-expression. Over one year, the researcher implemented the model with a refugee resettlement nonprofit in the Southeastern U.S. A case study design was used, following the approach of Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR). The implementation of the IIM followed the structure of Communities of Practice (COP), and participants held several face-to-face meetings and engaged in virtual information-seeking. Results show that increases in information-seeking improved the nonprofit’s confidence in its ability to manage change. Improvements in self-expression enabled the nonprofit to benefit more fully from the diversity of existing staff. Yet, the IIM’s impact on implementation was limited by lack of resources. This study contributes to literature on the expansion of Library and Information Science (LIS) into communities by proposing an evidence-based approach to working with nonprofits. This study also contributes to literature on the role of LIS in refugee populations, suggesting that these institutions work more directly with the nonprofits whose expertise and funding most directly supports refugees.

 
1:00pm - 2:00pmSIG-RUSH
 
2:00pm - 3:30pmChapter Assembly Meeting

Zoom Meeting ID: 926 321 2704 
Passcode: asistam20 

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmEDI and Leadership in Information Science [SDGs 10, 16, 17]
 
 
ID: 453 / [Single Presentation of ID 453]: 1
Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Accelerator Series
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: diversity

Bharat Mehra1, Renate Chancellor2, Kathleen Burnett3

1University of Alabama, USA; 2Catholic University, USA; 3Florida State University, USA

There are few leaders of color in the library and information science (LIS) professoriate (Wheeler & Smith, 2018) despite consistent discussion about the lack of diversity in the profession. There are many variables that contribute to this phenomenon including the lack of faculty of color and the field’s serious issues with mentoring, tenure, opportunities for advancement, and retention. This panel highlights new LIS leaders of color who will share their experiences and discuss their thoughts on how this dilemma might be remedied in the future. Wheeler, M. B., & Smith, D. (2018). Race and leadership in library and information science education: a study of African American administrators. Library Trends, 67(1), 23-38.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmLinked Data Education and Training: Past, Present, and Future [SDGs 4, 9]
 
 
ID: 176 / [Single Presentation of ID 176]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Linked data, Metadata, Education and training, Learning resources

Brian Dobreski1, Marcia Zeng2, Jason Kovari3, Jian Qin4

1University of Tennessee, USA; 2Kent State University, USA; 3Cornell University, USA; 4Syracuse University, USA

Studying, designing, and implementing linked data is becoming an increasingly important part of many information settings. Whether taking part in high-profile grant funded collaborations, local exploratory projects, or adopting a “wait and see” approach, institutions such as libraries, archives, and enterprise organizations will need professionals versed in linked data technologies and practices. In recent years, many advances have been made toward the establishment of an educational foundation for information professionals in this area, through both the incorporation of linked data topics into formal course curricula as well as the establishment of community-driven, open access learning resources online. However, questions and challenges remain. In this panel, presenters will explore the past, current, and future states of linked data education and training while addressing ongoing challenges and opportunities for preparing metadata professionals in this area.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmPaper Session 04: Scholarly Communication [SDGs 1-17]
Session Chair: Eric T. Meyer, University of Texas at Austin, United States of America
 
 
4:00pm - 4:15pm
ID: 123 / PS-04: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Gold open access, Article processing charge, Hotelling model, Market equilibria

Investigating the Article Processing Charge of Journals in the Gold Open Access Market: A Game Theory Approach

Xiaoqun Yuan1, Qinggong Wang1, Ming Jiang2, Yeping Liu1, Xin Yang1

1Wuhan University, People's Republic of China; 2University of Bristol, UK

As a promising solution for enhancing knowledge communication as well as alleviating financial pressure of institutional libraries, gold open access (gold OA) has attracted wide attention all over the world. But it is a hard work to fully disclose how the equilibrium article processing charge is established in the gold OA market. To deal with this challenge, this paper firstly formulates the competition among journals in this market as a three-stage Hotelling duopoly game, which is able to reveal its dynamic and competitive features affected by academic reputation, publication delays and article processing charges of journals. Then backward induction is applied to derive the market equilibria. Finally, an empirical study with 1346 journals is conducted to verify the credibility of the theoretical solutions. The results show that gold OA journal with relatively higher academic reputation and shorter publication delay could charge higher article processing charge. And the publication delays of gold OA journals tend to cluster together in a limited time interval.



4:15pm - 4:30pm
ID: 344 / PS-04: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Digital humanities, digital scholarship, sustainability, scholarly communication

Purpose, Completeness, and Evidential Source: Typological Signposts in the Collections Landscape

Katrina Fenlon, Jessica Grimmer, Courtnie Thurston

University of Maryland, College Park, USA

The diversification of digital scholarship poses significant challenges to integrating non-traditional products of humanities scholarship—ranging from digital editions and linked data aggregations to software and virtual environments—into established ecosystems for sustaining and preserving scholarly communication. Without a strong understanding of the variety of forms of digital scholarship, it is difficult to establish broadly adoptable or systematic (and therefore sustainable) approaches to managing diverse digital products throughout their lifecycles. This study illuminates a region of the landscape of digital humanities scholarship by identifying and characterizing different types of scholar-generated digital collections, which make different contributions to scholarship. Through formal typological analysis of approximately 200 scholar-generated digital humanities research collections, this study offers conceptual handles for understanding the principal purposes of digital collections, and how those are shaped by properties of collections, including their ideal completeness and evidential sources.



4:30pm - 4:40pm
ID: 237 / PS-04: 3
Short Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: university presses, e-books, cultural commodity, dissemination strategies

University Presses’ E-book Dissemination Strategies for Academic Library Customers: An Exploratory Study

Mei Zhang

Syracuse University, USA

This work-in-progress study examines university presses’ e-book dissemination strategies by focusing on how presses choose certain ways to distribute their e-books to academic library customers, and the factors supporting their decisions. The study conducted five one-on-one interviews with employees from different university presses in the U.S.. The preliminary findings reveal that although all participating university presses provided their e-books to four main vendors, these presses adopted different strategies to distribute their e-books to different vendors. Further, this study listed the factors affecting university presses’ decision on their e-book dissemination strategies, including increasing exposure of their e-books, concerns about adding new vendors, and the vendors’ imposition of DRM on e-books. Then this study, by linking the findings to the framework of cultural commodity, argues that the university presses’ dissemination strategies demonstrate their effort to reduce the fragility of their e-books as a cultural commodity.



4:40pm - 4:50pm
ID: 330 / PS-04: 4
Short Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Predatory Journals, Whitelisted Journals, Convolutional Neural Network, Model Interpretation, Website Evaluation

Don't Judge a Journal by its Cover? Appearance of a Journal's Website as Predictor of Blacklisted Open-Access Status

Lizhen Liang, Daniel Acuna

Syracuse University, USA

The nature of scientific research has motived an open-access model of publication supported by article processing fees. Under this rapidly evolving environment and financial incentives, some dubious venues would publish almost anything—for a fee. Many entities keep track of the standards of these new journals, “blacklisting” those deemed problematic. Anecdotal evidence suggests that blacklisted journals tend to have websites with subpar appearance (e.g., old web technologies, unprofessional design). In this work, we systematically explore whether this anecdotal evidence is true. In particular, we evaluate the websites of journals whitelisted and unwhitelisted by the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). We use a convolutional neural network to predict whether a journal is whitelisted based on a screenshot of its website and analyze the factors that predict one output vs. the other. Our results show that appearance is indeed a predictive factor, achieving a medium performance (AUC of 0.736). Further, our interpretation suggests that the network considers whitelisting those websites with a table of content, social media links and packed content. Conversely, our model mistakenly whitelists blacklisted journals hosted by Elsevier and blacklists whitelisted websites with sans fonts and non-Latin characters.



4:50pm - 5:00pm
ID: 341 / PS-04: 5
Short Papers
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Data Paper, Data Sharing, Data Reuse, Data Citation, Scholarly Communication

The Role of the Data Paper in Scholarly Communication

Chenyue Jiao, Peter T. Darch

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

Data sharing and reuse promise many benefits to science, but many researchers are reluctant to share and reuse data. Data papers, published as peer-reviewed articles that provide descriptive information about specific datasets, are a potential solution as they may incentivize sharing by providing a mechanism for data producers to get citation credit and support reuse by providing contextual information about dataset production. Data papers can receive many citations. However, does citation of a data paper mean reuse of the underlying dataset? This paper presents preliminary findings from a content-based citation analysis of data papers (n=103) published in two specialized data journals, one in earth sciences and one in physical and chemical sciences. We conclude that while the genre of data papers facilitates some data sharing and reuse, they fail to live up to their full potential. Further, practices of reuse of datasets from data papers vary considerably between disciplines. We propose measures for academic publishers to enhance the data paper’s role in scholarly communication to attract more attention from researchers and to inform discipline-specific policy and practices related to data publication.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmPaper Session 05: Health and Vulnerable Populations [SDG 3]
Session Chair: Ina Fourie, University of Pretoria, South Africa
 
 
4:00pm - 4:15pm
ID: 197 / PS-05: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: blind users, visual question answering, visual assistance, medication packaging

Quality of Images Showing Medication Packaging from Individuals with Vision Impairments: Implications for the Design of Visual Question Answering Applications

Nathan W. Davis, Bo Xie, Danna Gurari

University of Texas at Austin, USA

Mobile phone technology empowers individuals with vision impairment to submit images with questions in order to promptly receive descriptions or answers from remote humans through visual question answering applications. This study aimed to (1) identify challenges for visually impaired users of VizWiz, a visual question answering application, to obtain information about medication packaging and (2) recommend design guidelines for better supporting this population to receive visual assistance. We analyzed 265 images (131 with questions; 134 without) of medication packages from a VizWiz dataset. We developed a 4-category coding scheme to analyze image quality, with two independent coders achieving excellent intercoder reliability (85%-95%). We found that 46% of the images were legible, 40% contained clear indicators for what information was sought, 40% had minimum background clutter (no more than a few items in image), and only a small amount (5% of total, 10% of images with questions) contained sufficient information to definitively answer the user questions. We also conducted an inductive thematic analysis to identify major challenges for humans (and potentially machine learning) to answer users’ questions. These findings suggest there is great potential for user-centered design research to enhance visual assistance tools like VizWiz for visually impaired users.



4:15pm - 4:30pm
ID: 217 / PS-05: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Mobile health, Health Informatics, User Empowerment, Value Co-creation

Patient Empowerment Through Mobile Health: Case Study with a Brazilian Application for Pregnancy Support

Gustavo Varela Delgado1, Rodrigo Baroni Carvalho1, Chun Wei Choo2, Ramon Silva Leite1, José Márcio Castro1

1Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Brazil; 2University of Toronto, Canada

This paper analyzes how mobile health applications contribute to the empowerment of health service users. The theoretical foundation includes m-health, user empowerment, and value co-creation. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to investigate the Kangaroo application (Canguru, in Portuguese), which targets Brazilian pregnant women and seeks to make women empowered for a healthy pregnancy. The free app is a healthcare social network designed by a health-tech startup and a reference Brazilian hospital. It has already supported 350,000 pregnant women, and more than 200 health professionals. The data collection effort comprised application log analysis of six months of records of 99,709 users, mobile-based survey with 429 women and 16 interviews. The results showed that the functionalities of the personal and social dimensions mapped in the application explain 85.5% of the user empowerment. The app social features impacted 2.4 more than the personal functionalities. The quantitative analysis concluded that there was no moderating effect of styles of value co-creation practices on the relationship between empowerment and its dimensions. The theoretical contribution is associated with the discussion of the influence of personal and social dimensions of m-health to the user empowerment.



4:30pm - 4:45pm
ID: 219 / PS-05: 3
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: family networks, informational support, social support, chronic illness

All in the Family: A Descriptive Analysis of Family Network Change in Families Managing Chronic Illness

Lindsay K. Brown1, Tiffany C. Veinot1,2

1University of Michigan, School of Information, USA; 2University of Michigan, School of Public Health, USA

Background: Social networks can be a source of support, including informational support, in chronic illness management, but can change over time in response to health crises. However, little is known about how families leverage their support networks to manage chronic illness over time — and how these networks may change.

Methods: For 28 families managing either diabetes or HIV, we gathered survey-based social network data, including network size, exchanges of support, and tie strength, up to 5 times over two years. We then used descriptive analysis to examine changes in network size, structure and function (e.g., informational support).

Findings: Although family networks remained stable in terms of network size and transitivity, these networks experienced regular fluctuations in both tie-level variables (i.e., tie strength) and density of informational support exchanges.

Discussion: Observed changes in these measures indicate that even family support networks are susceptible to change over time, particularly at the tie-level, indicating a need to expand the way we think of network change beyond whole network measures when looking at small, family networks, especially examining how information exchanges fluctuate over time. Future research should explore tie-level measures and support exchange networks to understand why networks change over time.



4:45pm - 5:00pm
ID: 268 / PS-05: 4
Long Papers
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Heath, Family, Health Information, Intergenerational, Healthy Living, Family Collaboration, Distance

Towards Family-Centered Health Technologies that Support Distributed Families on Sustainable Healthy Practices Together

Jomara Sandbulte1, Eun Kyoung Choe2, John M. Carroll1

1Pennsylvania State University, USA; 2University of Maryland, College Park, USA

Family relationships can be resources to foster individuals’ healthy behaviors. However, in many families, different factors can prevent members in supporting one another around positive health outcomes. A systematic understanding of these factors is crucial for developing appropriate solutions to reduce barriers on family collaboration in health promotion. In this paper, we focus on one factor that affects family support in healthy living: geographic distance. We present a formative study composed by two research explorations which aimed to examine distributed family members’ needs and challenges to engage in healthy living together. First, an interview study helped us understand families’ practices in engaging in health conversations. Then, findings from a scenario-based focus group discussion provided necessary knowledge to explore the use of technology to support conversations around health topics by distributed families. We draw on our findings to present practical recommendations for researchers working towards supporting intergenerational families on healthy practices collectively when living apart.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmToward an Integrated Information Science [SDGs 9, 17]
 
 
ID: 266 / [Single Presentation of ID 266]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Information Theory
Keywords: Information Science

Jenna Hartel1, Marcia Bates2, Tim Gorichanaz3, Christopher Lueg4, Kiersten Latham5, Soo Young Rieh6

1University of Toronto, Canada; 2University of California, Los Angeles, USA; 3Drexel University, USA; 4Bern University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland; 5Michigan State University, USA; 6University of Texas at Austin, USA

More than ever, Information Science needs a coherent, powerful, integrated vision of itself and the value proposition it delivers in this Information Age. Complex and multifaceted uncertainties like pandemics and climate change do not yield to narrow or piecemeal solutions. Holistic visions of Information Science existed at our field’s formation a century ago, but sadly over the years have become increasingly fragmented and specialized. This 90-minute panel invites participants in the ASIS&T 2020 Annual Meeting to reconsider the benefits of holism and creates a stage to re-imagine a big and integrated Information Science. To that end, we will first adopt Bates’ (2002) conception of seven interpenetrating “Layers of Understanding.” Then, information scientists with expertise in one of the seven layers will speak about the information phenomena at their level. Having the full range of strata illuminated, Dr. Bates will share her sage reflections. Ample time will remain for the audience to tinker with, extend, challenge, or celebrate the idea of a wide-ranging, integrated Information Science.

 
6:00pm - 7:00pmPresident's Opening Program and Welcome Reception: Information, Immunization, and Infodemic During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Via Zoom: https://zoom.us/join
Meeting ID: 859 7694 5203
Passcode: am2020pr

 
7:00pm - 8:00pmSIG-RUSH
 
Date: Monday, 26/Oct/2020
7:30am - 8:30amCoffee, Tea and Cocktails Social Hour

Zoom Meeting ID: 926 321 2704 
Passcode: asistam20 

 
9:00am - 9:40amAmplifying Chance for Positive Action and Serendipity by Design [SDG 9]
 
 
ID: 129 / [Single Presentation of ID 129]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
40 minutes
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Serendipity, humanities collections, digital libraries, digital archives, information behavior

Sarah A. Buchanan1, Sabrina Sauer2, Anabel Quan-Haase3, Naresh Kumar Agarwal4, Sanda Erdelez4

1University of Missouri, USA; 2University of Groningen, Netherlands; 3Western University, Canada; 4Simmons University, USA

In recent years, there has been an increased focus on information encountering and serendipity within information behavior research and practice. Serendipity has the potential to facilitate creativity and innovation in various spheres, including in libraries, archives and museums. However, do we wait for chance to occur, or can serendipity be designed and facilitated? What are the characteristics of systems that support serendipitous discovery, and what methods can be used to study its occurrence? Extending and building on the concepts and definitions introduced at a 2016 ASIS&T Annual Meeting panel (Erdelez et al., 2016), we feature in this 40-minute panel innovative work that creates opportunities for discovery within research spaces. Attendees engage through an interactive two-part discussion and a hands-on ideation session on impacts and guidelines for systems designed to facilitate serendipity, emphasizing sustainable, accessible researcher and user experiences. Presenters focus on the role of socio-technical constraints and affordances to inform systems’ design in a variety of research contexts, each contributing expertise in navigating particular issues in serendipity research.

 
9:00am - 10:30amAlternative Event: Transforming and Sustaining Information Science Education: A Conversation to Begin the asistED Podcast (SIG-ED) [SDG 4]
 
 
ID: 275 / [Single Presentation of ID 275]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Education in information sciences, podcasting, continuing education, e-learning, pandemic pedagogy

Danielle Pollock1, Andrew Demasson2, Mei Zhang3, Rachel Williams1, Arthur Maurici4,5

1Simmons University, USA; 2Queensland University of Technology, Australia; 3Syracuse University, USA; 4Nazareth College, USA; 5University of Maryland, USA

The COVID-19 global pandemic necessitated sudden, large scale transformations in higher education, as many institutions and programs were forced to leverage their existing technological resources and expertise to manage a rapid shift to delivering education in an online-only environment. In the short term, the shift required creativity, quick thinking, and in many cases, adaptations that were less than ideal. In wake of that semester, the conversation has now shifted to how to best manage sustained transformation of higher education in the face of these new realities. This, too, will take creativity and leveraging of technology and expertise. This alternative event represents an interactive conversation with information science education professionals about transformation experiences, the leveraging of new technologies, and the future of information science education. This event will also be the first episode of SIG ED’s new podcast, asistED: The Information Science Education Podcast, itself developed as a creative new way to offer a forum for conversation, connection, and continuing professional development focused on issues related to information science education. This event will be recorded for later download.

