Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
Session Overview
Session
PaperSession-04: Institutions & Data
Time:
Thursday, 03/Oct/2019:
9:00am - 10:30am

Session Chair: Stefan Baack
Location: P413A
(cap. 54)

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Presentations
9:00am - 9:20am

THE IMPACT OF ATTITUDES TOWARDS GOVERNMENT AND CORPORATIONS ON TRUST IN TECHNOLOGY

Yi-Ning Katherine Chen, Chia-Ho Ryan Wen

National Chengchi University, Taiwan

Understanding public distrust of technology is both theoretically and practically important, yet while previous research has focused on the association between political ideology and trust in science, it is at best an inconsistent predictor. This study shall demonstrate that two dimensions of political ideology, attitudes towards governments and corporations, can more precisely predict trust in technology across issues. We will conduct an online survey on the science of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications to test our hypotheses that trust in technology varies across issues and that attitudes towards government and corporations are important predictors of this trust.



9:20am - 9:40am

"OPEN DATA MEANS BUSINESS": WHEN MONETARY POTENTIAL IN OPEN DATA USURPS ASPIRATIONS FOR ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPERANCY IN THE SMART CITY

Gunes Tavmen

Birkbeck, University of London, United Kingdom

As opposed to technocratic and top-to-bottom smart city discourses, open data has been deployed to transform these into “citizen-centric” ones. London is one of the prime examples of such positioning of open data in pursuit to create an alternative to corporate-driven smart city narratives. Prior to this, open data was already a governmental strategy in the UK in their pursuit of Transparency Agenda due to the assumptions that having access to governmental data would automatically yield transparency and accountability. However, shortly after, the economic value in open data displaced the social impact to periphery. As a result, the Open Data Institute (ODI) was established to unlock the economic value in open data. Located at the heart of London’s tech-scene, the ODI has attempted to contest what they referred to as “corporate-driven smart city”. Nevertheless, born out of a discourse in which lucrative potential usurped democratic aspirations, the ODI has subsequently been an environment that materialised, contributed and reiterated the prevailing smart city discourse. By way of a close observation of the ODI’s activities between late 2014 to mid-2017, as well as an analysis on the transformation of UK government's open data discourse, I argue that once advocated as tool for accountability and transparency, open data is mostly promoted for its monetary value.



9:40am - 10:00am

NOTES FROM THE WEB THAT WAS: THE PLATFORM POLITICS OF CRAIGSLIST

Jessa Lingel

University of Pennsylvania, United States of America

This paper offers an analysis of craigslist’s platform politics as a way of theorizing key transitions in digital culture over the last 25 years. I focus on craigslist’s monetization strategies and its defense of anonymity. Both policies emphasize Craigslist’s commitment to Web 1.0 ethics around user autonomy, producing an important counter-narrative in a contemporary digital landscape that emphasizes continual self-disclosure, reduced user agency and increased levels of surveillance. I use craigslist’s design ethics as an example of platform refusal, meaning a set of decisions that challenge dominant norms of digital culture.



10:00am - 10:20am

Second-hand self-tracking

Ben Lyall

Monash University, Australia

This paper discusses the use of online advertisements to gain retroactive insights into the use and disuse of wearable self-tracking technologies in everyday life. This is achieved by examining over 2,700 listings for devices from manufacturers like Apple, Fitbit, and Garmin. These listings are sourced from an online second-hand marketplace - Gumtree Australia.

In this exchange space, sellers often espouse the value of self-tracking, and trust in data presented as "objective". They do this by repurposing existing retail product descriptions, and leverage personal achievements as demonstrations. Despite the “sale imperative” of this advertisement platform, item descriptions often feature disclosures about health goals, bodily capacities, and social expectations.

This paper discusses these advertisements, and how they are framed within (but also sometimes against) the existing marketing constructs of self-tracking. Wearable devices are highly transient in the second-hand space. Yet, the apparent importance of undertaking personal self-tracking projects is constantly espoused - even as devices are passed-on to new users



 
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