 
9:00am - 10:30amBut You Should See Color: Teaching and Research in Information Science [SDGs 4, 10, 16]
 
 
ID: 454 / [Single Presentation of ID 454]: 1
Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Accelerator Series
Topics: Research Methods
Keywords: research, race

Nicole A. Cooke1, Monica Colon-Aguirre2, Lisa Hussey3

1University of South Carolina, USA; 2East Carolina University, USA; 3Simmons University, USA

The phrase “but I don’t see color,” and the colorblind mindset it represents are a hindrance when trying to achieve sustainable and long-lasting progress in the diversification library and information science (LIS). This can be particularly evident for faculty who teach classes related to equity, diversity, inclusion, and social justice. It is not uncommon to have students (aspiring LIS information professionals) actively refuse to acknowledge race and resist participation in conversations on hard topics. Race remains disappointing invisible in LIS (Honma, 2005). This session features LIS faculty who have experience teaching difficult topics and trying to change the hearts and minds of colorblind students. Honma, T. (2005). Trippin’ over the color line: The invisibility of race in library and information studies. InterActions: UCLA Journal of Education and Information Studies, 1(2).

 
9:00am - 10:30amPaper Session 06: Personal Information Systems and Recommender Systems [SDGs 1-17]
Session Chair: Sanda Erdelez, Simmons University, United States of America
 
 
9:00am - 9:15am
ID: 193 / PS-06: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Intelligent Personal Assistants, Conversational Agents, Humor, Amazon Mechanical Turk

Assessing User Reactions to Intelligent Personal Assistants’ Humorous Responses

Irene Lopatovska, Elena Korshakova, Tracy Kubert

Pratt Institute, USA

The paper reports on the study that developed a classification of humorous interactions with intelligent personal assistants (IPAs) and applied the classification to compare four IPAs, Apple Siri, Google Assistant, Amazon Alexa and Microsoft Cortana, on their humor performance. The study relied on volunteer participants recruited through traditional academic channels (e.g. mailing lists) as well as Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT). While AMT and non-AMT participants differed on some demographic characteristics, their overall ratings of IPA humor were not significantly different and were analyzed jointly using descriptive and inferential statistics. The results revealed that Apple Siri and Google Assistant received higher average ratings on humorous IPA responses compared to Amazon Alexa and Microsoft Cortana. IPA responses to joke requests were judged as being funnier than IPA responses to questions related to the IPA’s personality, rhetorical statements and other humor types. Consistent with previous studies on humor, our findings did not demonstrate strong relationships between select user demographics (age, gender and humor style) and their ratings of humorous IPA responses.



9:15am - 9:30am
ID: 203 / PS-06: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Exploratory Search, Recommendation, Knowledge Graph, User Profile

Grapevine: A Profile-Based Exploratory Search and Recommendation System for Finding Research Advisors

Behnam Rahdari1, Peter Brusilovsky1, Dmitriy Babichenko1, Eliza Beth Littleton2, Ravi Patel3, Jaime Fawcett1, Zara Blum1

1School of Computing and Information, University of Pittsburgh, USA; 2Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, USAted States of America; 3School of Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh, USA

Finding research advisors is an important and challenging task for college students. On one hand, a research advisor that matches student interests and past preparation could fully engage the student with an exciting and productive research experience. On the other hand, students are frequently unable to formulate their interests and experience in a way that allows them to independently find the most compatible advisors using search and browsing tools. This paper reports our experience with designing and evaluating the Grapevine, an exploratory search and recommender system aimed at helping students, especially those less prepared and underrepresented in certain fields, find research advisors.



9:30am - 9:40am
ID: 192 / PS-06: 3
Short Papers
Topics: Research Methods
Keywords: Amazon Mechanical Turk, AMT, Crowdsourcing, Data Collection, Participants Recruiting, Research Methods, Questionnaires

Mechanical Turk or Volunteer Participant? Comparing the Two Samples in the Study of Intelligent Personal Assistants

Irene Lopatovska, Elena Korshakova

Pratt Institute, USA

A challenge in academic and practitioner research is recruiting study participants that match target demographics, possess a desired skillset, and will participate for little to no compensation. An alternative to traditional participant recruitment struggles is crowdsourcing participants through online labor markets, such as Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT). AMT is a platform that provides the tool for finding and recruiting participants with diverse demographics, skills, and experiences. This paper aims to demystify the use of crowdsourcing, and particularly AMT, by comparing the performance of traditionally recruited volunteers and AMT participants on tasks related to the evaluation of intelligent personal assistants (IPAs such as Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant, Apple Siri, and Microsoft Cortana). The comparison of AMT and non-AMT samples indicated that while the two samples differed on demographics, their task performance was not significantly different. The paper discusses the costs and benefits of using AMT samples and would be of particular relevance to researchers who employ questionnaires and/or task-specific data collection methods in their work.



9:40am - 9:50am
ID: 278 / PS-06: 4
Short Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Video games, Metadata, Qualitative Analysis, Text Mining, Plot/Narrative

Human Versus Machine: Analyzing Video Game User Reviews for Plot and Narrative

Hyerim Cho1, Jenny S. Bossaller1, Denice Adkins1, Jin Ha Lee2

1University of Missouri, USA; 2University of Washington, USA

Video game users have shown strong interests in having subject metadata to find games. However, creating and maintaining subject metadata is costly and difficult. This study explores the utility of an automated approach for generating subject metadata for video games, focusing on plot and narrative. By comparing two methods to analyze the reviews—qualitative analysis conducted by a human researcher vs. automated text analysis using topic modeling—the researchers investigate if an automated method can generate subject terms that are comparable to the ones generated by qualitative analysis. Findings suggest that even with a smaller set of sample dataset, qualitative analysis could create a better set of terms than automated text analysis. However, terms generated from the automated text analysis indicate that its capability to retrieve themes of the video game may be useful in future libraries.



9:50am - 10:00am
ID: 340 / PS-06: 5
Short Papers
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Funding, Grant Recommendation System, Learning to Rank, Information Retrieval

GotFunding: A Grant Recommendation System Based on Scientific Articles

Tong Zeng1,2, Daniel Acuna2

1Nanjing University, People's Republic of China; 2Syracuse University, USA

Obtaining funding is an important part of becoming a successful scientist. Junior faculty spend a great deal of time finding the right agencies and programs that best match their research profile. But what are the factors that influence the best publication–grant matching? Some universities might employ pre-award personnel to understand these factors, but not all institutions can afford to hire them. Historical records of publications funded by grants can help us understand the matching process and also help us develop recommendation systems to automate it. In this work, we present GotFunding (Grant recOmmendaTion based on past FUNDING), a recommendation system trained on National Institutes of Health's (NIH) grant–publication records. Our system achieves a high performance (NDCG@1 = 0.945) by casting the problem as learning to rank. By analyzing the features that make predictions effective, our results show that the ranking considers most important 1) the temporal proximity of the publication to the grant, 2) the amount of information provided in the publication (e.g., document length), and 3) the relevance of the publication to the grant. We discuss future improvements of the system and an online tool for scientists to try.

 
9:00am - 10:30amPaper Session 07: Student Award Session [SDGs 3, 4, 10, 12, 16]
Session Chair: Louise Spiteri, Dalhousie University School of Information Management, Canada
 
 
9:00am - 9:15am
ID: 491 / PS-07: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: digital technologies

Caring for Information Practices: An Inquiry into Visions of Data, Digital Technologies, and Migration

Saguna Shankar

University of British Columbia, Canada

Immigration is a process of re-making life elsewhere. In a time of growing digital management of human mobility across borders, this process extends beyond the circulation of people, knowledge, and material belongings. Migrating generates digital traces and data trails. Yet, to whom does immigration data belong? In what ways are information practices connected to immigration changing? How should newcomers’ data be cared for? In this session, I discuss my work investigating how the use of data and digital tools shapes information practices and processes of settling in Canada.

As immigration accelerates and humanitarian issues become more urgent, effective and ethical coordination amongst many actors is essential. This dissertation research is therefore informed by the plurality of interests and priorities between groups who support, manage, and study migration. I move between key groups by employing an ethnographic, participatory approach to learn from their information practices and values. Through this inquiry, I join ongoing practical and theoretical discussions by working with research partners to strengthen our web of relations with greater capacity for care, reflection, and responsibility in our use of information tools, particularly for those in vulnerable positions as they strive to survive in a disrupted world.



9:15am - 9:30am
ID: 492 / PS-07: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: serious gaming, gamification, interactive learning environment, sexual health literacy, digitally-savvy adolescents, sub-Saharan Africa.

Improving Sexual Health Education for Adolescent Students Using Game-Based Learning and Gamification [SDGs 3, 4, 10]

Hussein Haruna

University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

This study investigated the effectiveness of deploying innovative serious gaming and gamification pedagogies in promoting sexual health education among native students in Sub-Saharan Africa. In three iterations, a design-based research and participatory research design involving active game users (students) and other key stakeholders involved to develop and revise the digital serious games and gamification for sexual health education. A quasi-experimental research design was conducted using two experimental groups serious game and gamification)—with an existing traditional teaching method serving as a control group. In all, 348 students aged 11-15 were recruited from three secondary schools based in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, to participate in a series of five sexual health education topics. A multi-iteration mixed method was then used to assess and analyse the results for the students from the data collected using three techniques: pre-test and post-test, self-rating survey, and interviews. The results demonstrated students under experimental groups of serious games and gamification achieved significantly more improvements in their sexual health information scores than those under the traditional groups. Moreover, feedback from experimental conditions indicates that the serious gaming and gamification groups significantly improved the students’ motivation.

 
9:00am - 10:30amunCommons: Where are we Going? Information Science Research in Europe: Planning for 2030

Zoom Meeting ID: 862 5281 1647
Passcode: 196758

 
10:30am - 11:30amunCommons: SIG-InfoLearn Business Meeting & Evidence-Based and Pragmatic Online Teaching and Learning Approaches (A Response to Emergency Transitions to Remote Online Education in K-12 and Higher Education)

Zoom Meeting ID: 862 5858 5891
Passcode: 171822

 
11:00am - 12:30pmConceptualising and Studying Information Creation: From Production and Processes to Makers and Making [SDGs 9, 12]
 
 
ID: 128 / [Single Presentation of ID 128]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: information creation, records creation, documents, concepts

Isto Huvila1, Jennifer Douglas2, Tim Gorichanaz3, Kyungwon Koh4, Anna Suorsa5

1Uppsala University, Sweden and University of British Columbia, Canada; 2University of British Columbia, Canada; 3Drexel University, USA; 4University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA; 5University of Oulu, Finland

An emerging body of literature has begun to address the earlier under-researched topic of information creation. This panel inquires into the state-of-the-art of research on information creation to highlight how different conceptualisations of information creation can foreground various key aspects of how information is made and produced, what types of actors and activities are involved, how information creation can be studied empirically, and what novel insights can be drawn to support practitioners, for instance, in information literacy instruction, information organisation and management, and information systems and services development.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmPaper Session 08: Data Management [SDGs 1-17]
Session Chair: Rong Tang, Simmons College, United States of America
 
 
11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 124 / PS-08: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Personas, web analytics, persona development; data-driven personas; design methods

From Flat File to Interface: Synthesis of Personas and Analytics for Enhanced User Understanding

Bernard "Jim" Jansen, Joni O. Salminen, Soon-gyo Jung

Qatar Computing Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Doha, Qatar

to analytics data, personas are more and more generated from online user statistics using big data and algorithmic approaches. This integration offers new opportunities to shift personas from flat files of data presentation to that of interactive interfaces for analytics systems. We illustrate this transition towards the concept of ‘persona as interface’ with a persona analytics system, Automatic Persona Generation (APG). In pushing advancements of both persona and analytics conceptualization, development, and use, the APG system presents a multi-layered ‘full-stack’ integration. APG affords three levels of user data presentation, which are (a) the conceptual persona, (b) the analytical user metrics, and (c) the foundational user data. Moving to a ‘personas as interfaces’ approach offers the benefits of both personas and analytics systems and addresses some of the shortcomings of each. We provide results from user experiments of and use cases for APG. The result is a better tool than either persona or analytics along for user understanding.



11:15am - 11:25am
ID: 126 / PS-08: 2
Short Papers
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Community Question-Answering, Framing Theory, Response Network, Information Sharing, Social Net-work Analysis

Generating Collective Online Information Sharing: The Framing Effect of Questions on Response Networks

Qian Wu, Dion Hoe-Lian Goh, Chei Sian Lee

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Community Question-Answering (CQA) sites are virtual communities where users participate in collec-tive online information sharing. Questions in CQA sites serve as starting points for information sharing, eliciting a response network (RN), where nodes are the postings, while edges represent the responses be-tween postings. This research employed framing theory to investigate how question frames affected their resulting RNs. Question frames were operationalized as conversational and informational. Social network analysis was conducted to explore the RNs of different question frames for both Science, Technology, En-gineering and Mathematics (STEM) and non-STEM communities. Results revealed that most RNs of STEM conversational questions were larger in size and had higher centrality, whereas RNs of informational ques-tions comprised closer relationships between postings. However, no significant differences were found in the non-STEM community. Our research suggests that community moderators and askers should appropri-ately utilize question frames to organize information sharing inside CQA communities.



11:25am - 11:35am
ID: 146 / PS-08: 3
Short Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Linked Data, Name authorities, Title authorities, Data modelling

A Person-Agent and Related Information Resources: A Case Study of Complex Relationships

Hur-Li Lee, Margaret Kipp, Li Yang

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA

Identifying and mapping relationships is of increasing importance as many cultural heritage institutions work to model data in Linked Data (LD) format. As a pilot of a larger LD project, this study examines relationships between information resources, between person-agents and resources, and between person-agents, in order to improve description and access to information related to persons and resources. We used a case-study approach to identify new and previously-defined relationships in bibliographic records associated with a person-agent. To find a case that exhibits complex relationships, we selected Lin Huiyin (林徽因), a famous Chinese architect, architectural historian, poet, artist, designer, and writer in the 20th century. We collected 903 records using WorldCat and China Academic Library & Information System. We applied a coding scheme consisting of relationship categories from several existing taxonomies. In the analysis, additional relationships emerged, which were then added to the coding scheme. Our next step is to broaden the scope of the case by examining other types of resources outside libraries such as Lin’s architectural works. Further studies of complex cases will allow us to refine our taxonomy and develop an LD model for relationships between resources and person-agents.



11:35am - 11:45am
ID: 222 / PS-08: 4
Short Papers
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Research Data, Academic Library, Research Data Management, Research Data Service

Academic Library’s Leadership and Stakeholder Involvement in Research Data Services

Jeonghyun Kim

University of North Texas, USA

In the last decade, academic libraries have made progress in establishing themselves as hubs and leaders for research data services on campus. The importance of collaborating with a range of institutional stakeholders, such as the research or information technology office, as well as external partners in developing and delivering research data policy, services, and infrastructure, has been well-documented. However, there is less evidence as to how libraries play a crucial role in leadership, whether other stakeholders’ involvement actually makes a difference and if so, how they make a difference. As such, the goal of this study is to explore the academic library’s leadership role in research data services and how collaboration and partnership with stakeholders and interested parties might impact the maturity of the research data services the library provides. The secondary analysis of the existing survey data found that libraries offer more mature services when they take a primary responsibility in developing the services. It also found internal stakeholders’ and external partners’ involvement leads to more mature services in the selected activities.



11:45am - 11:55am
ID: 257 / PS-08: 5
Short Papers
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: data management plans, evaluation, metadata

Data Management Plan Scorecard

Bradley W. Bishop1, Heather Moulaison2, Judit Ungvari3,4, Hannah C. Gunderman5

1University of Tennessee, USA; 2University of Missouri, USA; 3Belmont Forum, Uraguay; 4Florida Museum of Natural History, USA; 5Carnegie Mellon University, USA

Data and how that data are organized, accessed, and used, remain central to the advancement of science, as evidenced through calls for reproducibility and demands to enable re-use. Data management plans describe the roles, responsibilities, and activities for managing data during and after research. This paper presents the development of a data management plan scorecard. The assessment of data management plans provides one measure to evaluate how data are planned to be shared and a first step down the road towards shareable data. The scorecard provides a widely-applicable, scalable, and simple tool to assess completeness and quality of fifteen data elements commonly required in all data management plans.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmPaper Session 09: Health and Technology [SDG 3]
Session Chair: Dania Bilal, University of Tennessee, United States of America
 
 
11:00am - 11:10am
ID: 163 / PS-09: 1
Short Papers
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: systematic reviews, health controversies, public health, evidence synthesis, network visualization

Visualizing Evidence-Based Disagreement Over Time: The Landscape of a Public Health Controversy 2002-2014

Tzu-Kun {Esther} Hsiao, Yuanxi Fu, Jodi Schneider

UIUC, USA

Systematic reviews answer specific questions based on primary literature. However, systematic reviews on the same topic frequently disagree, yet there are no approaches for understanding why at a glance. Our goal is to provide a visual summary that could be useful to researchers, policy makers, and health care professionals in understanding why health controversies persist in the expert literature over time. We present a case study of a single controversy in public health, around the question: “Is reducing dietary salt beneficial at a population level?” We define and visualize three new constructs: the overall evidence base, which consists of the evidence summarized by systematic reviews (the inclusion network) and the unused evidence (isolated nodes). Our network visualization shows at a glance what evidence has been synthesized by each systematic review. Visualizing the temporal evolution of the network captures two key moments when new scientific opinions emerged, both associated with a turn to new sets of evidence that had little to no overlap with previously reviewed evidence. Limited overlap between the evidence reviewed was also found for systematic reviews published in the same year. Future work will focus on understanding the reasons for limited overlap and automating this methodology for medical literature databases.



11:10am - 11:20am
ID: 216 / PS-09: 2
Short Papers
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Diet, Social Media, Twitter, Text Mining, Topic Modeling

Seasonal Characterization of Diet Discussions on Reddit

Victoria Money1, Amir Karami1, Brie Turner-McGrievy1, Hadi Kharrazi2

1University of South Carolina, USA; 2Johns Hopkins University, USA

To monitor public opinions on diet, large survey data is commonly used though costly and time consuming. Social media has become a mainstream channel of communication and has drastically grown in popularity, connecting users to a ready stream of health information. While the literature has provided valuable information on the use of social media for health, a broader perspective informed by different types of social media platforms would be highly beneficial. Diet has been extensively explored on a few mainstream platforms, further informing public health research. However, diet conversations on Reddit have only been studied within a narrow scope, looking at specific sub-communities. This study aims to characterize diet-related posts and their seasonal patterns using a mixed method approach. We collected more than 500,000 posts with subsequent comments from Reddit over the course of a year. Our findings show that Reddit users across all sub-communities primarily discussed health promotion, fitness plans, a healthy lifestyle, diet and fitness progress, food experiences, weight loss, as well as vegan and vegetarian diets. In addition, seasonal differences based on the weight of most topics, were found to be significant (p < 0.05).



11:20am - 11:30am
ID: 276 / PS-09: 3
Short Papers
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Acceptability, artificial intelligence, trust, diagnostic results, healthcare.

Lay Individuals’ Perceptions of Artificial Intelligence (AI)-Empowered Healthcare Systems

Zhan Zhang1, Yegin Genc1, Aiwen Xing2, Dakuo Wang3, Xiangmin Fan4, Daniel Citardi1

1Pace University, USA; 2Florida State University, USA; 3IBM Research, USA; 4Chinese Academy of Sciences, China

With the recent advances in Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology, more and more patient-facing applications have started embodying this novel technology to deliver timely healthcare information and services to the patient. However, little is known about lay individuals’ perceptions and acceptance of AI-driven, patient-facing health systems. In this study, we conducted a survey with 203 participants to investigate their perceptions about using AI to consult information related to their diagnostic results and what factors influence their perceptions. Our results showed that despite the awareness and experience of patient-facing AI systems being low amongst our participants, people had a generally positive attitude towards such systems. Several intrinsic factors, such as education background and technology literacy, play an important role in people’s perceptions of using AI to comprehend diagnostic results. We conclude this paper by discussing the implications of this work, with an emphasis on enhancing the trustworthiness of AI and bridging the digital divide.



11:30am - 11:40am
ID: 306 / PS-09: 4
Short Papers
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: healthy diet recommendation, graph mining, data integration

Healthy Diet Recommendation via Food-Nutrition-Recipe Graph Mining

Kequan Li1, Zhuoren Jiang2, Haijiao Wang3, Xiaozhong Liu4

1Dalian Maritime University, People's Republic of China; 2Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China; 3Alibaba Group, People's Republic of China; 4Indiana University Bloomington, USA

Good nutrition and balance dietary pattern play vital roles of leading a healthy lifestyle. Prior studies showed that the healthy diet can successfully reduce the risk of chronic diseases (e.g., type 2 diabetes and cancer) and bring other well-documented benefits. Existing food recommendation models, however, often solely rely on user's feedback (e.g., click and purchase data), which aims to optimize Click-Through Rate (CTR) but ignores the importance of health needs of users. Intuitively, a healthy diet recommendation requires a comprehensive consideration of different kinds of information, such as nutrition, ingredients and cooking methods. In this study, by collecting the data from FoodData Central (FDC), recipe websites, and scientific literature, we construct a heterogeneous graph, Food-Nutrition-Recipe Graph (FNRG), by integrating information of nutrition, food (ingredients), and recipes. A random walk based graph mining approach is proposed to meet the health needs of users. Experiments results show that the proposed method can successfully address the health information needs for people who suffer from chronic diabetes.



11:40am - 11:50am
ID: 351 / PS-09: 5
Short Papers
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: eHealth Literacy, Information Source, Reading Behavior, Eye-tracking, Online Health Information Seeking

EHealth Literacy, Information Sources, and Health Webpage Reading Patterns

Yung-Sheng Chang, Jacek Gwizdka, Yan Zhang

The University of Texas at Austin, United States of America

A lab-based experiment was conducted to understand how eHealth literacy and information source affect reading vs. scanning behavior on health webpages. Participants read 15 webpages from commercial, government, and online forum sources while their eye movements were tracked. Negative binomial regression and Kruskal-Wallis tests revealed that high eHealth literacy participants tend to scan webpages, while low literacy participants tend to read webpages. There were no differences in the tendencies to scan or read among different information sources. Our work shows that observable objective information behavior is attributable to eHealth literacy and may provide additional insights to the measurement of eHealth literacy.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmStanding Out in the Academic LIS Job Market: An Interactive Panel not Just for Doctoral Students [SDG 4, 8]
 
 
ID: 173 / [Single Presentation of ID 173]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Doctoral students, faculty, academic jobs, academe

Naresh Kumar Agarwal1, Kyong-Eun Oh1, Rachel Williams1, Darin S. Freeburg2, Howard Rosenbaum3, Barbara Kwasnik4

1Simmons University, USA; 2University of South Carolina, USA; 3Indiana University Bloomington, USA; 4Syracuse University, USA

This proposal builds on the previous successes of the interactive panels sponsored by the ASIS&T Special Interest Group on Education (SIG ED) at the 2017, 2015, 2013, 2012, and 2011 annual meetings. The all-new 2020 panel features faculty in various stages of their academic careers, including a relatively new assistant professor, one who has just completed the tenure process, two associate professors, a full professor, and a professor emerita. The panelists are prepared to address audience questions on topics such as the traditional academic job market, alternative career paths including post-doctoral opportunities, development of personal research agendas, challenges of online instruction (Sithole et al., 2019), as well as the challenges and disruption caused in higher education due to the COVID-19 situation (Amour, 2020). The panel discussion will focus around the academic job market and how applicants can present themselves in the best light depending upon the type of position sought. Doctoral students will gain valuable insights on finishing their dissertation, weighing postdoctoral opportunities, and preparing for their first academic position. The panel will be useful not only to doctoral students but also to postdocs, adjuncts, and assistant-to-associate-to-full professors, as the panelists share their insights and experience through various career stages.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmSIG Cabinet Meeting

Zoom Meeting ID: 926 321 2704 
Passcode: asistam20 

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmASIST Heritage and Information History (SIG-HFIS) [SDGs 12, 16]
 
 
ID: 271 / [Single Presentation of ID 271]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Research Methods
Keywords: Information, History, Preservation, Research, ASIST

Kathryn La Barre1, Colin B. Burke2, Michael K. Buckland3, Tim Gorichanaz4

1University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA; 2University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA; 3University of California, Berkeley, USA; 4Drexel University, USA

A progress report and discussion on the preservation of, and access to, historical resources relating to the history of ASIST and of Information Science and Technology generally and guidance for members interested on opportunities and methods.

Kathryn La Barre, ASIST Curator, will describe the origin of her role as ASIST Curator, responsibilities and achievements of this position, and will assess the state of Information Science in relation to the conference theme of information for a sustainable world.

Two views from the field: Two experienced writers on information history will describe their experience undertaking information history and offer advice on priorities for the preservation of resources, how to undertake historical work, and best practices in using historical resources.

Colin B. Burke, emeritus professor of history, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, has published numerous books on the history of information, computing, intelligence, and higher education. He received the 2018 ASIST Best Book Award and has exceptional experience using FOIA requests and archival resources.

Michael K. Buckland, emeritus professor, Berkeley, has worked on studies of European and US pioneers of documentation and information science, and, currently, 101 years of women in Berkeley’s School of Information.

Q&A and contributions from audience.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmIntegrating Research and Teaching for Data Curation in iSchools [SDG 4]
 
 
ID: 277 / [Single Presentation of ID 277]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Data education, data curation, data science, curriculum development, pedagogy

Amelia Acker1, Devan Ray Donaldson2, Adam Kriesberg3, Andrea K. Thomer4, Nicholas Weber5

1University of Texas at Austin, USA; 2Indiana University Bloomington, USA; 3Simmons University, USA; 4University of Michigan, USA; 5University of Washington, USA

The quickly changing nature of information science and technology creates unique and remarkable challenges in terms of developing curriculum focused on building data competencies. Faculties responsible for teaching current developments in information studies have the unique burden of needing to continuously update our curricula without sacrificing our broader teaching goals. This panel features diverse perspectives on teaching data curation skills in five US-based schools of information at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Panelists will present their unique perspectives on pedagogical approaches in courses dedicated to data curation, digital preservation, description and access standards, as well as data access and interchange. Topics introduced will range from flipped classroom techniques, finding messy datasets, common pitfalls, hands-on labs, cloud based tools, data carpentry labs, and sequencing learning objectives to match stages of the data life cycle. This panel will give ASIST conference participants an opportunity to see a range of junior faculty, each with IMLS funded research projects related to data curation, share their experiences of teaching data competencies in the classroom.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmPaper Session 10: Information Organization [SDGs 4, 9, 11, 12]
Session Chair: Ann Graf, Simmons University, United States of America
 
 
4:00pm - 4:15pm
ID: 107 / PS-10: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Diffusion of innovations, libraries, linked data, innovation adoption

Diffusion and Adoption of Linked Data Among Libraries

Jinfang Niu

University of South Florida, USA

Through content analyses of literature about the Linked Data adoption of individual libraries, this study found that the diffusion of Linked Data among libraries is a decentralized process with high-degree of reinvention and a continuous process that includes multiple stages and might last for many years. The diffusion of Linked Data among libraries involves the diffusion of numerous related innovations, follows three paths (inter-library, intra-library, and inter-librarian), and is facilitated by four types of institutions (professional associations, vendors, external funders, and leading libraries) and three factors (avoiding re-inventing the wheel, standardization, and commercialization).



4:15pm - 4:30pm
ID: 302 / PS-10: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Social tagging, user interfaces, text entry, folksonomies, classification

The Effects of Suggested Tags and Autocomplete Features on Social Tagging Behaviors

Chris Holstrom

University of Washington, USA

Many websites employ social tagging to allow users to label and classify information. These tagging user interfaces use a variety of features to support efficient and consistent tag creation, including suggested tags and autocomplete for tags. This study uses a custom-built tagging interface in a controlled experiment to determine how these features affect social tagging behavior. The study finds that suggested tags do not have a significant effect on the number of tags, number of unique tags, number of typos, or time elapsed per tagged provided. However, autocomplete significantly increases the number and consistency of tags provided, significantly decreases the rate of typos, and significantly decreases the elapsed time per tag provided. These findings for the autocomplete feature align with the priorities and constraints of social tagging folksonomies that support retrieval and site navigation and suggest that autocomplete is an important aid for text entry in social tagging user interfaces.



4:30pm - 4:40pm
ID: 240 / PS-10: 3
Short Papers
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Content analysis, Annotation quality, Text classification.

Using Text Classification to Improve Annotation Quality by Improving Annotator Consistency

Emi Ishita1, Satoshi Fukuda1, Yoichi Tomiura1, Douglas W. Oard2

1Kyushu University, Japan; 2University of Maryland, College Park, USA

This paper presents results of experiments in which annotators were asked to selectively reexamine their decisions when those decisions seemed inconsistent. The annotation task was binary topic classification. To operationalize the concept of annotation consistency, a text classifier was trained on all manual annotations made during a complete first pass and then used to automatically recode every document. Annotators were then asked to perform a second manual pass, limiting their attention to cases in which their first annotation disagreed with the text classifier. On average across three annotators, each working independently, 11% of first pass annotations were reconsidered, 46% of reconsidered annotations were changed in the second pass, and 71% of changed annotations agreed with decisions made independently by an experienced fourth annotator. The net result was that for an 11% average increase in annotation cost it was possible to increase overall chance corrected agreement with the annotation decisions of an experienced annotator (as measured by kappa) from 0.69 to 0.73.



4:40pm - 4:50pm
ID: 269 / PS-10: 4
Short Papers
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: language archive metadata, free-text metadata, comparative analysis, metadata quality

Descriptive Richness of Free-Text Metadata: A Comparative Analysis of Three-Language Archives

Mary Burke, Oksana L. Zavalina

University of North Texas, USA

As archiving became a priority in documentary linguistics only in the 1990’s, existing research indicates that language archives are not yet up to date on best practices in information organization. As a result, metadata in language archives varies substantially, depending on the depositor, self-upload procedures, and metadata creation guidelines. Focusing on free-text metadata, known to provide rich information, this study analyzes item-level metadata in three language archives: the Endangered Language Archive, Pacific Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures, and the Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America. The study identified the categories of information included in Description metadata fields and the relative distribution of these categories. The most commonly occurring categories of information observed in this study can serve as a basis for the development of best practice guidelines for item-level metadata in language archives.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmPaper Session 11: Education and Research [SDGs 4, 12]
Session Chair: Bebe Chang, Nova Southeastern University - Alvin Sherman Library, Research & Info Tech, United States of America
 
 
4:00pm - 4:15pm
ID: 162 / PS-11: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Privacy and Ethics
Keywords: peer review, editorial review, misconduct, plagiarism, censorship

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Scholarly Research Integrity

S. Koby Taswell1, Christopher Triggle2, June Vayo3, Shiladitya Dutta1, Carl Taswell1

1Brain Health Alliance, USA; 2Weill Cornell Medicine, Al Rayyan, Qatar; 3Huntington Library, USA

The pursuit of truth in research should be both an ideal in aspiration and also a reality in practice. The PORTAL-DOORS Project (PDP) strives to promote creative authenticity, fair citation, and adherence to integrity and ethics in scholarly research publishing using the FAIR family of quantitative metrics with acronym FAIR for the phrases Fair Attribution to Indexed Reports and Fair Acknowledgment of Information Records, and the DREAM principles with acronym DREAM for the phrase Discoverable Data with Reproducible Results for Equivalent Entities with Accessible Attributes and Manageable Metadata. This report presents formalized definitions for idea-laundering plagiarism by authors, idea-bleaching censorship by editors, and proposed assertion claims for authors, reviewers, editors, and publishers in ethical peer-reviewed publishing to support integrity in research. All of these principles have been implemented in version 2 of the PDP-DREAM ontology written in OWL 2. This PDP-DREAM ontology will serve as the model foundation for development of a software-guided workflow process intended to manage the ethical peer-reviewed publishing of web-enabled open access journals operated online with PDP software.



4:15pm - 4:30pm
ID: 214 / PS-11: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Literature Review, Active Reading, Scholarly Primitive, Sensemaking, Interdisciplinary Research

Opening Up the Black Box of Scholarly Synthesis: Intermediate Products, Processes, and Tools

Xin Qian, Katrina Fenlon, Wayne Lutters, Joel Chan

College of Information Studies, University of Maryland, USA

Synthesis is a foundational scholarly product that generates new conceptual wholes from independent intellectual sources. But effective synthesis products—such as literature reviews—are rare, in part due to inadequate support from existing tools and information systems. A detailed, situated understanding of the work practices behind synthesis is necessary to inform the development of synthesis tools. Previous work in scholarly primitives, active reading, and sensemaking provide partial explanations of aspects of synthesis, but a detailed explanation of scholarly synthesis, specifically, is lacking. This paper presents a foundational empirical examination of the work practices behind synthesis to address the gap, focusing on unpacking the intermediate products, processes, and tools through in-depth contextual interviews with scholars. Results shed light on the distinctive intermediate products generated during synthesis—including in-source annotations, per-source summaries, and cross-source syntheses—as well as effortful processes for nonlinear progression of these intermediate products towards a final synthesis product. These products and practices were also embedded in a complex ecology of creative re-appropriated tools. This work enriches understanding of the complex scholarly practices that produce synthesis and opens up a research agenda for understanding and supporting scholarly synthesis more generally.



4:30pm - 4:45pm
ID: 309 / PS-11: 3
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: authorship, author order, scientific writing, authorship rubrics, scholarly communication

Quantifying Authorship: A Comparison of Authorship Rubrics from Five Disciplines

Devon Whetstone, Heather Moulaison

University of Missouri, USA

Transparency in authorship is a continuing topic in information science and scholarly communication. The process of determining authorship order in multi-author publications, however, can be complicated. Authorship rubrics helping teams arrive at authorship order exist, but the extent to which certain roles are quantified (or not) and rewarded with authorship is unclear. This study examines eight authorship rubrics from five disciplines in the sciences and social sciences and evaluates their alignment with the Contributor Role Taxonomy (CRediT) framework; authorship rubrics are also compared on how they assign authorship credit and determine authorship order. Findings indicate that work on the methodology and the initial writing of the manuscript are most consistently quantified in authorship rubrics across the disciplines. Procedures for awarding authorship credit vary widely and methods for tie-breaking rubric scores range from systematic to arbitrary. These findings suggest that regardless of discipline, contributions to carrying out and writing up research are seen as criteria for authorship. Differences in procedures for ordering authors may result, however, in different author order based on the chosen rubric. Ultimately, the fitness of use for authorship rubrics should be carefully considered by members of research teams, especially if the teams are comprised of interdisciplinary members.



4:45pm - 5:00pm
ID: 315 / PS-11: 4
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Open peer review, Review comments, Citations, Rounds of review, Matching

Does Opening up Peer Review Benefit Science in Terms of Citations?

Jue Ni, Zhenyue Zhao, Yupo Shao, Shuo Liu, Wanlin Li, Jiang Li

Nanjing University, People's Republic of China

This paper studied whether opening up review reports benefits science in terms of citations, by taking Nature Communications as an example. To address these questions, we extracted 3,500 papers published in Nature Communications in 2016 and 4,326 papers in 2017, and retrieved their three-year citations since publication in the Web of Science database. By applying the Matching method, we constructed an observation group including 1,726 open peer review (OPR) papers and a control group including 1,726 non-OPR counterparts. The results of the paired sample t-test showed that there is no significant difference between the OPR and non-OPR papers. We conclude that opening up peer review reports did not benefit papers in Nature Communications in terms of citations. We further examined whether the length, the rounds or the lexical diversity of the review report contributed to the paper’s citations, through regression analysis, and found that longer comments, more rounds of review and the more diversified words did not contribute to the citations of the OPR papers in Nature Communications. Further research covering more OPR journals is required to justify the benefits of OPR.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmunCommons: SIG-ED: Educational Challenges and Covid-19: An Open Forum for Information Practitioners

Zoom Meeting ID: 846 6380 8172
Passcode: 594381

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmunCommons: SIG-HLTH: Challenges and Opportunities to Make Health Data Reusable

Zoom Meeting ID: 837 1846 7619
Passcode: 591358

 
Date: Tuesday, 27/Oct/2020
9:00am - 10:30amMy Favorite Unreliable Source? Information Sharing and Acquisition Through Informal Networks [SDGs 16, 17]
 
 
ID: 244 / [Single Presentation of ID 244]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Informal networks, information behavior, online networks, marginalized communities

Rebekah Willson1, George R. Buchanan2, Gary Burnett3, Nicole Ellison4, Sanda Erdelez5, Michael Twidale6

1McGill University, Canada; 2University of Melbourne, Australia; 3Florida State University, USA; 4University of Michigan, USA; 5Simmons College, USA; 6University of Illinois, USA

Informal information networks are the personal connections of friends, family and colleagues that people use to help them find information. Recently, a great deal of attention has been paid to social network sites, and other social media, as a key source of information and misinformation in contemporary society. This panel will probe deeper, to investigate the personal connections that underpin and lie behind the social connections visible on social network sites. We will debate what we actually know, and do not know, about how people find information through others, both on- and off-line.

 
9:00am - 10:30amPaper Session 12: Knowledge Management [SDGs 1-17]
Session Chair: Daniel G. Alemneh, University of North Texas, United States of America
 
 
9:00am - 9:15am
ID: 169 / PS-12: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: knowledge management, measurement, behavior analysis

Tacit Knowledge Transfer in Training and the Inherent Limitations of Using Quantitative Measures

Amy Rosellini, Suliman Hawamdeh

University of North Texas, USA

The greatest challenge for many organizations today is not the acquisition, organization and storage of information, but rather the ability to transform such information into useful knowledge as well as the application and measurement of it. This paper discusses effective knowledge transfer in a training environment and the inherent limitations in using only quantitative measures as a tool of knowledge transfer measurement. By examining the measurement tool of a major U.S.-based airline, this study identifies disparity in peer and observer behavior assessment to understand other important factors that impact the measurement of knowledge transfer.



9:15am - 9:30am
ID: 294 / PS-12: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Collaboration networks, metadata analytics, data authors, knowledge diffusion, scientometric measures

Data to Knowledge in Action: A Longitudinal Analysis of GenBank Metadata

Jeff Hemsley, Jian Qin, Sarah E. Bratt

Syracuse University, USA

Studies typically use publication-based authorship data to study the relationships between collaboration networks and knowledge diffusion. However, collaboration in research often starts long before publication with data production efforts. In this project we ask how does collaboration in data production networks affect and contribute to knowledge diffusion, as represented by patents, another form of knowledge diffusion. We drew our data from the meta-data associated with genetic sequence records stored in the National Institutes of Health's GenBank database. After constructing networks for each year and aggregating summary statistics, regressions were used to test a number of hypotheses. Key among our findings is that data production team size is positively related to the number of patents each year. Also, when actors on average have more links, we tend to see more patents. Our study makes a contribution in the area of science of science by highlighting the important role of data production in the diffusion of knowledge as measured by patents.



9:30am - 9:40am
ID: 281 / PS-12: 3
Short Papers
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: knowledge engineering, provenance, knowledge representation, systems analysis, geological informatics

Adapting Research Process Models for the Design of Knowledge Engineering Applications

Donald A. Keefer, Karen M. Wickett

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

To design knowledge bases that effectively address the desired reasoning goals, knowledge engineering requires a detailed description of information flow throughout the targeted reasoning processes. Most existing technologies for workflow modeling do not provide sufficient detail for projects where cognitive reasoning and field- or lab-based data collection are important components. Research Process Modeling (RPM) was developed to support curation and data lifecycle needs, providing user-targeted documentation on processes, agents, and artifacts within research projects that include both computational and field- or lab-based processes. We demonstrate the use of RPM to support the design of a knowledge engineering application within 3-D geologic mapping, by documenting and describing information flow through a complex research project involving field-, computation-, and cognitive process-generated data. The results demonstrate necessary modifications to the Research Processing Modeling approach, and the value that RPM provides for describing information flow to support the design of complex knowledge engineering applications.



9:40am - 9:50am
ID: 353 / PS-12: 4
Short Papers
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Structure research data; human data interaction; user behaviors

Task-Based Human-Structured Research Data Interaction: A Discipline Independent Examination

Fanghui Xiao, Rongqian Ma, Daqing He

University of Pittsburgh, USA

With the development of open data movement, an increasing number of structured research datasets (SRD) are available online due to the successful data infrastructure and the strong demand of sharing data. Yet it lacks a thorough, systematic investigation of researcher-SRD interaction, which is important to understand users’ needs, challenges, and expectations. Our work extends from the current scholarship and proposes a task-based approach to examining how researchers interact with SRD, without considering individual disciplines. This study identifies two types of research tasks, the data-driven tasks and model-driven tasks, and also proposes a framework for researcher-SRD interaction. Our findings will contribute to the research field of human data behaviors.

 
9:00am - 10:30amPaper Session 13: Diverse Populations [SDGs 3, 5, 10, 16]
Session Chair: Alison Hicks, University College, London (UCL), United Kingdom
 
 
9:00am - 9:15am
ID: 141 / PS-13: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Emotion recognition, Emotion analysis, Online debates

Emotions in Online Debates: Tales from 4Forums and ConvinceMe

Jinfen Li, Lu Xiao

Syracuse University, USA

It is increasingly common for people to debate over various topics through online debate forums. While it has been shown that participants’ emotional states affect debate processes and outcomes, it is unknown how different types of emotions are represented in online debates and what correlations exist between the emotions and other aspects of the debates such as their debate topic. We conduct a large-scale analysis of the emotions in two online debate forums, namely, 4Forums and ConvinceMe. Specifically, we first develop an emotion recognition algorithm that uses multiple channels BLSTM with a feedforward attention mechanism, which outperforms the state-of-the-art emotion recognition algorithm. Next, we label the emotions of each comment in the selected 4Forums and ConvinceMe discussions and analyze various aspects of the emotion’s influence in the online debates. We observe that certain types of emotions are more likely dependent on the debate topic, and the prevalence of different emotions is independent of the individual discussions. We also observe emotion contagion between a comment and the immediately previous comment. We investigate the emotions of different types of respondents are less likely to express joy when they disagree and more likely to express disgust when they attack or disrespect to others.



9:15am - 9:25am
ID: 130 / PS-13: 2
Short Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Information behavior, narrative technique, older migrants, transition process

Late-Life Immigration, Transition Process, and Information Behavior Among Older Chinese Individuals in Australia

Jia Tina Du1, Fang Xu2

1University of South Australia, Australia; 2Soochow University, China

The study reported in this paper is part of an ongoing project that aims to advance the understanding of older migrants’ information behavior in transition and their resilience in leveraging information and technology to achieve social integration into a new country. Through the lens of transition theory, this research investigates the information behavior of Chinese migrants to Australia at an older age (i.e. late-life migrants), which is little reported in the migrant information behavior literature. Older Chinese migrants’ transition process entailed disconnectedness from previous information practices, perceptions of marginalization and having limited access to resources in English, and construction of new/extended information landscape by participating in ethnic associations and using WeChat for communication.



9:25am - 9:35am
ID: 131 / PS-13: 3
Short Papers
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: cyberchondria, affective responses, intolerance of uncertainty, e-health literacy, online health information seeking

An Exploration of Determinants of Cyberchondria: A Moderated Mediation Analysis

Han Zheng1, Xiaoyu Chen1, Shaoxiong Fu2

1Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 2Wuhan University, People's Republic of China

Cyberchondria describes excessive or repeated health-related information seeking on the Internet that is associated with increased emotional distress. Research on cyberchondria is still nascent. This study aims to propose a moderated mediation model to examine the relationships among intolerance of uncertainty, affective responses, e-health literacy, and cyberchondria. Based on an online survey of 426 participants in China, the results suggest that intolerance of uncertainty is positively associated with cyberchondria, and affective responses partially mediate this association. Additionally, e-health literacy negatively moderates the effect of affective responses on cyberchondria. Implications and limitations of this study are discussed.



9:35am - 9:45am
ID: 261 / PS-13: 4
Short Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: information practices; lgbtq+ communities; health information; information worlds mapping; discursive power

“When Someone Sees Me, I Am Nothing of the Norm”: Examining the Discursive Role Power Plays in Shaping LGBTQ+ Health Information Practices

Vanessa L. Kitzie, Travis L. Wagner, A. Nick Vera

University of South Carolina, USA

This paper examines how discursive power shapes LGBTQ+ individual and community health information practices. Informed by analysis of 10 information worlds maps drawn by SC LGBTQ+ community leaders, our findings indicate that while community can be a valuable construct to reject mainstream discourses of regulation and correction, it inevitably is fraught and not representative of all LGBTQ+ individuals. Findings can inform strategies for community leaders to facilitate more equitable information flow among members by identifying key structural elements impeding this flow at the community level.



9:45am - 9:55am
ID: 263 / PS-13: 5
Short Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: public libraries, older adults, public health, exercise science, rural communities

Physical and Social Health at the Library: Studying Small and Rural Public Libraries as Venues for Group Fitness Among Older Adults

Noah Lenstra, Fatih Oguz

University of North Carolina at Greensboro, USA

Public libraries increasingly offer opportunities to engage in health promotion activities inaccessible elsewhere in the community. Strategies to support physical activity for older adults can be implemented in a variety of different settings, including public libraries. Nonetheless, despite increasing recognition of this role, this trend has received limited scholarly attention. This study reports on a proof of concept study that took place across 12 weeks in 49 small and rural public libraries across the US. During that time, 535 older adults participated in a video-based exercise program at the library. Participants reported increased levels of physical activity and increased mental health as a result of the availability of this program. These preliminary results demonstrate that public libraries have great potential as partners in efforts to increase healthy lifestyles among Americans, particular older adults, who represent a growing demographic in the U.S. and around the world.

 
9:00am - 10:30amSupporting Open Research Data Practice Through Data Curation and Discovery: A Global Perspective [SDG 12]
 
 
ID: 154 / [Single Presentation of ID 154]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Open data, Data curation, Data Discovery, Data service, Research data management

Ying-Hsang Liu1, Hsin-Liang {Oliver} Chen2, Makoto P. Kato3, Mingfang Wu4, Isto Huvila5

1University of Southern Denmark, Denmark; 2Missouri University of Science and Technology, USA; 3University of Tsukuba, Japan; 4Australian Research Data Commons, Australia; 5Uppsala University, Sweden

This panel will address the issues associated with the practice and service of open research data curation and discovery from a global perspective. The sub-fields of information science such as information retrieval, information curation, information practices and human-centered data science have approached the open research data initiatives from multiple lenses. The issues of data creation, capturing, curation, sharing, discovery and reuse of cut across the sub-fields. We will identify and discuss the emerging themes in open data curation and discovery drawing on active research projects, repository practices and research data capturing and reuse in a selection of disciplines from health domain to archaeology and cultural heritage.

 
10:30am - 12:00pmunCommons: SIG-VIS Business Meeting

Zoom Meeting ID:  891 2205 5705
Passcode:  390670

 
11:00am - 12:30pmOpen Access in the Age of a Pandemic [SDGs 3, 16]
 
 
ID: 125 / [Single Presentation of ID 125]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Open access, scholarly communication, digital scholarship

Daniel G. Alemneh1, Suliman Hawamdeh1, Hsia-Ching {Carrie} Chang1, Abebe Rorissa2, Shimelis Assefa3, Kris Swen Helge4

1University of North Texas, USA; 2University at Albany, State University of New York, USA; 3University of Denver, USA; 4Texas Woman’s University, USA

The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the importance of transparency, open, and timely access to information. Open Access (OA) has the potential to increase the exposure and use of not only published research but also authoritative and reliable information. The Coronavirus (COVID-19) impacted the work of journalists, scientists, and doctors while ordinary citizens are seeking trusted information sources and the truth about the new virus. Government and private institutions worldwide are reacting to the new situation where researchers, educators, students, and staff are trying to adjust to remote teaching and learning as well as telecommuting. In March 2020, a message from the White House was sent to the Scholarly Publishing Community asking them to make all COVID-19 papers openly available and machine readable. Considering the evolving and unresolved issues around Open Access and scholarly communications, together with the UN 2030 Agenda (a plan of action for sustainable, universal development), this panel brings together diverse perspectives to review the current landscape of open access and shed light on the role it plays in such crises. The panel will also discuss the future implications and impact of the pandemic in the overall advancement of scholarship in general.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmOpportunities and Challenges of Self-Tracking Technologies: Understanding Information, Technology, and Users Through the Lens of Information Science [SDGs 12, 16]
 
 
ID: 349 / [Single Presentation of ID 349]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: Self-Tracking Technologies; Health Information Behavior; Challenges; Opportunities; Health Information Literacy; Data Privacy

Aylin Ilhan1, YuanYuan Feng2, Kaja J. Fietkiewicz1, Elizabeth V. Eikey3

1Heinrich Heine University, Germany; 2School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University, USA; 3Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, The Design Lab (UCSD), USA

Health self-tracking technologies are used for various reasons, from tracking of physical activity (e.g., counting steps) and supporting weight loss to managing chronic illness and monitoring fertility. In many cases, the technology is characterized as a facilitator, the user as the main actor, and the information as a foundation for achieving the desired outcome. Apart from obvious benefits such as gaining awareness of one’s body and health, users also face a range of challenges when using various self-tracking technologies. This panel focuses the discussion on opportunities and challenges of self-tracking technologies from the perspective of information science. Particularly, the panelists will address the importance of the information provided by self-tracking technologies, which is a critical component of the conceptual triad (information, technology, and users) to comprehensively understand the nature of human interactions with such technologies.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmPrioritizing Marginalized Populations in Information Science [SDGs 10, 16]
 
 
ID: 455 / [Single Presentation of ID 455]: 1
Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Accelerator Series
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: diversity

Vanessa L. Kitzie1, Amelia Gibson2, Abigail Phillips3, Arcadio Matos4

1University of South Carolina, USA; 2University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA; 3University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA; 4Rutgers University, USA

Our communities and society are increasingly diverse and should be adequately represented in library and information science (LIS) classrooms and literature (Cooke, 2016). In the past few years, the literature has increased, but LIS still has work to do in regard to amplifying marginalized voices (Gibson & Hughes-Hassell, 2017). This panel features researchers and LIS educators who advocate for, teach, and conduct research with marginalized populations in order to amplify and normalize the voices and experiences of those often thought of as “others”. Cooke, N. A. (2016). Information services to diverse populations: Developing culturally competent library professionals. ABC-CLIO. Gibson, A. N., & Hughes-Hassell, S. (2017). We will not be silent: Amplifying marginalized voices in LIS education and research. The Library Quarterly, 87(4), 317-329.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmPaper Session 14: Education and Bibliometrics [SDGs 4, 9, 12, 17]
Session Chair: Nestor L. Osorio, Northen Illinois University, United States of America
 
 
11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 181 / PS-14: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Research Methods
Keywords: JASIST, bibliometrics, publication trends, authorship, citations

Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology: Analysis of Two Decades of Published Research

Naresh Kumar Agarwal1, Md Anwarul Islam2

1Simmons University, USA; 2University of Dhaka, Bangladesh

The Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology (JASIST) is a leading information science journal, recognized by many ranking metrics. Understanding patterns in articles published would be helpful to new researchers seeking to publish with the journal. However, the last comprehensive bibliometric analysis on JASIST is more than a decade old. The objective of this paper is to analyze the bibliographic information of full-length research articles published in JASIST during the last two decades. This includes metrics such as article count, authorship, international collaboration, citations, and topical areas. Data was collected from SCOPUS, JASIST website, and Scimago. The findings show that JASIST published 3,052 articles during 2000-2020, which got cited 180,608 times (59.18 times per article) till date. Joint authorship and international collaboration has been increasing. Authors from institutions in 70 countries have published, with most articles from USA, with authorship from China steadily increasing in recent years. The detailed findings in the paper would help information science researchers and practitioners to assess the areas of focus, and various patterns in a top journal of the field. Such historical understanding is critical in charting agendas and directions for future research.



11:15am - 11:30am
ID: 283 / PS-14: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: citation analysis; bibliographic data; conceptual research strategy; disciplinary structure

The Evolution of LIS Research Topics and Methods from 2006 to 2018: A Content Analysis

Jinxuan Ma, Brady Lund

Emporia State University, USA

Replicating a series of studies of LIS research trends performed by Järvelin and colleagues, this content analysis systematically examines the evolution and distribution of LIS research topics and methods at six-year increments from 2006 to 2018. Bibliographic data was collected for 3422 articles published in LIS journals for the years of 2006, 2012, and 2018. Using a conceptual research strategy, the researchers identified the central research topics and research method for each article. The findings indicate a shift towards greater emphasis on Scholarly Communications/Informetrics and Information Seeking/Behavior topics, along with a reduction in Information Systems and Library and Information Service topics. Quantitative-based approaches are predominant across the three years examined, with observed growth in the usage of questionnaires and informetric methods from 2006 to 2018. These findings indicate that LIS is a dynamic discipline, with quickly shifting interests/usage of research topics and methods.



11:30am - 11:45am
ID: 297 / PS-14: 3
Long Papers
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Author Profiling, Machine Learning, Deep Learning, Pre-trained Models, Twitter

Authorship Analysis of English and Spanish Tweets

Mohammed Nour AlRashdan1, Malak Abdullah1, Mahmoud Al-Ayyoub1, Yaser Jararweh2

1Jordan University of Science and Technology, Kingdom of Hashemite; 2Duquesne University, USA

With the countless advantages gained from the free, open, and ubiquitous nature of online social networks, they do come with their own set of problems and challenges. E.g., they represent a fertile ground for fake accounts and autonomous bots to spread fake news. Revealing whether some text content is written by a bot or a human would be of great value in the fight against the spreading of fake news and misinformation. In this paper, we address this problem using different Machine Learning (ML) techniques: conventional, Deep Learning (DL) based and Transfer Learning (TL) based. Using the dataset of the well-known PAN 2019 Author Profiling Task, we show how relatively simple conventional ML methods can outperform DL and TL based ones for different languages (English and Spanish). In fact, our simplest model performs closely to the state-of-the-art (SOTA) systems for the English language and even outperforms the SOTA systems for the Spanish language.



11:45am - 12:00pm
ID: 358 / PS-14: 4
Long Papers
Topics: Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Keywords: cross-session search

Exploring Factors Affecting Renewal and Stopping Reasons in Cross-Session Search

Yuan Li, Rob Capra

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA

This study analyzes the relationships between search session renewal reasons and stopping reasons for everyday cross-session search, and their relationships with types of needed information, the number of search sessions, and task performance stage. We present results from an online survey questionnaire distributed on the Amazon Mechanical Turk platform. Our results validate the renewal reasons from Lin and Belkin’s MISE model and generalize the stopping reasons found by other empirical studies to a broader population and tasks. We found that participants in different renewal modes more often look for specific information than general information. Sessions which happened early or at the middle of a task were often renewed because a task spawned sub-problems or transmuted. Sessions renewed near the end or after the task was done often involved looking for updated information or were renewed due to search failure.

Our study has implications for predicting reasons that can cause searchers to start or stop a search session during cross session search, and on designing search support tools to provide more targeted, customized help based on the relations among those reasons.



12:00pm - 12:10pm
ID: 335 / PS-14: 5
Short Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Funding Prediction, Bibliometrics, Scholarly Network

Initial Bibliometric Investigation of NIH Mentored K to R Transition

Li Zhang1, Xiaoran Yan2, Patricia L. Mabry3, Brian C. Martinson3, Thomas W. Valente4, Wei Lu1, Xiaozhong Liu5

1School of Information Management, Wuhan University, People's Republic of China; 2Network Science Institute, Indiana University, USA; 3Department of Research, HealthPartners Institute, USA; 4Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, USCLA, USA; 5School of Informatics, Computing and Engineering, Indiana University, USA

National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the world largest public funder of biomedical research, investing more than $30 billion dollars to achieve its mission to enhance health, lengthen life, and reduce illness and disability. Here, by leveraging individual-level characteristics and contextual/time-dependent features of professional scholarly network, we investigate the chance of NIH Mentored K (MK) to NIH R01 grant (independent research grant) or equivalent (R01-Eq) transition success. The aim of this work is to explore the relationship between investigator productivity (i.e., scholarly publication) and success (e.g, R01-Eq funding) during MK to R01-Eq transition using publicly available datasets and applying our machine learning techniques. The preliminary experiment based on PubMed data and NIH awardees database show that the proposed method is promising, and a number of interesting funding success factors can be located by utilizing statistical tools.

 
2:00pm - 3:30pmunCommons: SIG-USE Business Meeting

Zoom Meeting ID: 892 8987 5277
Passcode: 958735

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmContainers, Genres, and Formats, Oh My: Creating Sustainable Concepts by Connecting Theory, Research, Practice, and Education [SDG 4]
 
 
ID: 248 / [Single Presentation of ID 248]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Genre theory, Information literacy, Research to practice, Source evaluation, Information formats

Brittany Brannon1, Tara Tobin Cataldo2, Robin Kear3, Ixchel Faniel1

1OCLC, USA; 2University of Florida, USA; 3University of Pittsburgh, USA

This interactive panel brings together researchers, leaders, practitioners, and educators to explore ways of connecting theory, research, practice, and LIS education around the issue of information format. Despite a growing awareness of the importance of information format to information seeking, discovery, use, and creation, LIS has no sound, theoretically-informed basis for describing or discussing elements of format, with researchers and practitioners alike relying on know-it-when-they-see-it understandings of format types. The Researching Students’ Information Choices project has attempted to address this issue by developing the concept of containers, one element of format, and locating it within a descriptive taxonomy of other format elements based on well-established theories from the field of Rhetorical Genre Studies. This panel will discuss how this concept was developed and implemented in a multi-institutional, IMLS-grant-funded research project and how panelists are currently deploying and planning to deploy this concept in their own practice. Closing the loop in this way creates sustainable concepts that build a stronger field overall. Audience members are invited to contribute research-to-practice gaps observed in their own work and workshop ideas for actionable steps to address those gaps.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmPaper Session 15: Responsible Production and Consumption of Information [SDGs 9, 10, 12, 13, 16]
Session Chair: Gary Burnett, Florida State University, United States of America
 
 
4:00pm - 4:15pm
ID: 113 / PS-15: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: E-government; Term hierarchy; Spectral clustering; Ontology; Thesaurus; Information retrieval

An Ontology Automation Construction Scheme for Chinese E-government Thesaurus Optimizing

Hao Wang1,2, Wei Zhang1,2, Sanhong Deng1,2, Baolong Zhang1,2

1School of Information Management of Nanjing University, Peoples Republic of China; 2Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Data Engineering and Knowledge Service, Nanjing University, Peoples Republic of China

[Purpose/significance] To optimize the term hierarchy in the manual e-government thesaurus, we combine the mainstream knowledge organization technology to form a complete set of ontology automation construction scheme. [Method/process] We build an e-government knowledge base by using subject words in the Comprehensive E-government Thesaurus as the term set and encyclopedia text as the corpus. The specific work includes the extraction of semantic features from the bag-of-words model, determination of the number of clusters by linear and nonlinear dimensionality reduction, division of terms by spectral clustering, social network analysis to determine the class label, and storing knowledge ontology via OWL. [Result/Conclusion] The recall rate of term hierarchy in the ontology is excellent, indicating the ontology has good knowledge extensibility, and also proving the efficiency of the scheme proposed in this work. Besides, the application model of a term hierarchy in information retrieval can show a richer semantic relation than the original thesaurus to guide the retrieval extension of government information resources.



4:15pm - 4:30pm
ID: 284 / PS-15: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Open Government Data (OGD); findability; accessibility; user behaviors; transaction log analysis

Understanding Users’ Accessing Behaviors to Local Open Government Data via Transaction Log Analysis

Fanghui Xiao, Zhendong Wang, Daqing He

University of Pittsburgh, USA

The rapid development of Open Government Data (OGD) and the increasing attention on data use/reuse have stimulated many studies on data-related issues. However, the findability of OGD is still one of the major challenges. Aiming to ameliorate the situation that “data is hard to find”, this paper examines OGD users’ needs and accessing behaviors when interacting with local OGD portals. Transaction log analysis and web content mining were used in order to obtain insights from large groups of OGD users in an unobtrusive manner. Through analyzing transaction log data from three local OGD portals, including Open Data Philly (opendataphilly.org), Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center (wprdc.org) and Analyze Boston (data.boston.gov), our study shows that users relied on different channels to enter local OGD portals, and such channels have different impacts on user success in finding the sought-after data. We also find that OGD users prefer browsing over searching when inside the portals, the utilization of different browsing entries, and users’ data needs.



4:30pm - 4:45pm
ID: 337 / PS-15: 3
Long Papers
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: federal data curation, records schedules, digital preservation

Scientific Data Management in the Federal Government: A Case Study of NOAA and Responsibility for Preserving Digital Data

Adam Kriesberg, Jacob Kowall

Simmons University, USA

In this paper, we examine the ways in which the evolution of federal and agency-specific data management policies has affected and continues to affect the long-term preservation of digital scientific data produced by the United States government. After reviewing the existing literature on the role of archival theory and practice in the preservation of scientific data, we present the case of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to analyze how data management activities at this agency are shaped by legislative mandates as well as both government-wide and agency-specific information-management policies. Through the connected network of law, federal policy, agency policy, and the records schedules which govern recordkeeping practice in the federal government, we propose a number of further questions on how government agencies can effectively provide for the management of scientific data as federal records.



4:45pm - 4:55pm
ID: 232 / PS-15: 4
Short Papers
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Social Media Users, Information Sharing Behavior, Setting Limits, Influencing Factors

Social Media Users’ Behavior of Setting Limits in Information Sharing: A Heuristic Study Based on WeChat Moments

Guangchun Zheng, Zelong Zhao

Renmin University, People's Republic of China

Social media has become an important platform for users to share information in recent years. A large number of active users are sharing their daily lives and social issues in various platforms. At the same time, an interesting phenomenon is that functions like "three days visible" and "selected contacts visible" are also popular among users. In order to explore the information sharing behavior from the perspective of why users set these limits, we made a 15-day observation on 21 college students' sharing behavior on WeChat Moments and conducted in-depth interviews with 16 of them. The study summarizes the characteristics of users who set different types of limits from the observation. Sixteen factors influencing the behavior of setting limits were identified and categorized into three dimensions: social, psychological and technical.



4:55pm - 5:05pm
ID: 320 / PS-15: 5
Short Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: open data, public libraries, data services, library services, government information

Open Data in Public Libraries: Gauging Activities and Supporting Ambitions

Kaitlin Fender Throgmorton, Bree Norlander, Carole L. Palmer

University of Washington, USA

As the open data movement grows, public libraries must assess if and how to invest resources in this new service area. This paper reports on a recent survey on open data in public libraries across Washington state, conducted by the Open Data Literacy project (ODL) in collaboration with the Washington State Library. Results document interests and activity in open data across small, medium, and large libraries in relation to traditional library services and priorities. Libraries are particularly active in open data through reference services and are beginning to release their own library data to the public. While capacity and resource challenges hinder progress for some, many libraries, large and small, are making progress on new initiatives, including strategic collaborations with local government agencies. Overall, the level and range of activity suggest that Washington state public libraries of all sizes recognize the value of open data for their communities, with a groundswell of libraries moving beyond ambition to action as they develop new services through evolution and innovation.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmPaper Session 16: Epistemology and Pedagogy [SDGs 4, 12, 16]
Session Chair: John Budd, University of Missouri, United States of America
 
 
4:00pm - 4:15pm
ID: 180 / PS-16: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: identity, LIS education, information science

Information Science Identity: Students’ Perspective

Yuanye Ma, Cami Goray

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA

We present a qualitative study that maps Library and Information Science (LIS) students’ understanding of their information science identity. The mapping is achieved through exploring multiple aspects of this identity, including students’ conceptualization of the field and related disciplines, their evaluation of coursework, and their future career expectations. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with undergraduate and graduate LIS students in the spring of 2020. Five themes were identified through the coding process, which include: how students conceptualized the field in general, the people focus in information science, students’ explicit expression of difficulty in describing the field, coursework representative of information science, and how students relate information science studies to their intended career path. Leveraging the students’ perspective to frame this identity question is valuable, because it offers an opportunity to understand the Library and Information Science identity in its formative stages.



4:15pm - 4:30pm
ID: 312 / PS-16: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: epistemicide, epistemic injustice, epistemic justice, social justice, epistemology

Toward Epistemic Justice: An approach for conceptualizing epistemicide in the information professions

Beth Patin, Melinda Sebastian, Jieun Yeon, Danielle Bertolini

Syracuse University, USA

The goal of this exploratory paper is to begin to explicate the concept of epistemicide and articulate its function within the information field. We define epistemicide as the killing, silencing, annihilation, or devaluing of a knowledge system. It is not that we are unaware of the injustices happening within our field, but rather, that we are not in discussion across sub-fields considering the idea that the collective injustices exist and are problematic on individual and systemic levels. We believe epistemicide happens when several epistemic injustices, such as hermeneutical or testimonial injustices, occur collectively reflecting a structured and systemic oppression of particular ways of knowing. We present epistemicide and epistemic injustice as a concept for understanding and addressing ways knowledge systems are silenced, devalued, or annihilated within Library and Information Science (LIS).



4:30pm - 4:40pm
ID: 136 / PS-16: 3
Short Papers
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Information Behavior, social media, information theory

A Review of Truth-Default Theory: Implications for Information Behavior Research

Tara Zimmerman1, Njeri Millicent1, Malak Khader1, Jeff Allen1, Amy Rosellini1, Tresia Eaves1,2

1University of North Texas, USA; 2Protiviti, USA

Determining truth and accuracy of information is a key challenge in today’s fast-paced, global information economy dominated by social media. The field of Information Science (IS), while publishing extensively on information seeking and use, has not done sufficient research into how individuals detect falsehood or deception in information they encounter. This paper describes Levine’s Truth-Default Theory (TDT), based on his work in the field of social psychology, and links information behavior (IB) research to three vital aspects of the theory. Furthermore, this work demonstrates how TDT can be merged with T.D. Wilson’s General Theory of Information Behavior, applying decades of research on deception detection to foundational IB theory. Implications of marrying these two ideas are discussed as well as suggestions for future research.



4:40pm - 4:50pm
ID: 171 / PS-16: 4
Short Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Data-Focused Curriculum, iSchool Education, Library and Information Science Education, Data Science Education

Identifying Data-Focused Curriculum in Worldwide iSchools: Preliminary Data Acquisition for Asia-Pacific and European Members

Wei Jeng1, Fu-Hsuan Tsai1, Jian-Sin Lee2

1National Taiwan University, Taiwan; 2University of Washington, USA

This paper reports the data cleansing and labeling procedures for identifying 215 data-focused courses from 1627 courses offered in 22 iSchool members as of 2019. This preliminary data acquisition is to serve as a starting point for further conducting regular, greater-scaled data acquisition in data-focused curriculum across all the iSchools in the near future. The challenges we encountered preliminary data collection include course catalog unavailability, disambiguation, and lack of data for investigating the evolution of courses.

Next steps of this study are to expand our data collection to all the iSchool members and create an interactive data dashboard with periodically automatic data acquisition over time. We anticipate such public datasets and interactive visualizations are beneficial for iSchool educators and researchers who are interested in the development of data-focused curricula, as well as potential students.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmReimagining Information Science and Technology Beyond Traditional Boundaries in the Global Coronavirus Pandemic Situation [SDGs 3, 17]
 
 
ID: 182 / [Single Presentation of ID 182]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Domain-Specific Informatics
Keywords: Emergency Management, Homeland Security, Cybersecurity, Information Science and Technology

Abebe Rorissa1, Ming Li2, Michael Young1, David Turetsky1, Xiaojun {Jenny} Yuan1

1University at Albany, State University of New York, USA; 2Marsh and McLennan, USA

Information pervades today’s human activities, essentially making every sector of society an information environment. Due to the ubiquity of technological innovations and their interconnectivity, there is no aspect of lives of individuals that has not been affected. Individuals & organizations use multiple devices and networking platforms to interact with each other, businesses, and governments, as well as to search, retrieve, and consume information. Adoption and use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and the nature of information in general and its management and use have been topics of discussion at events such as the ASIS&T Annual Meeting. However, what is often lacking, if not missing, is a broader discussion about information and ICTs, in applied areas such as emergency management, homeland security, and cybersecurity.

 
6:00pm - 7:00pmCoffee, Tea and Cocktails Social Hour

Zoom Meeting ID: 926 321 2704 
Passcode: asistam20 

 
Date: Wednesday, 28/Oct/2020
7:30am - 8:30amCoffee, Tea and Cocktails Social Hour

Zoom Meeting ID: 926 321 2704 
Passcode: asistam20 

 
9:00am - 10:30amPaper Session 17: Archives, Curation and Preservation [SDGs 1-17]
Session Chair: Jeonghyun Kim, University of North Texas, United States of America
 
 
9:00am - 9:15am
ID: 164 / PS-17: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Reproducibility, data curation, data reuse, data sharing, earth system science

Cross-Disciplinary Data Practices in Earth System Science: Aligning Services with Reuse and Reproducibility Priorities

An Yan, Caihong Huang, Jian-Sin Lee, Carole Palmer

University of Washington, USA

As a data intensive field that unites researchers from many disciplines, Earth System Science (ESS) is an ideal site for examining evolving cross-disciplinary data practices. This paper reports on results from a survey examining data sharing, data reuse, and research reproducibility practices of ESS researchers, aimed at informing improvements in data services for interdisciplinary sciences. Data reuse was found to be very high for new and comparative analyses but very limited for reproducing research. Data sharing was also strong, mostly through supplements to published papers, with moderate use of open access repositories. At the same time, there was interesting variability in both data sharing and reuse among ESS disciplines. The most pronounced challenges to reuse and reproducibility stem from limited documentation on how data are collected and managed, practices that are poorly supported by institutions, funders, and publishers. A more refined approach to “reproducibility” is needed that aligns with priorities and practices within the research community. Just as importantly, advances in data service models for ESS and other interdisciplinary fields need to account for the diverse and distributed system of repositories and require building a workforce with deeper knowledge of the complex data and methods that drive integrative systems science.



9:15am - 9:30am
ID: 184 / PS-17: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Emulation practices, software preservation, access

Emulation Encounters: Software Preservation in Libraries, Archives, and Museums

Amelia Acker

University of Texas at Austin, USA

This paper reports on early findings of research in 2019 following 3 small teams of information professionals as they implemented emulation strategies into their day-to-day work at a museum, a university research library, and a university research archive and technology lab. Findings are reported from workplace observations and semi-structured interviews with preservationists (N=25) as they implement software emulation programs in cultural heritage institutions that collect and preserve software for access. Results suggest that the distributed teams in this cohort of preservationists have developed different emulation practices for particular kinds of “emulation encounters” in supporting different types of use and users. I discuss the implications of these findings for digital preservation research and emulation initiatives providing access to software or software-dependent objects, showing how implications of these findings have significance for those developing software preservation workflows and building emulation capacities. This article suggests that there are different emulation practices for preservation, research access, and exhibition undertaken by preservationists in libraries, archives, and museums; and in examining particular visions of access these findings call into question software emulation as a single, static preservation strategy for cultural heritage institutions.



9:30am - 9:45am
ID: 279 / PS-17: 3
Long Papers
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: Software Curation, Software Sustainability, Open-source software, Data Curation

Finite and Infinite Games: An Ethnography of Institutional Logics in Research Software Sustainability

Nicholas Weber

University of Washington, USA

Modern research is inescapably digital, with data and publications most often created, analyzed, and stored electronically, using tools and methods expressed in software. While some of this software is general-purpose office software, a great deal of it is developed specifically for research, often by researchers themselves. Research software is essential to progress in science, engineering, and all other fields, but it is often not developed, shared, or stored in a sustainable way. The following paper presents findings from an ethnography of two research software projects that have, over the last ten years, cooperatively organized development efforts to produce important software enabling scientific breakthroughs in both astronomy and macromolecular modeling. The work of these two projects are framed in terms of James Carse’s model of finite and infinite games. I argue that by incentivizing institutional governance that resembles the design of an infinite game, funding agencies can increase the sustainability of research software and improve various aspects of data-driven scientific discovery.



9:45am - 10:00am
ID: 324 / PS-17: 4
Long Papers
Topics: Archives; Data Curation; and Preservation
Keywords: long tail, data curation, topic analysis, research funding, astronomy

Mapping The “Long Tail” Of Research Funding: A Topic Analysis Of NSF Grant Proposals In The Division Of Astronomical Sciences

Gretchen Renee Stahlman1, P. Bryan Heidorn2

1Rutgers University, School of Communication & Information, USA; 2University of Arizona, School of Information, USA

“Long tail” data are considered to be smaller, heterogeneous, researcher-held data, which present unique data management and scholarly communication challenges. These data are presumably concentrated within relatively lower-funded projects due to insufficient resources for curation. To better understand the nature and distribution of long tail data, we examine National Science Foundation (NSF) funding patterns using Latent Dirichlet Analysis (LDA) and bibliographic data. We also introduce the concept of “Topic Investment” to capture differences in topics across funding levels and to illuminate the distribution of funding across topics. This study uses the discipline of astronomy as a case study, overall exploring possible associations between topic, funding level and research output, with implications for research policy and practice. We find that while different topics demonstrate different funding levels and publication patterns, dynamics predicted by the “long tail” theoretical framework presented here can be observed within NSF-funded topics in astronomy.

 
9:00am - 10:30amPaper Session 18: Data Science [SDGs 4, 8, 9]
Session Chair: Chirag Shah, University of Washington, United States of America
 
 
9:00am - 9:15am
ID: 147 / PS-18: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Data Science; Competency Framework; Human-Centered Approaches; Employment Analysis

An Analysis on Competency of Human-centered Data Science Employment

Dan Wu, Siyu Lv, Hao Xu

Wuhan University, People's Republic of China

The rapid rise of data science has brought about the problem of talent gaps and concerns about employment competency development. This paper performed a study on the analysis of data science employment market in the information science context with open data from online recruitment website. In addition to basic qualitative analysis and descriptive statistical summarization of advertisement characteristics, it mainly established a competency framework of data science workforce with the method of content analysis. The objective is through market needs to provide guidance for institutions planning for or revising a major in data science, help bridge the gap between the high demand and low supply of data scientists and enable existing data science teams to operate more efficiently. Our working results indicate that the market is looking for ways in which humans can integrate their roles into data science, and these methods depend on the spread of how to use human-centered data science and its benefits, the operating mechanism of which is explained by our proposed model.



9:15am - 9:30am
ID: 160 / PS-18: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Privacy and Ethics
Keywords: Ethics of Artificial Intelligence (AI); Social factors in Data Science; Knowledge Infrastructures; Value Sensitive Design (VSD); Social Informatics

Good Systems, Bad Data? Interpretations of AI Hype and Failures

Stephen C. Slota1, Kenneth R. Fleischmann1, Sherri R. Greenberg2, Nitin Verma1, Brenna Cummings2, Lan Li1, Chris Shenefiel3

1School of Information, University of Texas at Austin, USA; 2LBJ School of Public Affairs, University of Texas at Austin, USA; 3Cisco Systems, USA

Artificial intelligence (AI), including machine learning (ML), is widely viewed as having substantial transformative potential across society, and novel implementations of these technologies promise new modes of living, working, and community engagement. Data and the algorithms that operate upon it thus operate under an expansive ethical valence, bearing consequence to both the development of these potentially transformative technologies and our understanding of how best to manage and support its impact. This research reports upon an interview-driven study of professional stakeholders engaged with technology development, policy, and law relating to AI. Among our studied experts, unexpected outcomes and flawed implementations of AI, especially those leading to negative social consequences, are often attributed to ill-structured, incomplete, or biased data, and the algorithms and interpretations that might produce negative social consequence are seen as neutrally representing the data, or otherwise blameless in that consequence. We propose a more complex infrastructural view of the tools, data, and operation of AI systems as necessary to the production of social good, and explore how representations of the successes and failures of these systems, even among experts, tend to valorize algorithmic analysis and locate fault at the quality of the data rather than the implementation of systems.



9:30am - 9:40am
ID: 252 / PS-18: 3
Short Papers
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Relation extraction, Information extraction, Scholarly text mining, Knowledge graphs

Targeting Precision: A Hybrid Scientific Relation Extraction Pipeline for Improved Scholarly Knowledge Organization

Ming Jiang1, Jennifer D'Souza2, Sören Auer2, J. Stephen Downie1

1University of Illinois at Urbana and Champaign, USA; 2TIB Leibniz Information Centre for Science and Technology, L3S Research Center at Leibniz University of Hannover, Germany

Knowledge graphs have been successfully built from unstructured texts in general domains such as newswire by leveraging distant supervision relation signals from linked data repositories such as DBpedia. In contrast, the lack of a comprehensive ontology of scholarly relations makes it difficult to similarly adopt distant supervision to create knowledge graphs over scholarly articles. In light of this difficulty, we propose a hybrid approach to extract scientific concept relations from scholarly publications by: 1) utilizing syntactic rules as a form of distant supervision to link related scientific term pairs; and 2) training a classifier to further identify the relation type per pair. Our system targets a high-precision performance objective as opposed to high recall, aiming to reduce the noisy results albeit at the cost of extracting fewer relations when building scholarly knowledge graphs over massive-scale publications. Results on two benchmark datasets show that our hybrid system surpasses the state-of-the-art with an overall 60% F1 score led by the nearly 15% precision boost in identifying related scientific concepts. We further achieved an overall F1 in the range 34.1% to 51.2%, on relation classification, per experimental dataset.



9:40am - 9:50am
ID: 328 / PS-18: 4
Short Papers
Topics: Privacy and Ethics
Keywords: data science ethics, serious games, diversity

Advancing Diversity in Human Centered Data Science Education Through Games

Bernease R. Herman1, Cecilia Aragon1, Sarah Evans2, Lea Shanley3

1University of Washington, USA; 2University of North Texas, USA; 3Nelson Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA

Educational games, particularly those that encourage collaboration with peers and focusing on social and ethical issues, may be powerful in improving retention of human computer interaction (HCI) and human centered data science (HCDS) concepts among young people by providing strong emotional experiences. Further, games have the potential of reaching a wider and more diverse population than formal education. We draw upon prior experience with improving diversity in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) as well as experience building and deploying HCDS games to suggest novel uses of gaming to increase the retention of concepts in HCI and data science among diverse learners.



9:50am - 10:00am
ID: 361 / PS-18: 5
Short Papers
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Analysis Framework; Open Academic Graph; Research Frontier Analysis; Subject Topic Evolution Analysis

An Analysis Framework of Research Frontiers Based on The Large-scale Open Academic Graph

Hongyu Wang1,2, Han Huang2, Xiaoguang Wang2

1University of Texas at Austin, USA; 2Wuhan University, People's Republic of China

[Purpose] As a high-quality and well-structured dataset, the large-scale open academic graph formed under the influence of the open science movement has created new research conditions for research frontier analysis. Constructing the analysis framework of research frontiers based on the large-scale open academic graph can effectively promote the realization of data-driven knowledge discovery and the analysis and decision-making of sci-tech intelligence. [Approach] The definition and analysis methods of research frontiers were summarized through related studies, and the data structure of the specific open academic graph was investigated. [Findings] The thoughts and steps of research frontier analysis based on the open academic graph were put forward, and an available analysis framework of research frontiers based on the large-scale open academic graph was constructed. [Value] The proposed framework can achieve deep, relevant and dynamic analysis of research frontiers in various disciplines based on the emerging large-scale open academic graph. It will provide a novel perspective for performing dynamic analysis across time and space, multidimensional analysis under multiple factors, and multiscale evolution analysis of research frontiers.

 
9:00am - 10:30amPulling Back the Curtain on Conducting Social Impact Research [SDG 12]
 
 
ID: 289 / [Single Presentation of ID 289]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Research Methods
Keywords: Social impact, research methods, information practices, information behavior

Rebekah Willson1, Devon Greyson2, Amelia Gibson3, Jenny Bronstein4

1McGill University, Canada; 2University of Massachusetts, USA; 3University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA; 4Bar-Ilan University, Israel

Conducting research that has social impact is more than simply disseminating research when it is completed. It is more than looking at the influence research has on a research field or discipline. Conducting research that has social impact is a process of engaging communities in the research process and ensuring that the communities that take part in the research experience benefits. Socially impactful research is messy and challenging. It takes commitment from researchers to consider social impact and integrate practices into the entire research process from planning to collecting data, to communicating and implementing findings with communities. While this research is taking place within the field of information behavior/information practices, many of the ways this research is carried out are hidden. In this panel, four information behavior/information practice researchers will discuss research projects that have social impact and “pull back the curtain” on their approach to this research, what this means practically for carrying out this research, as well as how research findings are communicated and applied.

 
9:00am - 10:30amThe Use of ICT During COVID-19 [SDGs 3, 17]
 
 
ID: 242 / [Single Presentation of ID 242]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: ICT use, COVID-19, global crisis, health informatics, social informatics

Shengnan Yang1, Pnina Fichman1, Xiaohua Zhu2, Madelyn Sanfilippo3, Shijuan Li5, Kenneth R. Fleischmann4

1Indiana University Bloomington, USA; 2University of Tennessee, USA; 3Princeton University, USA; 4University of Texas at Austin, USA; 5Peking University, China

ICTs are pivotal in the existing social order and especially during the COVID-19 global pandemic. This panel focuses on the use of ICTs by different actors, including individuals, nonprofit organizations, and governments around the globe in responding to this COVID crisis. We tackle three essential questions about ICTs and the global crisis. First, what role do ICTs play in a global crisis? Second, how do ICTs affect social order when tensions between control, autonomy, and power shift? Third, what are the theoretical and practical implications of ICT use during a global health crisis? Each of the panelists will discuss their ongoing research in social informatics or health informatics as relates to the panel theme and central questions in order to provide a holistic view of the role of ICTs during this global pandemic.

 
11:00am - 11:40amFrom Cooperation to Collaboration: Developing and Implementing a Research-Based Framework for Information Organizations [SDG 17]
 
 
ID: 172 / [Single Presentation of ID 172]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
40 minutes
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: collaboration, partnerships, LIS education

Laura Saunders1, Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe2

1Simmons University, USA; 2University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

Information professionals are expected to engage in collaboration in developing and delivering programs and services, creating systems, and conducting research, as evidenced by attention to collaboration in various standards and guidelines. However, when assessed against a collaboration spectrum (Himmelman, 2002) many existing collaborative projects lack the characteristics of an integrated partnership, meaning they may not be reaping the full benefits of collaboration, including ability to leverage each other’s resources, expertise, and respective audiences. In this session, the presenters will share their Framework for Collaboration (Saunders & Corning, 2020), reviewing common barriers to collaboration and discussing approaches for overcoming those barriers. They will share best practices for meaningful collaboration, including identifying community needs and potential partners; aligning vision and goals; and implementing and managing a successful collaboration.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmAllyship and Mentorship of Diverse Information Science Faculty [SDGs 10, 16, 17]
 
 
ID: 456 / [Single Presentation of ID 456]: 1
Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Accelerator Series
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: diversity, mentorship

Africa Hands1, Marisa Duarte2, Michelle Kazmer3, Denise Agosto4

1East Carolina University, USA; 2Arizona State University, USA; 3Florida State University, USA; 4Drexel University, USA

Library and information science (LIS) has some amazing scholars of colors in the professoriate, and in order to keep them and recruit more, LIS needs to have more purposeful and consistent conversations about allyship and mentorship (Cooke and Sánchez, 2019). This panel features faculty of color and white allies in conversation about the current state and future of the LIS professoriate for diverse faculty members and doctoral students. Cooke, N. A., & Sánchez, J. O. (2019). Getting it on the Record: Faculty of Color in Library and Information Science. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, 60(3), 169-181.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmInformation Intensive Industries: Trends and Challenges in the Road Ahead [SDGs 9, 12, 16]
 
 
ID: 473 / [Single Presentation of ID 473]: 1
Industry Series
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: digital content; information

Lynn Silipigni Connaway4, Bernard "Jim" Jansen5, Alex Kasprak1, Cathy King2, Mounia Lalmas3

1Snopes.com, USA; 2OCLC, Inc.; 3Spotify, UK; 4OCLC Research, USA; 5The Pennsylvania State University, USA

Information Intensive Industries are a spectrum of businesses and organizations that provide a variety of information products, services, distribution channels, and devices. These industries are, and have been for some time, a rapidly growing part of the world economy. This growth reflects the increased demand for information goods and services by consumers, business, non-profits, educational institutions, and governments. It is difficult to imagine an aspect of our lives that have not been impacted by Information Intensive Industries. There have been great benefits, including music, digital content, motion pictures, gaming, IT devices, social media platforms, and discovery systems, among many others. However, these great benefits, also have come great challenges, which must be addressed by these Information Intensive Industries. Cathy King, OCLC, Inc., will identify how internal and external research and customer feedback influence product development. Alex Kasprak, Snopes.com, will discuss the methods used to identify and investigate social media manipulation operations while highlighting the rapid dissemination of dangerous online misinformation. Mounia Lalmas will describe the role of research at Spotify.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmPaper Session 19: Film, Digital and Social Media [SDGs 3, 4, 12]
Session Chair: Lisa Hussey, Simmons Univeristy, United States of America
 
 
11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 224 / PS-19: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: LGBT, Health, Social Media, Twitter, Text Mining

Analyzing Health Tweets of LGB and Transgender Individuals

Amir Karami, Frank Webb

University of South Carolina, USA

There are millions of LGB and transgender individuals in the world. However, conducting LGBT health-related studies are labor-intensive and time-consuming because of the challenges inherent in studying these hidden populations. Social media sites like Twitter provide a platform for LGBT users to share their health concerns, giving researchers the opportunity to collect and analyze these social comments. This research used a mixed method to examine the linguistic and semantic characteristics of health-related tweets shared by self-identified LGBT individuals. Findings uncovered several health-related topics shared by LGBT users. Further, while LGB and transgender communities are within the LGBT umbrella, we found a significant linguistic difference between the tweets shared by LGB and transgender individuals. These findings show further disparities within an already marginalized group, indicating the need for customized healthcare to improve the health of all people. Our research approach can also inform studies in the areas of informatics, health, and medicine for analyzing the health concerns of not only sexual and gender minorities but also other hidden populations.



11:15am - 11:25am
ID: 175 / PS-19: 2
Short Papers
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Recreated actors, film credits, attribution, creative responsibility

Recreated Actors and Attribution: An Analysis of Film Crediting Practices

Brian Dobreski, Cassidy Thompson

University of Tennessee, USA

New technologies are challenging traditional notions and practices of attribution, or how creative responsibility is understood and expressed. A prominent example is the recreation of deceased or unavailable actors in new film performances. Manufactured through the use of doubles, CGI, and reference footage, these performances are the result of complex, shared creative responsibilities. This study looks to the credits for these films as a means of exploring attribution in such cases. Researchers identified 19 feature films utilizing recreated performances and conducted a content analysis of the films’ closing credits, focusing on attributive statements associated with recreated actors and their roles. Results show that, even with minimal or no active involvement, deceased actors tend to receive the major acting credit, while doubles receive lesser or no credit at all. As such, film credits do not serve as traditional descriptive metadata per se, but must negotiate a number of functions simultaneously, highlighting their role as paratexts that use attribution to blur the lines between narrative and external realities. Attribution is used to support the authenticity of these performances, downplaying or obscuring complex creative responsibilities in the process.



11:25am - 11:35am
ID: 286 / PS-19: 3
Short Papers
Topics: Privacy and Ethics
Keywords: Cookie policy; Readability; Flesch Reading Ease; Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level; Social Media;

Do You Know What’s in Those Cookies? An Analysis of the Readability of Social Media Cookie Policies

Elizabeth Dunn

University of North Texas, USA

Spend any time on the web and you will likely be prompted with a disclosure about cookies. The purpose of this exploratory study is to address the readability of cookie policies by examining a sample of popular social media websites operating in the United States. Flesch Reading Ease index and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level were used to assess the readability of select social media cookie policies. The results of this study suggest that the cookie policies of these sites are incongruous with the readability requirements for the average U.S. adult. Opportunities for future research to address questions related to coherence as well as the use, function, and purpose of cookies are discussed.



11:35am - 11:45am
ID: 295 / PS-19: 4
Short Papers
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: document experience, fan fiction; personally meaningful; everyday

Live Writing: Modeling a Creative Activity in a Virtual Small World

Priya Kizhakkethil

University of North Texas, USA

Looking at fan fiction writing as a personally meaningful activity, this paper covers the preliminary stage in developing a model to look at this creative activity based on extant document experience literature and models. The preliminary data analysis points to the importance of the social context in which the activity takes place, highlighting the role that social ties in the form of fellow readers play in the process. Exploratory in nature and coming as a byproduct of data analysis, it is hoped this will aid conceptual development in information and document experience, while adding to studies that look at personally meaningful information activities.

 
11:00am - 12:30pmunCommons: SIG-III Business Meeting

Zoom Meeting ID: 843 8759 5784
Passcode: 597359

 
1:00pm - 2:30pmSIG-DL Business Meeting

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83466195405

Meeting ID: 834 6619 5405
Passcode: 860110

 
1:00pm - 2:30pmSIG-KM Business Meeting

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86740745489

Meeting ID: 867 4074 5489
Passcode: 929298

 
4:00pm - 4:40pmHow to Undertake Ideologically Contentious Research: Leaning on Reflexivity and Positionality to Address Uncomfortable Disjunctures in Information Research [SDGs 4, 12]
 
 
ID: 274 / [Single Presentation of ID 274]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
40 minutes
Topics: Research Methods
Keywords: Research methods, positionality, reflexivity, ethics

Shannon Oltmann1, Sarah Barriage1, Devon Greyson2, Matthew Vaughn3

1University of Kentucky, USA; 2University of Massachusetts, USA; 3Indiana University, USA

In this 40-minute panel, four researchers who study contentious issues will discuss those topics and address how they navigate ideological disagreements with their research participants. Reflexivity and positionality are two analytical tools that are useful in this process of unpacking research. We describe these concepts and position our own research within these spaces.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmPaper Session 20: International Information Action [SDGs 1-17]
Session Chair: Denise Agosto, Drexel University, United States of America
 
 
4:00pm - 4:10pm
ID: 280 / PS-20: 1
Short Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Sustainable Development Goals, libraries, information literacy, community engagement

Libraries and the UN Sustainable Development Goals: The Past, Present, and Future

Christopher Cyr, Lynn Silipigni Connaway

OCLC, USA

This paper presents initial research from a broader project about the impact of libraries on the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In 2015, the UN launched the SDGs, a set of 17 goals for global development by the year 2030. Libraries helped shape the inclusion of access to information in these goals and are involved in furthering them through providing access to information. The OCLC Global Council has selected the SDGs as its area of focus for 2020, and is formulating a research program that will identify and advocate for the ways that libraries can help further the SDGs. This paper details the history of the SDGs and the role that libraries played in shaping them. It shows examples of ways that libraries have helped further them through providing access to information and information literacy skills. Finally, it offers suggestions for ways that libraries could structure their information activates around the SDGs, based on data from a survey of OCLC Global Council delegates.



4:10pm - 4:20pm
ID: 310 / PS-20: 2
Short Papers
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Bibliometric study; cyber-activism; digital citizenship; social movements; R&D project; bibliographic databases

Bibliometric Analysis of the Cibermov Database on Cyber-Activism (2007-2018)

María-Ángeles López-Hernández, Rubén Domínguez-Delgado, Irene Tenorio-Vázquez

University of Seville, Spain

We carried out a bibliometric study on web activism, given their absence, for the period between 2007 and 2018, using as a source the Cibermov bibliographic database, created by the documentation service linked to the R&D project Cyber-activism, digital citizenship and new urban movements, funded by the Government of Spain, as a tool for its members.



4:20pm - 4:30pm
ID: 333 / PS-20: 3
Short Papers
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Information Diffusion, Twitter, Transnational Dissemination, Content Analysis

Characteristics of Information Spreading Across Nations

Xinchen Yu, Shashidhar Reddy Daida, Lasya Bentula, Lingzi Hong

University of North Texas, USA

The mechanism of information diffusion on social media platforms such as retweeting in Twitter has been largely studied. Existing studies mainly look into the social or discursive features of information that are popular in virtual space, few have related the diffusion of information to the real-world context and studied the characteristics of information that can spread across nations. In the context of globalization, understanding information spreading across nations not only facilitates marketing and propagation but also helps to understand transnational activities such as transnational social movements. We conduct a preliminary study to analyze the sentiment and cognition components of tweets that disseminate transnationally in the MeToo movement. Tweets that spread across nations are generally popular, i.e. retweeted more. However, popular tweets do not always spread across nations. We find popular tweets that disseminate transnationally contain more elements of politics, religion, or social bond indicators. Our study provides insights for propagation in globalization and may help social movement organizations that aim for transnational activities.



4:30pm - 4:40pm
ID: 356 / PS-20: 4
Short Papers
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Making, geopolitics, Africa, Silicon Valley, China

Making as Imaginative Crossroads: Ghanaian Makers and the Geopolitics of Technological Progress

Seyram Avle

University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA

This paper is about the politics of technological progress as it is being played out among a loose network of Ghanaian makers. It unpacks how the practice of ‘making’ unfolds as a site for positioning the self and the nation within a global imaginary of techno futures. The paper argues, first, that ‘making’ in Ghana is emblematic of a crossroads of imaginative possibilities for technological design and production, and second, that this marks a distinct turn in the politics of technological progress, particularly when situated against ongoing econo-political negotiations between the Global South, the West, and China.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmPaper Session 21: Sustainable Cities and Communities [SDGs 4, 8, 9, 11, 12, 17]
Session Chair: Dania Bilal, University of Tennessee, United States of America
 
 
4:00pm - 4:15pm
ID: 260 / PS-21: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Privacy and Ethics
Keywords: surveillance, privacy, "smart home, " privacy paradox, critical studies

Oxymorons of Privacy and Surveillance in "Smart Homes"

Philip Doty

University of Texas at Austin, USA

Surveillance is an important element of contemporary society. To understand current surveillance and its implications for privacy, this paper contributes to theory by identifying three oxymorons (apparent paradoxes) related to privacy and surveillance in the “smart home.” After discussing how “smart homes” are telling examples of the general privacy paradox (only an apparent paradox), the paper examines two related oxymorons: what I term the oxymoron of the surveillance of care and the oxymoron of inconvenient seamlessness. They are drawn from empirical, historical, and conceptual investigations of users’ attitudes and behaviors. The paper identifies defining differences between automated and “smart homes,” the complexity of understanding implications for privacy and surveillance of such homes, and how empirical studies of attitudes about and behavior related to “smart homes” can inform theory. The paper is partially grounded in feminist and historical research about the home, individual and family life, and consideration of contemporary surveillance theories. Carefully examining oxymorons about surveillance and privacy is key to our understanding and to our scholarly and political action, showing the continuing need for critical surveillance and privacy studies.



4:15pm - 4:30pm
ID: 348 / PS-21: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Community resilience, disaster management, public libraries, crisis

What is Essential?: Understanding Community Resilience and Public Libraries in the United States during Disasters

Beth Patin

Syracuse University, USA

Hurricane Katrina, the 4/27/2011 Tornadoes, the Oso Mudslide, and even more recently, the Coronavirus Pandemic, all demonstrated the devastating experience of disaster. While each of these extreme events varied in scope, size, and degree of disruption, each overwhelmed local authorities necessitating state and federal assistance. Prevention of disasters is ideal, but not practical. Preferably, the emphasis is placed on resilience or a community's ability to bounce back. Public libraries are considered trusted pillars in their community, posing them to provide critical information in the face of extreme challenges. This work explores community resilience and how public libraries in the United States, as Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)-designated essential community organizations, enhance community resilience.

American Library Association (ALA) Policy already recognizes the role libraries should play, and more recently, FEMA recognized libraries as "essential community organizations," tasking them with the responsibility of fulfilling critical information needs in the case of a disaster. However, this designation was made without a clear understanding of how libraries should support their communities, leading to confusion during the United States’ response to Covid19. This work identifies a gap between the perspectives of the librarians and disaster response agents and suggests methods for closing this gap.



4:30pm - 4:40pm
ID: 246 / PS-21: 3
Short Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: social networks, impact, value, research-practice gap, knowledge exchange

Research, Impact, Value and Library and Information Science (RIVAL): Development, Implementation, and Outcomes of a Scottish Network for LIS Researchers and Practitioners

Hazel Hall, Bruce Ryan

Edinburgh Napier University, UK

The research-practice gap in Library and Information Science (LIS) is well documented, especially in respect of the difficulties of translating research into practice, and resultant lost opportunities. While many researchers attempt to explain this research-practice gap, few suggest strategies to address it. The creation of researcher-practitioner networks, however, is one approach that has been proved empirically to bridge the distance between the two communities. Such a network is currently operating in Scotland, funded by the Royal Society of Edinburgh. Research, Impact, Value and Library and Information Science (RIVAL) is part-way through its implementation based around four knowledge exchange events for a network membership of 32 from a wide variety of LIS sectors. RIVAL’s successful delivery depends in part on the project leads’ experience of undertaking, and evaluating the impact of, a UK Arts and Humanities Research Council funded grant: the Developing Research Excellence and Methods (DREaM) project. Already there are indications that RIVAL is delivering value to network members. There is a strong expectation for this to be enhanced, both in the remainder of the funding period and beyond, offering theoretical contributions to the study of social networks, especially in respect of social capital development to support knowledge exchange.



4:40pm - 4:50pm
ID: 304 / PS-21: 4
Short Papers
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Education, Career, Data/Graph Mining, Information Recommendation

Community-Based Data Integration of Course and Job Data in Support of Personalized Career-Education Recommendations

Guoqing Zhu1, Naga Anjaneyulu Kopalle2, Yongzhen Wang2, Xiaozhong Liu2, Kemi Jona3, Katy Börner2

1Dalian Maritime University, People's Republic of China; 2Indiana University Bloomington, USA; 3Northeastern University, USA

How does your education impact your professional career? Ideally, the courses you take help you identify, get hired for, and perform the job you always wanted. However, not all courses provide skills that transfer to existing and future jobs; skill terms used in course descriptions might be different from those listed in job advertisements; and there might exist a considerable skill gap between what is taught in courses and what is needed for a job. In this study, we propose a novel method to integrate extensive course description and job advertisement data by leveraging heterogeneous data integration and community detection. The innovative heterogeneous graph approach along with identified skill communities enables cross-domain information recommendation, e.g., given an educational profile, job recommendations can be provided together with suggestions on education opportunities for re- and upskilling in support of lifelong learning.



4:50pm - 5:00pm
ID: 311 / PS-21: 5
Short Papers
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: Social media; Emergency; Forwarding behavior

Affective and Cognitive Features of Comments Added by Forwarders in Sina Weibo During Disasters

Xi Chen, Sijing Chen, Jin Mao, Gang Li

Wuhan University, People's Republic of China

In Sina Weibo, users are allowed to add comments to the shared post when forwarding and if the shared post is a non-original post, previous forwarders’ comments will be automatically kept. Notwithstanding the growing body of literature on social media usage in emergencies, little is known about the comments added by forwarders during disasters. This study aims to explore the affective and cognitive features of comments added by forwarders and its difference with the original posts during multiple emergency events. We conducted the analysis on 58,857 direct-added comments to 9,408 original posts about three disasters. The result suggests that direct-added comments may better reflect the emotional and cognitive processes of the public than original posts, and the emotional and cognitive expressions of added comments were significantly different between man-made disaster and natural disaster. Our future analysis will include comments added by mediated forwarders, and examine the effect of added comments on the dissemination of original posts in emergencies.

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmRacism Isn’t Just an American Problem: International EDI Issues in Information Science [SDGs 10, 16]
 
 
ID: 457 / [Single Presentation of ID 457]: 1
Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Accelerator Series
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: diversity, intenational, race

Toni Samek1, Loriene Roy2, Michelle Martin3, R. David Lankes4

1University of Alberta, Canada; 2University of Texas at Austin, USA; 3University of Washington, USA; 4University of South Carolina, USA

Pioneering Black librarian Dr. E.J. Josey told the global library and information science (LIS) community in 1998 that it had a problem with race. And now in 2020, that problem remains, in addition to a lack of literature related to race and a lack of diverse LIS professionals. This panel features LIS leaders with deep roots and connections to diverse international LIS communities. They will discuss their experiences and posit thoughts on how the problem of race might truly become a serious global discussion and area of action and advocacy. Josey, E. J. (1998). Remarks on racism, international relations and librarianship. Progressive Librarian, 15, 62-64.

 
Date: Thursday, 29/Oct/2020
9:00am - 10:30amFrom Way Across the Sea: Information Overload and International Students During the COVID-19 Pandemic [SDGs 3, 4]
 
 
ID: 236 / [Single Presentation of ID 236]: 1
Panels & Alternative Events
90 minutes
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: International students, digital journeys, information overload, information behaviour

Shanton Chang1, Dana McKay1, Nadia Caidi2, Antonette Mendoza1, Catherine Gomes3, Cansu Dedeoglu2

1University of Melbourne, Australia; 2iSchool, University of Toronto, Canada; 3RMIT University, Australia

This panel examines the interaction between being a migrant, using international students as a salient example, and information behaviours in a time of COVID-19. We address issues such as information overload, selection of information sources, and social networking. The aim of this panel is to bring together interested researchers in the areas of information practices, higher education, and intercultural communication.

 
9:00am - 10:30amMentoring, Immersion, and Long-Term Support of Underrepresented Students: Spotlight on the i3 Program [SDGs 4, 10, 16, 17]
 
 
ID: 458 / [Single Presentation of ID 458]: 1
Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Accelerator Series
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: underrepresented, students

Kayla Booth1, Megan Threats2, Lynette Yarger3, Curtis Cain4

1University of Pittsburgh, USA; 2Rutgers University, USA; 3Pennsylvania State University, USA; 4Howard University, USA

Among the most frequent conversations in library and information science (LIS) is that of recruitment of diverse candidates. Despite many initiatives to recruit a diverse LIS workforce (e.g., the ALA Spectrum Initiative, various IMLS grant-funded programs) there is still a dearth of diverse students in LIS programs, and therefore the professions. This session will spotlight the iSchool Inclusion Institute (i3) which is an undergraduate research and leadership development program that prepares students from underrepresented populations for graduate study and careers in the information sciences. Over 200 underrepresented students have participated in the program since 2011. 100% of these students have been accepted to one or more graduate LIS/IS programs, and 99% completed their programs (Booth et. al, 2020). The program will feature the i3 directors, program mentors, and a program alum who will share their strategies for recruit and mentoring success.

Booth, K. M., Eikey, E. V., Sanchez, J., Figueroa, J., & Falana, A. (2020, March). Expanding the REU Model Within an iSchool Context: Exploring iConference’s Potential Role in Addressing Underrepresentation. In International Conference on Information (pp. 497-510). Springer.

 
9:00am - 10:30amPaper Session 22: Affective Domain and Mental Health [SDG 3]
Session Chair: Ina Fourie, University of Pretoria, South Africa
 
 
9:00am - 9:15am
ID: 201 / PS-22: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: health informatics, mobile apps, privacy, trust, qualitative research, human information behavior

"Predictive Ads Are Not Doctors": Mental Health Tracking and Technology Companies

Kaitlin L. Costello, Diana Floegel

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, USA

Although using mobile phone apps to track and monitor mental health is increasingly popular, we know little about how and why people with mental health diagnoses use such technologies, nor do we know of concerns they may express about these apps. Further, automated assessments of mental health status, or digital phenotyping, are also on the rise; how people with mental health conditions feel about such technologies is also an underexplored area of research. This paper presents an exploratory interview study with 12 people that begins to address these gaps. We focus specifically on how participants, who all have been diagnosed mental health conditions, perceive tech companies’ involvement with existing mental health apps and mental health digital phenotyping. We find that participants satisfice in order to interact with existing mood tracking apps, and that they are wary of digital phenotyping for mental health diagnostics. Participants raise concerns related to profit motives, distrust, and fatalism in both cases, and they recommend regulations that may be put in place to keep tech companies in check. Though participants describe regulatory policies that may mitigate their concerns, we question whether regulations can truly foster sustainable interactions with mental health apps operated by technology companies.



9:15am - 9:30am
ID: 273 / PS-22: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Privacy and Ethics
Keywords: Social Media, Mental Health, Privacy

Privacy Considerations When Predicting Mental Health Using Social Media

Tian Wang, Masooda Bashir

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA

In recent years the number of individuals struggling with mental illness has increased, and traditional mental health services are now considered insufficient under the current circumstances which has prompted researchers to develop new approaches for mental healthcare. Social media usage is growing, and it is been utilized to help provide additional insight on mental health by using the information shared by individuals, as well as data taken from their social media activity. While this approach may provide a unique and effective perspective for mental health services, it is critical that privacy risks and protections are considered in the process. Social media services collect, process, and stores a substantial amount of information about its users and how that information is shared as well as what type of predictions are made may pose serious privacy concerns. This study aims to understand how privacy is addressed and emphasized during the process of using social media data for mental healthcare by constructing a systematic review on previous scholarly papers related to the topic. Solove’s taxonomy of privacy is used to evaluate these publications privacy considerations and to demonstrate the privacy risks that may arise when social media data is used for mental health.



9:30am - 9:45am
ID: 331 / PS-22: 3
Long Papers
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: emotional support online, intergenerational connection, epistolary forms online, YouTube, online advice

“Dear Amy”: Seeking Support on YouTube

Gabrielle Salib, Tim Gorichanaz, Denise Agosto

Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

Among many video genres, YouTube is a hub for “how-to” videos, including advice on how to work through difficult life circumstances. For this pilot study, we investigated a sample of comments in response to two Ask Me Anything videos recorded by a popular comedian and geared toward adolescents and emerging adults. Ask Me Anything videos respond to viewer questions on social, personal, and professional topics, such as coping with embarrassment, worries about school exams, relationship power dynamics, and general life stress. In our analysis, we identify emerging trends in the language of viewers’ responses and investigate (1) how viewers are responding to the videos, and (2) what such responses could mean for the design of social computing systems and their use for social and emotional support. We find indications of users’ emotional support seeking, evidence of adult audience members’ seeking to answer younger responders’ questions posted in response to the videos, and the use of epistolary forms to express perceived emotional connections with the video host. In future work, we will seek to understand what elements of the videos are invoking such personal connections and explore designs of social computing systems to better support personal connection and intergenerational support online.



9:45am - 10:00am
ID: 342 / PS-22: 4
Long Papers
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: non-response, being ignored, smartphone-mediated communication, sender’s perspective, non-verbal computer-mediated communication

Response to Non-Response: How People React When Their Smartphone Messages and Calls are Ignored

Naresh Kumar Agarwal, Wenqing Lu

Simmons University, USA

Smartphone-mediated communication has become the norm for a lot of people over the last two decades. It’s common to see people spend a large part of their days glued to their smartphones, maintaining constant connectivity through sending and receiving messages and calls. However, people, almost daily, experience their closed ones or professional contacts not responding to certain messages and phone calls from them. The objective of this project is to investigate the non-response behavior and the anxiety that people experience when their messages or calls are not responded to, and the resulting adverse effect on communication. Through interviews of 24 smartphone users, we found that the majority of the participants, especially those very active on social media, were highly affected by non-response. By better understanding individual reactions to non-response, the study recommends solutions and a framework for effective communication using smartphones. The study demonstrates how relationships play out in smartphone-based communication, and what we could do to make them better. The study will inform the youth, parents, teachers, employers, and the society as a whole, as we embrace changes brought about by smartphone-mediated communication.

 
9:00am - 10:30amPaper Session 23: Information & Gender [SDGs 3, 5, 10]
Session Chair: Kathryn La Barre, University of Illinois, United States of America
 
 
9:00am - 9:15am
ID: 205 / PS-23: 1
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: women’s concerns, gender equality, Alabama, public libraries, website content analysis

Women’s Concerns in Alabama’s Public Libraries: An Exploratory Website Content Analysis of Illustrative Information Support Services

Bharat Mehra, Baheya S. Jaber

University of Alabama, USA

The United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development ratified 17 goals as a

global blueprint towards “economic, social and environmental sustainability” of all nations. It includes "Gender Equality” (Sustainable Development Goal 5) that seeks to empower women and girls by eliminating discrimination and providing equal opportunities for their fuller participation in all aspects of life. This case study provides an exploratory assessment of web-based information for women in Alabama’s public libraries located in the “American South” and its Appalachian region. Both have experienced ostracization and stereotyping in popular culture owing to political and religious conservativeness, Civil Rights struggles, gender prejudice, and hostile conditions towards women/minorities. This exploratory website content analysis identifies seven examples of information offerings categorized into three groupings: (1) information sources (collections, resources); (2) information policy and planning (assigned role, strategic representation); (3) connections (internal, external, news and events). It develops a taxonomic framework with representative examples that challenge the regional stereotype in its images of solely deficit marginalization. The discussion provides new directions and potential opportunities to build collaborations of sharing within Alabama’s public libraries and beyond to better address women’s concerns and gender inequities in their local and regional communities.



9:15am - 9:30am
ID: 226 / PS-23: 2
Long Papers
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Sexual Harassment, Text Mining, Space, Classification

Space Identification of Sexual Harassment Reports with Text Mining

Amir Karami, Suzanne Swan, Marcos F. Moraes

University of South Carolina, USA

Sexual harassment is an invisible problem that has been difficult to combat because victims are often reluctant to report. However, within the past years, the sheer volume of women who have spoken up about sexual harassment has brought the issue to the forefront. This change has been largely driven, in part, by Internet and social media technologies. Given the large size of data posted on these online technologies, it is impossible to manually analyze and organize it; therefore, there is a need to utilize data and text mining methods. In order to help the fight against sexual harassment, this study proposes a predictive framework to collect more than 14,000 sexual harassment reports on the everyday sexism project (ESP) website and identify the space (location) in the reports. Our framework achieves a 85.33% accuracy for seven space classes including workplace, public space, home, public transport, school, university, and media. This paper also enriches experiments by merging similar classes (e.g., school and university) and applies a feature selection method to reduce the number of features for efficiency and effectiveness purposes. This enrichment process offers promising results for different sets of classes and features, ranging from 86% - 93% accuracy.



9:30am - 9:45am
ID: 319 / PS-23: 3
Long Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: Gender Difference, Neutral Name, Scientific Impact, Regression

Do Scientists’ Neutral Names Affect Their Research Impact?

Ning Zhang, Jiang Li

Nanjing University, People's Republic of China

Gender difference is a widespread problem existing in academia and industries; women have been long suffered from lower-status, underrepresentation, differential treatment, and other difficulties. Studies of some occupations showed that neutral names could help make up for that inferior position. Using the publication data of WoS from 2009 to 2015, this paper analyzed citations within three years after publication, to investigate whether a neutral name has an impact on the research impact of a scientist. The findings show that: (1) papers were cited significantly more when the first author's names are more neutral; (2) the effect of single author's name neutralization degree on citation in each field showed no significant difference; and (3) the more gender-specific the authors' names are, the fewer citations the papers received, in the fields of "Clinical, Pre-Clinical & Health", "Engineering & Technology", "Life Sciences" and "Physical Sciences".



9:45am - 9:55am
ID: 157 / PS-23: 4
Short Papers
Topics: Library and Information Science
Keywords: drag queen storytimes, public libraries, LGBTQ+ populations, social justice, qualitative methods

Values, Risks, and Power Influencing Librarians’ Decisions to Host Drag Queen Storytime

Diana Floegel1, Sarah Barriage2, Vanessa L. Kitzie3, Shannon Oltmann2

1Rutgers University, USA; 2University of Kentucky, USA; 3University of South Carolina, USA

This paper reports preliminary qualitative findings from a survey of public library staff who work at libraries that have and have not hosted drag queen storytimes (DQS), a popular but contested children’s program. Three constructs—values, risks, and power—are developed to describe how individual, library, and institutional forces combine to determine whether DQS occur. Findings contribute to limited scholarly work on DQS by including locations that have not hosted DQS and by engaging critically with how institutional forces shape library staffs’ decision-making around DQS. It is critical to understand factors contributing to this decision-making to inform contextually appropriate strategies for encouraging dialogue about DQS as well as LGBTQ+ visibility and justice in children’s programming. Moreover, DQS constitute a salient context through which to critically explore broader issues of power and inclusion in public libraries.

 
9:00am - 10:30amunCommons: SIG-SM: Science Slam

Zoom Meeting ID: 892 2046 2746
Password:  593849

 
11:00am - 12:30pmBusiness Meeting - All Are Welcome

Zoom Meeting ID: 826 6763 7357
Passcode: asistam20

 
4:00pm - 5:30pmClosing Plenary: Information for a Sustainable World: A Call to Action

Moderators: Clara M. Chu, Mortenson Distinguished Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2019-20 ASIS&T President); Kendra S. Albright, Goodyear Endowed Professor in Knowledge Management, School of Information, Kent State University, and Bharat Mehra, EBSCO Endowed Chair in Social Justice & Professor, University of Alabama (2020 ASIS&T Annual Meeting Co-Chairs)

Panelists: Africa Chapter, Asia Pacific Chapter, Europe Chapter, South Asia, New England Chapter

  1. Blessing Mawire, International Development Consultant, INTEGRA Consultants, Email: chataira@gmail.com (Africa Chapter)
  2. Jia Tina Du, Associate Professor, STEM, University of South Australia, Email: tina.du@unisa.edu.au (Asia Pacific Chapter)
  3. Aylin Ilhan, Institute for Language and Information Science; Department of Information Science, Heinrich-Heine-University, Germany, Email: aylin.ilhan@hhu.de (Europe Chapter)
  4. Anwarul Islam, University of the Dhaka, Bangladesh, Email: anwar@du.ac.bd (South Asia Chapter)
  5. Jay Bowling, Harvard University, Email: jbowling@g.harvard.edu (New England Chapter)
 
6:00pm - 7:00pmCoffee, Tea and Cocktails Social Hour

Zoom Meeting ID: 926 321 2704 
Passcode: asistam20 

 
Date: Friday, 30/Oct/2020
8:00am - 12:00pmWriting-Up Research as a Thematic Narrative
 
 
ID: 117 / [Single Presentation of ID 117]: 1
Workshops
4 hours
Topics: Research Methods
Keywords: Qualitative research, writing-up research, thematic narrative

Jenna Hartel

University of Toronto, Canada

There is a shortage of guidance and acumen in information science when it comes to writing-up qualitative research. This workshop will present an effective strategy for reporting such findings. Participants will be taught to write a thematic narrative: a gradually unfolding descriptive account that relates vivid pieces of field data to relevant concepts in the scholarly literature. To that end, attendees will learn to create excerpt-commentary units: rhetorical structures that contain four distinct and purposeful elements. The Workshop will be production-oriented, and attendees should ideally bring a data set ready to write-up. This workshop suits doctoral students with research underway, experienced social scientists who wish to fortify their writing, and those who supervise or edit qualitative research. The instructor, Dr. Jenna Hartel, has won the Library Journal/ALISE Excellence in Teaching Award (2016) and she has taught this method to more than 200 masters and doctoral students at the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto.

 
10:00am - 11:30amSIG-MET Business Meeting

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81040136706

Meeting ID: 810 4013 6706
Passcode: 922479

 
1:00pm - 5:00pmBest Practices for Grant Proposal Development: NSF, NIH, IMLS, IARPA, Amazon, and Google, etc.
 
 
ID: 204 / [Single Presentation of ID 204]: 1
Workshops
4 hours
Topics: Data Science; Analytics; and Visualization
Keywords: Grant, Proposal, Funding

Amir Karami1, Kevin Crowston6, Kenneth R. Fleischmann2, Javed Mostafa3, Xia Lin4, Chirag Shah5, Jana Diesner8, Mohammad Hossein Jarrahi3, Catherine Dumas7, Jennifer Stromer-Galley1

1Syracuse University, USA; 2University of Texas at Austin, USA; 3University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA; 4Drexel University, USA; 5University of Washington, USA; 6University of South Carolina, USA; 7Simmons University, USA; 8University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

Proposal development is an essential skill for academics of all ranks. During proposal development, researchers can better organize their thoughts for what they want to plan and achieve in a research project. Even if research proposal is not awarded, the exercise of proposal writing is often beneficial to the research process. Today, one’s ability to seek and receive funding from grant agencies is often used as a yardstick for important personnel decisions by academic institutions. However, researchers, especially junior faculty members, who are just starting their careers often have limited experience with the grant development process. The goal of this half-day workshop is to provide practical guides to investigators, enhancing their understanding of the process and their abilities to write a successful external grant proposal. Participants will have the opportunity to learn best practices from senior scholars who have been awarded several external grants from multiple agencies and agreed to present in this workshop.

 
4:00pm - 8:00pmPublic Engagement for Information Researchers
 
 
ID: 267 / [Single Presentation of ID 267]: 1
Tutorials
4 hours
Topics: Research Methods
Keywords: Research impact, Public engagement, Research methods, Research ethics, Knowledge translation

Devon Greyson1, Wade Kelly2

1University of Massachusetts, USA; 2La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia

What is your responsibility to society as a researcher? What are your goals with regard to research impact and public engagement? How do you leverage and expand the skills in your research toolkit to achieve those goals and fulfill your responsibilities in the area of public engagement?

This tutorial will first lead participants through clarifying one’s impact/engagement goals, conducting a stakeholder analysis, and creating a project knowledge translation plan. Following a short break, we will delve into examples of, and skills for, a few specific types of common public engagement activities: media interviews, op-ed writing, public-oriented research summaries/videos/infographics, and policy briefing notes. There will be opportunities to practice some of these skills within the tutorial, as well as resources provided for further individual development.

 
Date: Saturday, 31/Oct/2020
8:00am - 12:00pmPart 1: Ten Lessons for the Age of Disinformation
 
 
ID: 115 / Work 09-1: 1
Workshops
8 hours
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: disinformation ecology, cognitive authorities, information literacy, media literacy, information ethics

Ten Lessons for the Age of Disinformation

Thomas J. Froehlich

Kent State University, USA

Ten Lessons for the Age of Disinformation will provide pedagogical techniques to teach ASIS&T members how to cope with our current disinformation ecology, which the author calls the “Age of Disinformation.” It provides a multifaceted approach in which each facet reinforces the others. Topics include (1) characteristics of the Age of Disinformation; (2) the varieties of false information; (3) knowledge, opinion, and second-hand knowledge; (4) deception and self-deception; (5) psychological factors for the acceptance and perpetuation of fake news; (6) cognitive authorities, such as the Washington Post or Fox News; (7) intellectual freedom, freedom of expression and social media; (8) information ethics, media ethics, digital ethics and the violation of ethical principles; (9) logical fallacies in disinformation campaigns; and (10) the benefits and limitations of information literacy, media literacy and digital literacy. Each lesson outlines the key ideas for each lesson and provides exercises to confirm the key points. There will be suggested exercises to do before the workshop begins (e.g., identifying fake news sites), discussions in which to engage and online exercises to do as the workshop progresses, such as identifying violations of ethical or logical principles or discussing kinds of cognitive authorities and their influence.

 
1:00pm - 5:00pmCANCELED: Navigating Through the Panoply of Provenance Metadata Standards
 
1:00pm - 5:00pmPart 1: Sociotechnical Change Agents: ICTs, Sustainability, and Global Challenges (SIG-SI, SIG-SM SIG-IEP)
 
 
ID: 254 / WORK 10-1: 1
Workshops
8 hours
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Social informatics, social media, information ethics and policy, sustainability, social change

Sociotechnical Change Agents: ICTs, Sustainability, and Global Challenges (SIG-SI, SIG-SM, SIG-IEP)

Rachel N. Simons1, Loni Hagen2, Colin Rhinesmith3, Vivek Singh4, Xiaohua Zhu5, Abigail Phillips6

1Texas Woman's University, USA; 2University of South Florida, USA; 3Simmons University, USA; 4Rutgers University, USA; 5University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA; 6University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA

Aligning with the theme of the 2020 ASIS&T Annual Meeting, Special Interest Group Social Informatics (SIG SI) will hold its 16th annual symposium in conjunction with SIG Social Media (SIG SM) and SIG Information Ethics and Policy (SIG IEP), allowing for ASIS&T members to better discuss how we might work collaboratively as “change agents actively addressing society’s grand challenges” (ASIS&T, 2020). The purpose of this workshop is to investigate how research and practice focused on the interaction of people, technology, and society may address societal grand challenges, including addressing the United Nation’s 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. Submissions may include empirical, critical, conceptual, and theoretical work, as well as practice cases and demonstrations. This collaborative workshop will consist of interactive panel and breakout sessions.

 
6:00pm - 7:00pmCoffee, Tea and Cocktails Social Hour for SIG-III

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89806174955

Meeting ID: 898 0617 4955
Passcode: 334893

 
Date: Sunday, 01/Nov/2020
8:00am - 12:00pmPart 2: Ten Lessons for the Age of Disinformation
 
 
ID: 115 / Work 09-1: 1
Workshops
8 hours
Topics: Social Media and Social Computing
Keywords: disinformation ecology, cognitive authorities, information literacy, media literacy, information ethics

Ten Lessons for the Age of Disinformation

Thomas J. Froehlich

Kent State University, USA

Ten Lessons for the Age of Disinformation will provide pedagogical techniques to teach ASIS&T members how to cope with our current disinformation ecology, which the author calls the “Age of Disinformation.” It provides a multifaceted approach in which each facet reinforces the others. Topics include (1) characteristics of the Age of Disinformation; (2) the varieties of false information; (3) knowledge, opinion, and second-hand knowledge; (4) deception and self-deception; (5) psychological factors for the acceptance and perpetuation of fake news; (6) cognitive authorities, such as the Washington Post or Fox News; (7) intellectual freedom, freedom of expression and social media; (8) information ethics, media ethics, digital ethics and the violation of ethical principles; (9) logical fallacies in disinformation campaigns; and (10) the benefits and limitations of information literacy, media literacy and digital literacy. Each lesson outlines the key ideas for each lesson and provides exercises to confirm the key points. There will be suggested exercises to do before the workshop begins (e.g., identifying fake news sites), discussions in which to engage and online exercises to do as the workshop progresses, such as identifying violations of ethical or logical principles or discussing kinds of cognitive authorities and their influence.

 
1:00pm - 5:00pmPart 2: Sociotechnical Change Agents: ICTs, Sustainability, and Global Challenges (SIG-SI, SIG-IEP, SIG-SM)
 
 
ID: 254 / WORK 10-1: 1
Workshops
8 hours
Topics: Technology; Culture; and Society
Keywords: Social informatics, social media, information ethics and policy, sustainability, social change

Sociotechnical Change Agents: ICTs, Sustainability, and Global Challenges (SIG-SI, SIG-SM, SIG-IEP)

Rachel N. Simons1, Loni Hagen2, Colin Rhinesmith3, Vivek Singh4, Xiaohua Zhu5, Abigail Phillips6

1Texas Woman's University, USA; 2University of South Florida, USA; 3Simmons University, USA; 4Rutgers University, USA; 5University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA; 6University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA

Aligning with the theme of the 2020 ASIS&T Annual Meeting, Special Interest Group Social Informatics (SIG SI) will hold its 16th annual symposium in conjunction with SIG Social Media (SIG SM) and SIG Information Ethics and Policy (SIG IEP), allowing for ASIS&T members to better discuss how we might work collaboratively as “change agents actively addressing society’s grand challenges” (ASIS&T, 2020). The purpose of this workshop is to investigate how research and practice focused on the interaction of people, technology, and society may address societal grand challenges, including addressing the United Nation’s 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. Submissions may include empirical, critical, conceptual, and theoretical work, as well as practice cases and demonstrations. This collaborative workshop will consist of interactive panel and breakout sessions.

 

 
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